The Poetical Works of John Milton. Edited, with Introductions, Notes, and an Essay on Milton's English by David Masson, Nide 3

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F. Warne and Company, 1874 - 613 sivua
 

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Sivu 363 - I remember, the players have often mentioned it as an honour to Shakespeare, that in his writing (whatsoever he penned) he never blotted out a line. My answer hath been, Would he had blotted a thousand.
Sivu 456 - Repent; or else I will come unto thee quickly ; and will fight against them with the sword of my mouth.
Sivu 426 - Here, take this purse, thou whom the heavens' plagues Have humbled to all strokes : that I am wretched Makes thee the happier : heavens, deal so still ! Let the superfluous and lust-dieted man, That slaves your ordinance, that will not see Because he doth not feel, feel your power quickly ; So distribution should undo excess, And each man have enough.
Sivu 112 - This neglect then of rime so little is to be taken for a defect, though it may seem so perhaps to vulgar readers, that it rather is to be esteemed an example set, the first in English, of ancient liberty recovered to heroic poem from the troublesome and modern bondage of riming.
Sivu 458 - Dis's waggon ! daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty ; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath ; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength...
Sivu 505 - HOW oft, when thou, my music, music play'st, Upon that blessed wood whose motion sounds With thy sweet fingers, when thou gently sway'st The wiry concord that mine ear confounds, Do I envy those jacks that nimble leap To kiss the tender inward of thy hand, Whilst my poor lips, which should that harvest reap, At the wood's boldness by thee blushing stand!
Sivu 31 - THIS is true liberty, when freeborn men, Having to advise the public, may speak free ; Which he who can, and will, deserves high praise ; Who neither can, nor will, may hold his peace ; What can be juster in a state than this ? FROM HORACE.
Sivu 533 - And make those flights upon the banks of Thames That so did take Eliza, and our James! But stay: I see thee in the hemisphere Advanced, and made a constellation there ! Shine forth, thou Star of poets, and with rage Or influence, chide or cheer the drooping stage; Which, since thy flight from hence, hath mourned like night, And despairs day, but for thy volume's light.
Sivu 455 - These things saith he which hath the sharp sword with two edges ; I know thy works, and where thou dwellest, even where Satan's seat is : and thou boldest fast my name, and hast not denied my faith, even in those days wherein Antipas was my faithful martyr, who was slain among you, where Satan dwelleth.
Sivu 416 - Heaven is saintly chastity, that, when a soul is found sincerely so, a thousand. liveried angels lackey her, driving far off each thing of sin and guilt, and, in clear dream and solemn vision, tell her of things that no gross ear can hear; till oft converse with heavenly habitants begin to cast a beam on the outward shape, the unpolluted temple of the mind, and turns it by degrees to the soul's essence, till all be made immortal.

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