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Department of Marine and Fisheries.

The words “prolonged blast” used in this article, shall mean a blast of from to 4 to 6 seconds' duration.

A steam vessel shall be provided with an efficient whistle or siren, sounded by steam or some substitute for steam, so placed that the sound may not be intercepted by any obstruction, and with an efficient fog-horn, to be sounded by mechanical means, and also with an efficient bell.

A sailing vessel of 20 tons gross tonnage or upwards shall be provided with a similar fog-horn and bell. In fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rain storms, whether by day or night, the signals described in this article shall be used as follows,

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(a.) A steam vessel having way upon her shall sound, at intervals of not. more than 2 minutes, a prolonged blast.

(6.) A steam vessel under way, but stopped and having no way upon her, shall sound at intervals of not more than 2 minutes, 2 prolonged blasts, with an interval of about one second between them.

(c.) A sailing vessel under way shall sound, at intervals of not more than one minute, when on the starboard tack, one blast, when on the port tack two blasts in succession, and when with the wind abaft the beam three blasts in succession.

(d.) A vessel when at anchor shall, at intervals of not more than one minute, ring the bell rapidly for about five seconds.

(e.) A vessel, when towing a vessel employed in laying or in picking up a telegraph cable, and a vessel under way, which is unable to get out of the way of an approaching vessel through being not under command, or unable to mancuvre as required by these rules, shall, instead of the signals prescribed in subdivisions (a) and (c) of this article, at intervals of not more than two minutes, sound three blasts in succession, viz., one prolonged blast, followed by two short blasts. A vessel towed may give this signal and she shall not give any other.

Sailing vessels and boats of less than 20 tons gross tonnage shall not be obliged to give the above mentioned signals, but if they do not, they shall make some other efficient sound-signal at intervals of not more than one minute.

Speed of Ships to be moderate in fog, &c. Art. 16. Every vessel shall, in a fog, mist, falling snow, or heavy rain storms, go at a moderate speed, having careful regard to the existing circumstances and conditions.

A steam vessel hearing, apparently forward of her beam, the fog-signal of a vessel the position of which is not ascertained, shall, so far as the circumstances of the case admit, stop her engines, and then navigate with caution until danger of collision is over.

STEERING AND SAILING RULES.

Preliminary-Risk of Collision. Risk of collision can, when circumstances permit, be ascertained by carefully watching the compass bearing of an approaching vessel. If the bearing does not appreciably change, such risk should be deemed to exist.

Department of Marine and Fisheries.

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Art. 17. When two sailing vessels are approaching one another, so as to involve risk of collision, one of them shall keep out of the way of the other, as follows, viz. :

(a.) A vessel which is running free shall keep out of the way of a vessel which is close hauled.

(6.) A vessel which is close hauled on the port tack shall keep out of the way

of a vessel which is close hauled on the starboard tack.

(c.) When both are running free, with the wind on different sides, the vessel 'which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.

(a.) When both are running free, with the wind on the same side, the vessel which is to the windward shall keep out of the way of the vessel which is to leeward.

(e.) A vessel which has the wind aft shall keep out of the way of the other vessel.

Art. 18. When two steam vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, so as to involve risk of collision, each shall alter her course to starboard, so that each may pass on the port side of the other.

This article only applies to cases where vessels are meeting end on, or nearly end on, in such a manner as to involve risk of collision, and does not apply to two vessels which must, if both keep on their respective courses, pass clear of each other.

The only cases to which it does apply are when each of the two vessels is end on, or nearly end on, to the other; in other words, to cases, in which, by day, each vessel sees the masts of the other in a line, or nearly in a line, with her own; and, by night, to cases in which each vessel is in such a position as to see both the side-lights of the other.

It does not apply, by day, to cases in which a vessel sees another ahead crossing her own course; or by night, to cases where the red light of one vessel is opposed to the red light of the other, or where the green light of one vessel is opposed to the green light of the other, or where a red light without a green light, or a green light without a red light, is seen ahead, or where both green and red lights are seen anywhere but ahead.

Art. 19. When two steam vessels are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her own starboard side shall keep out of the way of the other.

Art. 20. When a steam vessel and a sailing vessel are proceeding in such directions as to involve risk of collision, the steam vessel shall keep out of the way of the sailing vessel.

Art. 21. Where by any of these rules one or two vessels is to keep out of the way, the other shall keep her course and speed.

NOTE.— When, in consequence of thick weather or other causes, such vessel finds herself so close that collision cannot be avoided by the action of the giving-way vessel alone, she also shall take such action as will best aid to avert the collision.

(See articles 27 and 29.)

Art. 22. Every vessel which is directed by these rules to keep out of the way of another vessel shall, if the circumstances of the case admit, avoid crossing ahead of the other.

Department of Marine and Fisheries.

Art. 23. Every steam vessel which is directed by these rules to keep out of the way of another vessel shall, on approaching her, if necessary, slacken her speed or stop or reverse.

Art. 24. Notwithstanding anything contained in these rules, every vessel overtaking any other, shall keep out of the way of the overtaken vessel.

Every vessel coming up with another vessel from any direction more than two points abaft her beam, i.e., in such a position, in reference to the vessel which she is overtaking, that at night she would be unable to see either of that vessel's side-lights, shall be deemed to be an overtaking vessel, and no subsequent alteration of the bearing between the two vessels shall make the overtaking vessel a crossing vessel within the meaning of these rules, or relieve her of the duty of keeping clear of the overtaken vessel until she is finally past and clear.

As by day the overtaking vessel cannot always know with certainty whether she is forward of or abast this direction from the other vessel, she should, if in doubt, assume that she is an overtaking vessel and keep out of

the way.

