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himself by playing a tune. The hermit led him through the forest to the path he sought, wondering much if this could be the man of whom the angel spake. He asked him what good works he had done. The man said he had done nothing: “I am but a poor minstrel, and spend all my time in-amusing the people by my flute, and sometimes I sing to them.”

“And how art thou so poor?” asked the hermit: “I doubt thou hast wasted thy substance in riotous living."

Nay, my father; but there was a poor woman, whom I found in great distress, because her husband and children had been sold into slavery to pay a debt. I gave all that I possessed to redeem them, so that I became poor. But why do I speak of that? Is there a man who would not have done the same?"

Then the hermit wept, and said, “I thank thee: thou hast taught me my duty. Thou, a poor minstrel, hast done more good than I whom men call a holy hermit. I see we should do good in little things, if we cannot do great things.”

So he returned no more to his cave, but dwelt among men, and spent the remainder of his days in doing good.

Now, if the thousands of dear children, who read the Lamp of Love, will try this plan, which it took the hermit twenty-five years to learn, what happy hours theirs will be! Do all the good you can, whether it is little or much: do it for Christ's sake, and then in all your conduct there will shine the light of love.

F. W. I.

December 1858.

47

PAGE
POETRY-Continued.
Discontented Robin, The

228
Don't Kill the Birds,

112
Elijah,

17
Father's Return, The

217
Flood, The

61
Gipsy Baby's Grave, The

9
Holy Child Jesus, The

234
Illustrated Bible, The

175
It is Time to Seek the Lord,

279
Little Sins,
Mother's Care, A

247
Neatness,

85
Night Storm, The

48
Saviour's Call, The

209
Shepherd Boy, The

200
Spring,

70
Thoughts for the Sea-shore,

154
Two Swords, The

254
Vain Primrose, The

127
Wild Flowers,

192
Winter,
POETRY, with MUSIC
Bible, The

264
Hosanna,

24
How
Lovely are the Woods,

168
Hymn for a Child,

96
Prayer,

144
Smiling
May,

120
Storm, The

216
Tempest, The

72
Poor Man's Wish, A

160
Pray without Ceasing,

182
Precious Little Plant, The

157
Prisoner for Life, The

229
Prodigal Returning, The

110
Quarrelsome Neighbour, The

265
Read your Bible,

105
Reading without a Book,

165
Refuge, The

105
Rust, Gilding, and Polish,

136
Safe House to Sleep in, A

156
Sir Walter Raleigh,

111
Small Leak, The

129
Song in the Snow, A

113
Spanish Nun, The

12
Stop in Time,

177
That Little Book,

273
Things Coming,

233
Thomas Ward,

161
Uncle William & his Heirs, i, 35, 49, 74, 97, 121, 147, 169, 193, 223, 248, 267
What a Dumb Girl said about Prayer,

55
What a Sunbeam did,

22
What did the Clock Say?

46
What I Saw in my Walk,

258
Widow's Lamp, The

211
Woodpecker's Befence, The

198
Word in Season, A

10

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UNCLE WILLIAM AND HIS HEIRS.

CHAP. I.—THE TRAVELLER'S RETURN. GATHERED round the door of an old-fashioned country inn, a group of persons might have been seen waiting

A

for the arrival of the daily coach, the Red Rover. One or two were expecting to meet friends by it, while others had something in the way of luggage, showing that they were going a journey; but the greater part were evidently mere idlers, who were there because they had nothing else to do, and were whistling for want of thought, or puffing out huge volumes of tobacco-smoke, as they lounged against the wall.

A dashing carriage, with livery servants, which drew up at the inn door, attracted all eyes towards it. A gentleman and lady and little girl got out and went into the inn, while the group outside occupied themselves with gossip.

“That’s Squire Temple, from Eltham Hall,” said one; "it isn't often as his carriage is seen in Ribbleton; I wonder what's brought him here."

It was soon discovered that the little girl was Mr Temple's niece, who had resided with him for some time, but was now going in the coach with her aunt, Mrs Clayton, who was taking her away to live with her; and that, moreover, the young lady was an orphan and a great heiress,

It was really surprising that the gossips learned all this so quickly, and still more wonderful that it was true. They were busily discussing Squire Temple, his family, his carriage and horses, when the cheerful “ Tally-ho” of the horn was heard, and the coach itself came dashing up the street at a tremendous rate; the coachman apparently wishing to delude the good folks of Ribbleton into the idea that such was the ordinary speed of his horses.

Great was the attention paid by the landlord to Squire Temple; and as soon as the coach stopped, and the burly coachman had got down from his box, the Jandlord said, with an air of great importance, -

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