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State of the BAROMETER, in inches and decimals, and of Farenheit's THERMOMETER, in the open air, taken in the morning before sun-rise, and at noon; and the quantity of rain-water fallen, in inches and decimals, from Oct. 26. to Nov. 25. 1808, in the vicinity of Edinburgh.

Barom. Thermom. Rain. Weather.

In. Pts.

0.02

Oct.

M.

26 29.3 39

N.

50

27 29.35 40

49

48

28 29.4 41 29

29.72 31

47

30

30.15 33 46

31

30.48 40

47

30.32 30

42

2

30.25 43

48

3

30.35 43

50

4

30.3

42

48

5

30.

38

39

6

29.9

24. 40

7 29.85 32 39

8

29.82 38 42

9

30.1 40 44

42 44

43

10 30.1
11 30.11 42
12 30.1 29 40
13 30.1 24 32
14 30.01 29 43
15 29.5 38 51

0.03

16 29.1 54 56 0.04

39 4.4

0.02

42

0.15

41

39

17 29. 18 29.1 40 19 29,35 34 20 29.75 28 21 22 30.01 41 23 30.1 4.4 24. 30.15 34 42

29.5 38

41.

45

4.4. 0.02

25

31.0 33 42

Quantity of Rain, 0.74

|||||||||||

0.4

0.01

Showers

Clear

Ditto

Ditto

Cloudy
Clear

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto

Ditto Showers Clear Ditto Cloudy Clear Ditto Showers Clear Ditto Cloudy Showers

Ditto

Ditto

Rain

Clear

Rain

Showers

Clear

Showers Clear

Ditto

High Water at Lens For DECEMBER 1808.

Mora. Even.

H.M. H.M.

0 59

1 46

2 34

3 99

4 10

4 59

5 46

6 33

7 21

8 9

Days. Th. 1

Fr. 2 1

Sa. 3 2

2

0 36

22

10

58

46

33

23

18

57

7

45

Su. 11 8

33

M. 12 9

23

Tu. 13 10 15

W. 14

11 10

Th. 15

Fr. 16 0

38

1 9

Sa. 17 1

40

2 11

Su. 18 2

41 3 19 M. 19 3 41 4 10 Tu. 20 4 37 5 4 W. 21 5 29 5 51 Th. 22 6

Fr. 23 7

18 6 42 4 7 97 48 8 10

Sa. 24 7
Su. 25 8

31

8 53

14

9 $5

58

10 20

10 42

11 5

Th. 29

11 28 11 59 Fr. 30 0 16 Sa. 31 0 40 1 4 MOON'S PHASES For DECEMBER 1808. Apparent time at Edinburgh,

D. H. M.

Full Moon, S. 3.25. mon. Last Quar. 10. 9. 40. even New Moon, 17. 1.24. evens First Quart. 24. 4. Sl, evi

Su. 4

M. 5

3

Tu. 6

4

W. 7

5

Th. 8

6

Fr. 9 6

Sa. 10

M. 26 9

Tu. 27 9

W. 28

Dec. 10. Forth and Tay fishing begins 21. Shortest day. 25. Christmas day,

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8 58

9 49

10 42

11 38

08

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THE

Scots Magazine,

AND

EDINBURGH LITERARY MISCELLANY,

FOR NOVEMBER 1808.

Description of BLACKFRIARS CHAPEL, expeditione*." This expedition would ST ANDREWS. no doubt be promoted by the plunder of those famous edifices, which fell to

THIS ruin is situated in the ancient the share of the mob.

city of St Andrews, near the west end of the South or principal street, The convent here situated is generally understood to have belonged to the Dominicans, or Black friars; and to have been founded by Bishop Wishart in

1274. What now remains forms a mere ragrant, tho' extremely elegant in its EPI nce, with an arched roof. The ›uilding appears to have been ancienty of great extent. All the garden on he South side of the ruin, and of the resent grammar school (which stands mmediately contiguous to it) exhibits, when dug, the marks of having been uilt upon; and there are still standing, nd inhabited, on the same side of the treet, about forty yards west from the uin, some old houses which have much he appearance of having once formed art of the buildings of the convent. This convent, with all the other ne ruins of St Andrews, was demoshed in one day (in June 1559) in onsequence of a sermon of John Knox, hich moved the hearers with such eal, that "as weill the Magistrates, he Proveist, and the Commonalty, id agree to remove all monuments E idolatry, quhilk also they did with

Proceedings of the WERNERIAN Natural
History Society.

