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PREF-A C E.

THE year 1826 has been a busy year in almost every quarter of the world.

The variety and the importance of the negotiations, military operations, and measures of civil polity, which have been in progress, have added greatly to the ordinary labours of our task; and thus, in order to give a full delineation of the events and transactions of the year, we have been compelled to extend that portion of our volume, which is devoted to historical narrative, beyond its usual limits. This increase of size in the more important part of the work has made it necessary to allot to philosophy and miscellaneous literature fewer pages than we have generally done heretofore, or mean to do hereafter.

They who survey the contents of our history will not be surprised, that our period of publication should be a few weeks later than usual. Fully aware of the value and convenience of punctuality, we have taken care for several years that the appearance of the Annual Register should not be deferred

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beyond the month of June. But, on the present occasion, the greater degree of labour required in the composition of the volume rendered it impossible to complete it by the usual time, Had we attempted to hasten the period of our publication by a few weeks, we could not have presented to our readers so faithful and distinct a narrative of the business of the year as that which we now lay before them.

August 1st, 1827.

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State of the Country-Meeting of Parliament~King's Speech and the
Address-Measures proposed for relieving the Commercial Distresses
Prohibition against Stamping small Notes—Mr. Hume's Motion for
Returns of Bankrupt Country Banks--Bill brought in to prohibit the
Circulation of small Notes after Feb. 5th, 1829–Exception in favour
of the Bank of England~Mr. Hume's Motion to require Security from
Country Banks Reasons for limiting the Bill to England-Scottish
Banks

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CHAPTER II.

-Arrangement with the Bank of England Bill brought into the House of

Lords to enable private Banks to have an unlimited Number of Partners Clause introduced authorising the Bank of England to establish Branch Banks Discussion on the Propriety of relieving the existing Distress by an Issue of Exchequer Bills-The Bank agrees to advance Money upon Security-Bill to enable Factors holding Documents of Property in Goods, to pledge them to the Bank as effectually as if they were the real Owners--Appointment of a Committee on Emigration. CORN LAWS: Mr. Whitmore's Motion-Bill to allow the admission of Bonded Corn into the Market-Bill to authorize Government to Import a limited quantity of Foreign Grain during the Recess-Mr. Ellice's Motion on the State of the Silk Trade-Petitions concerning the Navigation Laws-Mr. Huskisson's Statement of the Effects of the recent Alterations in these Laws-Relaxation of the Navigation Laws in favour of the new South American States.

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CHAPTER III.

FINANCE.-The Budget-Mr. Maberly's Resolutions on the National

Debt-Mr. Hume's Motion on the State of the Nation, and Forty-five
Resolutions regarding the FinancesOpposition to the Navy Estimates
-Mr. Hobhouse's Motion to reduce the Army-Discussion on the
Expense of the Diplomatic Establishment

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CHAPTER IV.

Bill to prevent Bribery at Elections-Resolutions against Bribery--Lord

John Russell's Motion on Parliamentary Reform-Mr. Abercromby's

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