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FAMILY SERMONS.

chaelis, vol. ii

. p. 528.)

and really as to the other), between Matthew had done with respect to Christ and them both; much less Joseph, who was his supposed does it assert, that Joseph was the father: yet it is material to shew son of Heli

. It is true, Stephens's that the very words of Scripture do edition

, above quoted, gives some not place an express negative on countenance to our translation, by this construction, and this, I subputting no comma after iworio, so mit, is above effected.

K. making “ ulos iwono Törnd" run on together, as here printed; but this circumstance can, at best, only indicate what might have been Ste

No. XXXVIII. pleas's private judgment; but that We know how to estimate by the Col. iii. 2.-“ Set your afections on injudicious mauner in which his sub

things above." sequent edition of the New Testa. That man is fallen; that his nature meat, priated in 1551, frequently is changed from what it was, when divided the text inu verses, which he first came out of the hands of his bad not been done before that period, Maker, is not only told us with great and is not done in the above quoted plainness in Scripture, but is most edition of 1549 (see Marsh's Mis clearly to be drawn also from its

But I have doctrines and precepts. Consider in looked into four other Greek Testa- ibis view the precept in the text. Denis, each of which has a comma Why should it be necessary to urge after the word iwcip, and three of men to set their atfections on things them are very good editions ; the above? Is there ever any occasion firse, the London edition of 1633; to raise their desires after earthly of 1665, by J. Field; and the third, estate, for instance, feel indifferent ube Loadou of 1727, from the press to it?' So strong indeed are our deof Knaplock, Tonson, and Walls. I sires after earthly things, as to rebare rendered the word vos, “ de- quire that the law should say, “ Thou scendant," not only because it often shalt not covet.

But who is in danhas that sense (see Matt. I. 1, 20; yer of 100 eagerly coveting what is

II. 42, 45; Roan. ix. 27; Heb. vii. heavenly? This shews what is in 5; see also Parkhurst, Voc. Tios), but man.

The soul would not move because the connection evidently upwards to that glorious and excelmore deceptive than in any other, in- depraved. Hence arises the importhat our translation is, in this place, willingly, were not its moral feelings

; the whole of the words which are and certainly, under the proof we applied , but only the son," leave have of the natural tendency

of our ng us to conclude, that, in the ori. hearts to the earth, we ought to say Buod

, there are words corresponding with David, when we consider this with " which was;" but this is not subject, My soul cleaveth unto the case. It is impossible to con

the dust; quicken thou me according ceive that there can be a real con- to thy word.” With this view of tradiction between the two evan. ourselves, and depending on the progelists , because the words in Luke, mised assistance of the Holy Spirit

, " as was supposed," bear an evident let us now inquire; Ist, What are allasion to the miraculous concep- the things above? 2d, What it is to tion, as recorded by Matthew; and set our affections upon them. 3d, there can be no reasonable doubt but The motives and encouragements we Luke's account was meant to trace bave to do this. the genealogy through Mary, who I The things above" are things was the real mother of Christ, as spiritual, in opposition to things car. Christ. OBSERY. No. 122.

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comment on one of those interjected all his posterity: whereas the atone clauses (Rom. v. 15, 16, 17), of ment of Christ may be considere which St. Paul makes so much use, not as opposed to this single sin i and which, in many instances, take the man that committed it, and the ing their rise from his animated con- left to its natural course, but rathe ceptions of the divine scheme of as set in array against this sin bot man's redemption, are not the least in the first man and in all his de important parts of his writings. At scendants; each one of whom being the same time, their twofold charac- personally and individually a sin ter, as being both separate from and ner, each one must be regarded a allied to their respective contexts, having need of a special interposi subordinate to these and complete tion for his salvation; and whoever in themselves, renders them liable therefore, obtains salvation, as into a difficulty of interpretation. debted for it lo the special interposi

The guilt and condemnation tion of Christ. "And not as (is) brought upon mankind by the sin the transgression, so also (is) ihe of Adam, have their counterpart in free gift. For if by the transgresthe righteousness and justification sion of the one the many died, much superinduced by the alonement of er the grace of God, and the Christ