AT the meeting of this Society,

12th November, the Rev. Mr Jameson of St Mungo, Dumfries-shire, read a paper intituled, Observations on Meteorological Tables, with a description of a new Anemometer. After some general observations on the importance of meteorological observations, and on the merits and defects of registers of the weather, &c. he pointed out what he considered to be the best form of a meteoro'logical journal, and then described the external form and internal structure of an extensive and complete meteorological observatory, and enumerated about twenty different instruments, which ought to find a place in every establishment of that kind. He remarked, that a daily examination of the changes that take place in these. instruments, joined with a careful record of the external appearances in the atmosphere, will afford a constant and most fascinating employment to the

most

* Knox's reformation.

most zealous observer, and will in time enable us to form a just theory of meteors, to prognosticate with considerable accuracy the nature of the coming weather, and enable us to ascertain the climate of different countries, with the view of determining the influence it exerts on organic bodies. He next described an Anemometer which, by a very simple and ingenious arrangement of parts, will enable the most common observer to ascertain the velocity of the wind with perfect

accuracy.

At the same meeting, the Rev. Mr Fleming of Bressay in Shetland, (who has, for some time past, been engaged in examining the mineralogy of those remote islands,) communicated to the Society an interesting account of the geognostic relations of the rocks in the islands of Unst and Papa Stour, in the course of which he answered the queries formerly published in regard to the serpentine and sandstone of Shetland. After a general account of the position, extent and external appearance of the island of Unst, he next described the different rocks of which it is composed, in the order of their relative antiquity, and remarked that their general direction is from S. W. to N. E. The rocks are gneiss, micaslate, clay-slate, limestone, hornblenderock, potstone, and serpentine. The gneiss, in some places, appeared to alternate with the oldest mica-slate, and in others, to contains beds of hornblende-rock. The mica-slate, which is the most abundant rock in the island, is traversed by numerous cotemporaneous veins of quartz, and also of felspar, and passes distinctly into clay-slate.

Fleming is also inclined to believe that the serpentine of the neighbo ing island of Fetlar belongs to the same formation.-The island of Pa Stour, situated on the west coast of the Mainland (the name by which the largest of the Shetland islands known,) contains no primitive rocks on the contrary, it appears to be etirely composed of floetz-rocks Tee are conglomerate, greenstone, cla stone, porphyritic-stone, horste and sandstone. The sandstone, as 7pears from observations made in island and other parts of Shetland, would seem to belong to the ide coal formation. The claystone, co glomerate, porphyritic - stone, gre stone, and hornstone (probably cind stone,) rest on the sandstone. I some places, Mr Fleming obser the greenstone alternating with t sandstone: hence he properly cludes that they belong to the s formation. In no place, however, he observe any of the other rock alternating with the sandstone: therefore the formation to which they belong is still somewhat problemi We recommend the re-examination this interesting island to the zeala and indefatigable author of this p and as he announced to the Society his intention of again examining whole of the Shetland isles, and afce structing a mineralogical map, which the rocks should be laid d according to their relative antiq and their extent, we anticipate suc valuable information.

At the meeting of the Society the 19th November, Mr Make younger of Applecross, read a str account of the coal formation t vicinity of Durham. From the p cise and accurate description

COMCO

It contains beds of hornblende-rock
and of limestone. The clay-slate oc-
curs but sparingly in this island. The
poistone usually accompanies the ser-nicated by this gentleman, then
pentine. The serpentine occurs in
great abundance, in beds, in the oldest
clay-slate and mica-clate, and hence
must be referred to the oldest or first

appear to belong to the oldest c
formation of Werner. In the c
of his observations he explained vis
is called the creep by miners, and

serpentiue formation of Werner. Mr hibited specimens of the different rock

i

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