Art. 25. In narrow channels every steam vessel shall, when it is safe and practicable, keep to that side of the fairway or mid-channel which lies on the starboard side of such vessel.

Art. 26. Sailing vessels under way shall keep out of the way of sailing vessels or boats fishing with nets, or lines, or trawls. This rule shall not give

, to any vessel or boat engaged in fishing the right of obstructing a fairway used by vessels other than fishing vessels or boats.

Art. 27. In obeying and construing these rules, due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special circumstances which may render a departure from the above rules necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.

Sound signals for vessels in sight of one another. Art. 28. The word “short blast " used in this article shall mean a blast of about one second's duration.

When vessels are in sight of one another, a steam vessel under way, in taking any course authorized or required by these rules, shall indicate that course by the following signals on her whistle or siren, viz. :

One short blast to mean : “I am directing my course to starboard.”
Two short blasts to mean : “I am directing my course to port."
Three short blasts to mean : “My engines are going full speed astern.”

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No vessel under any circumstances to neglect proper precautions.

Art. 29. Nothing in these rules shall exonerate any vessel or the owner, or master, or crew thereof, from the consequences of any neglect to carry lights or signals, or of any neglect to keep a proper look-out or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case.

Department of Marine and Fisheries.

Reservation of rules for harbours and inland navigation. Art. 30. Nothing in these rules shall interfere with the operation of a special rule, duly made by local authority, relative to the navigation of any harbour, river, or inland waters.

Distress signals. Art. 31. When a vessel is in distress and requires assistance from other vessels or from the shore, the following shall be the signals to be used or displayed by her, either together or separately, viz. :

In the day time :-
1. A gun or other explosive signal fired at intervals of about a minute;
2. The International Code signal of distress indicated by N.C.;

3. The distant signal, consisting of a square flag, having either above it a ball or anything resembling a ball;

4. A continuous sounding with any fog-signal apparatus.
At night :-
1. A gun or other explosive sigual fired at intervals of about a minute;
2. Flames on the vessel (as from a burning tar-barrel, oil-barrel, &c.);

3. Rockets or shells, throwing stars of any colour or description, fired one at a time, at short intervals ; 4. A continuous sounding with any fog-signal apparatus.

Rafts,—and Harbour of Sorel. Art. 32. Rafts, while drifting or at anchor on any of the waters of Canada, shall have a bright fire kept burning on then from sunset to sunrise. Whenever any ratt is going in the same direction as another which is ahead, the one shall be so navigated as not to come within twenty yards of the other, and every vessel meeting or overtaking a raft shall keep out of the way thereof.

a Rafts shall be so navigated and anchored as not to cause any unnecessary impediment or obstruction to vessels navigating the same waters.

Art. 33. Unless it is otherwise directed by the Harbour Commissioners of Montreal, ships and vessels entering or leaving the harbour of Sorel, shall take the port side, anything in the preceding articles to the contrary notwithstanding

Art. 34. The rules of navigation contained in articles 32 and 33, shall be subject to the provisions contained in articles 27 and 29.

Vide Canada Gazette, vol. xxx., p. 1735.

By Order in Council of the 1st of March, 1897, under the provisions of the third section of chapter 85 of the Revised Statutes, intituled “ An Act respecting Port Wardens," the port of Dalhousie, in the county of Restigouche, in the province of New Brunswick, was declared to be a port to which the said Act shall apply.

Vide Canada Gazette, vol. xxx., p. 1795.

Department of Marine and Fisheries.

By Proclamation under date of 2nd March, 1897, under authority of the Revised Statutes of Canada, chapter 86, and intituled “An Act respecting Harbour Masters," and of an Order in Council dated the 2nd March, 1897, the port of Chemainus, in the province of British Columbia, was designated as a port to which the said Act shall apply and the limits of the said port were declared to be as follow :

All the waters of Stuart Channel and all navigable waters connecting therewith inside of lines joining Hatch Point and Cape Keppel, Southy Point and Jostling Point, Reef Point and Yellow Point.

Vide Canada Gazette, vol. xxx., p. 1849.

By Order in Council of the 10th of April, 1897, in virtue of “The Fisheries Act,” chapter 95 of the Revised Statutes, the regulations respecting the oyster fishery established by the Order in Council of the 28th December, 1893, were amended by adding thereto the following clause, namely :

“ (10.) The use of drags or dredges for the purpose of taking oysters on any public bed in Prince county, in the province of Prince Edward Island, is prohibited, during the year 1897.

Vide Canada Gazette, vol. xxx., p. 2063.

By Order in Council of the 7th of May, 1897, section 2 of the regulations now in force in Canada, governing the shipping of live stock to Europe, was repealed and the following substituted therefor :

Space.

No. 2. Fat cattle carried on the upper or spar deck, or any other deck, must be given a space of 2 feet 8 inches clear in width by 8 feet clear in length, each, and not less than 6 feet 3 inches in height, (but pens for sheep shall not be less than 7 feet in height, divided into two compartments 3 feet 6 inches in height each); and in no case shall more than four head of cattle be allowed in each pen, except at the end of a row where five may be allowed together ; provided, however, that five cattle each 1,000 pounds weight or under commonly known as “stockers” may be carried in a pen instead of four fat cattle.

As regards space for sheep, not more than 8 or 10 sheep will be counted equal to ove fat ox, according to the discretion of the inspector. Cows in calf are to be given the same space as fat oxen.

Foreign Cattle.

United States cattle shipped from any port in Canada, carried on the upper or spar deck must be allowed a space of 2 feet 6 inches in width by 8 feet in depth per head, but such United States cattle when so shipped between decks must be allowed a space of 2 feet 8 inches in width by 8 feet in depth,

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