. If the former, by inconsi- gift by grace of the one man, Jesus deration, perverseness, and self-in- Christ, abounded unto the many." dulgence, attached to his posterity But further : the atonement of the displeasure of their Creator, and Christ may be considered not only a disposition of resistance against as set in opposition to the one orihis authority; the latter, by fore- ginal sin committed by the first thought, rectitude, and suffering for man, and carried on, by all his posthe sake of others, procured for his terity, but also as making head followers reconciliation to their hea- against it in all, its multitudinous venly Father, and a disposition of consequences, when, under various conformity to his will, "For as by forms, it has been repeated and rethe disobedience of the one man, repeated continually by each india the many were made sinners; so vidual. Hence there is no man but also by the obedience of the one, must confess, that having been, shall the many be made righteous." guilty of sins without number, for

But though the demerits of the each of which he is subject lo con first Adam, and the merits of the demnation; if he be accounted second, the misery occasioned by, righteous before God, it must be, the one, and the happiness wrought that for each particular sin of which by the other, are thus to be contrast- he has been guilty, a particular ed rather than compared; whạt ihe satisfaction has been made by Christ

. one is in respect of evil, suc's con- " And not as by one that sinned (is); frariwise being the other in respect the gift; for the judgment (was) from of goodl; yet, on taking into the ac- one (transgression) uplo condemnacount by what method the conduct tion : but the free gift (is) from of each tended to its opposite end, many transgressions unto justificaoccasion is found for comparison, and tion.” the result shew's that the advantage, As, then, the transgression of the in point both of energy and preci- first man, though thus comparatively sjon, is altogether on the side of the inert and undistinguishing in its efficiency of good. Now, the trans-, operation, has yet power to infix in gression of the first man may be those who feel its malignancy, the considered as an insulated sin, which, corroding fear of eternal deats: how without any further effort on the much rather may the atonement of part of the perpetrator, but merely the second man, thus absolutely in, by being left 1o take its natural its operation energetic and appror course, spread through and tainted priative, implant in those who, by

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experience of its present effects, treasure is there will your heart be have reason to believe that it is ex- also.— The light (or lamp) of the erted for themselves; that it enters body is the eye: if, therefore, thine into their own businesses and bo- eye be single, thine whole body will soms; how much rather may it im- be full of light (or be enlightened); plant in these the living and invi- but if thine eye be evil, thy whole goraling hope of life everlasting! body will be full of darkness (or be « For if, by the transgression of the in darkness). If, therefore, the light one, death reigned by the one; within thee be darkness, how great is much rather they that receive the that darkness?" In other words, abundance of grace, and of the gift: “ If the bodily eye be' sound or of righteousness, shall reign in life' vitiated, the whole budy is accordby the one, Jesus Christ."

ingly surrounded with light or darkF.T. ness. How much greater and more

momentous, then, is the darkness

which arises from the corruption of Tothe Editor of the Christian Observer.

the mind's eye; that internal light, on Your correspondent, Laicus, in the which depends our choice of spiriexposition which he has given in tual good or evil!” The leading anyour number for October last, of tithesis appears to me to be not so Matt. vi. 23, appears to me to have much between φως and σκότος, as misconceived the force of the pas- between Muros TioWuatos, and sage; and the translation which he

το φως το εν σοί; the latter phrase offers, is founded upon a manifest being, I conceive, equivalent to TS distortion of the original.

