The London Magazine, Nide 7

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Taylor and Hessey, 1823
 

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Sivu 258 - I was repairing some of the loose leaves with paste, which your impatience would not suffer to be left till daybreak, — was there no pleasure in being a poor man ? or can those neat black clothes which you wear now, and are so careful to keep brushed since we have become rich and finical, give you half the honest vanity with which you flaunted it about in that over-worn...
Sivu 402 - Because the daughters of Zion are haughty, and walk with stretched forth necks and wanton eyes, walking and mincing as they go, and making a tinkling with their feet...
Sivu 258 - ... lighted out the relic from his dusty treasures ; and when you lugged it home, wishing it were twice as cumbersome ; and when you presented it to me, and when we were exploring the perfectness of it, (collating you called it ;) and while I was repairing some of the loose leaves with paste, which your impatience would not suffer to be left till daybreak, — was there no pleasure in being a poor man...
Sivu 92 - Fair Ines had always, for me, an inexpressible charm : O saw ye not fair Ines ? She's gone into the West, To dazzle when the sun is down. And rob the world of rest : She took our daylight with her, The smiles that we love best, With morning blushes on her cheek, And pearls upon her breast.
Sivu 258 - I had to get you to consent in those times !) — we were used to have a debate two or three days before, and to weigh the for and against, and think what we might spare it out of, and what saving we could hit upon, that should be an equivalent. A thing was worth buying then, when we felt the money that we paid for it.
Sivu 643 - Our age was cultivated thus at length ; But what we gain'd in skill we lost in strength. Our builders were with want of genius curst ; The second temple was not like the first ; Till you, the best Vitruvius, come at length, Our beauties equal, but excel our strength.
Sivu 524 - Do take another slice, Mr. Billet, for you do not get pudding every day." The old gentleman said nothing at the time — but he took occasion in the course of the evening, when some argument had intervened between them, to utter with an emphasis which chilled the company, and which chills me now as I write it — "Woman, you are superannuated!
Sivu 523 - ... equal in standing, perhaps, he was thus obsequiously and gratuitously ducking. Such a state of things could not last. W must change the air of Oxford, or be suffocated. He chose the former; and let the sturdy moralist, who strains the point of the filial duties as high as they can bear, censure the dereliction ; he cannot estimate the struggle. I stood with W , the last afternoon I ever saw him, under the eaves of his paternal dwelling. It was in the fine lane leading from the High-street to...
Sivu 644 - Now Jove suspends his golden scales in air, Weighs the men's wits against the lady's hair: The doubtful beam long nods from side to side; At length the wits mount up, the hairs subside. See fierce Belinda on the baron flies, With more than usual lightning in her eyes: Nor fear'd the chief th' unequal fight to try, Who sought no more than on his foe to die.
Sivu 141 - Sometime, we see a cloud that's dragonish, A vapour, sometime, like a bear, or lion, A tower'd citadel, a pendant rock, A forked mountain, or blue promontory With trees upon't, that nod unto the world, And mock our eyes with air: thou hast seen these signs; They are black vesper's pageants.

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