φως του πνέυματός σα. He renders the Greek as if it

D. M. P. stood thus: εi gv auto pcs 68 Sedburgh, 281h Nov. 1811. σκότος εςι, πόσον το σκότος το εν mu; whereas the reading is, ki šv TÒ φως το εν σοι σκότος εςι, το σκότος To the Editor of the Christian Observer. sirov; the literal translation of which is that given in our common

SHOULD the following hasty remarks version, viz. "If therefore the light be worthy of a place in your Mathat is in thee be darkness, how gazine, the author will feel honoured great is that darkness."

by your insertion of them., The expression, “the light that It may not be uninteresting to is in thee," js, it must be confessed, your readers 10 observe the very somewhat equivocal; and hence, different comments of Bishop Wilson probably, arose Laicus' misappre- and Bishop Tomlyn on Matt. ix. 13, hension of the passage: but a very

“ I am not come to call the righslight alteration in the turn of the teous, but sinners to repentance.” words may, I think, clear away all Bishop Tomlyn (vide Refutation, difficulty even to a mere English &c. 2d edition, p. 13), says, that reader. If they were rendered the

"the righteous," here spoken of, are light within thee" (as I think they

“ those who are truly and sincerely should be), would not the obscurity righteous; wbo have truly reformed be removed ? For the whole pas.

their lives; who carefully endeasage would then run thus: “ Lay

vour to abstain from all known sins, not up for yourselves treasures upon

and set themselves sincerely to the earth, where moth and rust corrupt; both to God and man, and so are

performance of their whole duty and where thieves break through and steal. But lay up for your righteous and acceptable in the sight selves treasures in heaven, where of God; in which sense Job was neither moth nor rust doth corrupt, righteous*, and eschewed evil; Za- . and where thieves do not break

• Job, however, does not seem to have through nor steal. For where

your regarded biinself as one of those righteous

I am,

charias and Elizabeth were righ- being sensible of the bondage teous, walking in all the commard- sin; and that religion must mend ments of the Lord, and Simeon; their corrupt nature before they die and so they needed not that repen- or they must never expect to b tance, which consists in the change saved." of the life from a course of sinning

&c. to a living unto God.” The bishop

PASTOR. had said, in the outset of his observations on the passage in question (p. 11), “ I am aware that commen

To the Editor of the Christian Observer tators, wbo wish to l'econcile this Tough I was pleased with the ingepassage to the Calvinistic system, nious paper of T. Y., in your number explain the word “righteous' by for December, I must confess it has those who consider themselves righe appeared to me that the most palpable tcous,"

disiiculty on this subject, and which Now, as Bishop li'ilson has never strikes the unlearned infidel with yet falien, I believe, under the atro- the most peculiar force, is the apcious charge of Calvinism, but is re- parent contradiction in terms (which garded as a sober-minded man by all T. Y. does not obviate) in the two who pretend to piety, I will subjoin accounts: the former asserting, that his interpretation of the words be- “ Jacob was the father of Joseph;" fore us, and let your readers decide and the latter, that “ Joseph was the which of these directly opposite ex

son of Heli.” This is considered as positions is to be preferred. Bishop an absolute contradiction, since the Wilson says (vide Works, 8vo. 3d same man cannot have two farbers; edition ; and ist vol. Sermons, p.

and therefore no ingenious hypo341, Serm. xvii.), “I came not'" thesis, to shew that one line is meant (says he), "ito call the righteous,' to trace the descent of Joseph, and such as think themselves safe, · but another of Mary, can obviate the sinners to repentance.”

verbal difficulty. I think, however, The bishop goes on to observe, in a little attention to the Greek text of the page following: “ This was the St. Luke will satisfactorily do it. It case of the church of Laodicea; runs thus, exactly as printed in the Thou sayest ihat thou art rich and edition of Robert Stephens, of 1549: wantest nothing, and knowest not “ και αυτος ην ο ιησους ωσεί ετων that thou art wretched and misera- τριάκοντα αρχομενος, ων, ως όνομίble, and poor, and blind, and naked.” So, viss 10, : waisa: " This" (continues Bishop Wilson), evl” And I would propose thus “is a sad case, and yet it is the case

literally to translate it: And Jesus (God knows) of too many Christians, himself began :o be about thirty as appears plainly by that great un- years of age, being, as was supo: concernedness to be seen in the lives posed t, the descendant of Joseph, of of Christians; who generally satisfy Heli

, of Matthat, of Levi,” &c. k. themselves, and place their hopes is certain the Greek text does not of safety and happiness in being (as our translation, I think, injudifree from scandalous sins, such as ciously does) assert, or, properly une the magistrate would punish; in oh. derstood, imply any thing as to the serving the outward duties of Chris. relative connection between Josepla tianity, such as the most unconvert and Heli, but only the connection ed* person may perform, without (according to supposition as to one, persons who had no need of repentance, London's last Charge appeared, wlich wages when he says, “I have heard of thee by the war with " conversions." hearing of the ear, but now mine eye secih' Renero” sbould be substituted for thee: I abhor myself, and repent in dust and se mend." e-hes."

+ This qualification is evidently weapt to * This was wrilten before the Bishop of apply to Juseph only.

and really as to the other), between Matthew had done with respect to Christ and them both; much less Joseph, who was his supposed does it assert, that Joseph was the father : yet it is material to shew son of Heli. It is true, Stephens's that the very words of Scripture do edition, above quoted, gives some not place an express negative on countenance to our translation, by this construction; and this, I subputting no comma after iworjo, so mit, is above effected.

K. making « υιος ιωσηφ τα ηλι” run on logether, as here printed; but this circumstance can, at best, only indicate what might have been Ste. FAMILY SERMONS. No. XXXVIII. phens's private judgment; but that we koow how to estimate by the

Col. iii. 2.--" Set your affections on injudicious inauner in which his sub

things above." sequent edition of the New Testa. That man is fallen; that his nature meul, printed in 1551, frequently is changed from what it was, when divided the text inw verses, which he first came out of the hands of his had not been done before that period, Maker, is not only told us with great and is not done in the above quoted plainness in Scripture, but is most edition of 1549 (see Marsh's Mi- clearly to be drawn also from its chaelis, vol. ii. p. 528.) But I have doctrines and precepts. Consider in looked into four other Greek Testa. this view the precept in the text. megts, each of which has a comma Why should it be necessary to urge after the word iwore, and three of men to set their affections on things them are very good editions ; the above? Is there ever any occasion firsı, the London edition of 1633; to raise their desires after earthly the second, the Cambridge edition things? Does the heir to a valuable of 1665, by J. Field; and the third, estate, for instance, feel indifferent ibe London of 1727, from the

press to it? So strong indeed are our de. of Knaplock, Tonson, and Watis. I sires after earthly things, as to rehave rendered the word vios, “de- quire that the law should say,." Thou scendant, not only because it often shalt not covet." But who is in danhas that sense (see Matt. i. 1, 20; ger of 100 eagerly coveting what is xxii. 42, 45; Roin. ix. 27; Heb. vii. heavenly? This shew's what is in 5; see also Parkhurst, Voc. Toos), but The soul would not move because the connection evidently upwards to that glorious and excelrequires it. I must further notice, lent state above, so heavily and unthat our translation is, in this place, willingly, were not its moral feelings more deceptive than in any other, in- depraved. Hence arises the imporasmuch as it does not printin Italics tance of the Apostle's exhortation; the whole of the words which are and certainly, under the proof we supplied, but only “the son," leave hare of the patural tendency of our ing us to conclude, that, in the ori. hearts to the earth, we ought to say ginal, there are words corresponding with David, when we consider this with " which was;" but this is not subject, “My soul cleaveth unto the case. It is impossible to con- the dust; quicken thou me according ceive that there can be a real con- lo thy word.” With this view of tradiction between the two evan- ourselves, and depending on the progelists, because the words in Luke, mised assistance of the Holy Spirit, • as was supposed,” bear an evident let us now inquire; ist, What are allusion to the miraculous concep- the things above? 2d, What it is to tion, as recorded by Matthew; and set our affections upon them. 3d, there can be no reasonable doubt but The motives and encouragements we Luke's account was meant to trace have to do this. the genealogy through Mary, who I. The things above" are things was the real mother of Christ, as spiritual, in opposition to things car. CHRIST. OBSERV. No. 122.

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