The Politics of Reclusion: Painting and Power in Momoyama Japan

Etukansi
University of Hawaiʻi Press, 1997 - 247 sivua
The Chinese themes of the Four Graybeards of Mt. Shang and the Seven Sages of the Bamboo Grove figure prominently in the art of Momoyama-period Japan (ca. 1575-1625). Kendall Brown proposes that the dense and multivalent implications of aesthetic reclusion central to these paintings made them appropriate for patrons of all classes - the military, who were presently in power, the aristocracy, who had lost power, and the Buddhist priesthood, who forsook power. These paintings, and their attendant messages, thus serve as dynamic cultural agents that elucidate the fundamental paradigms of early modern Japanese society.

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THE SEVEN SAGES AND THE Four
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TEA AND Politics
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THE SEVEN SAGEs
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David M. Cobb is a member of NANPA (North American Nature Photography Association), PPA (Professional Photographers of America), and GWA (Garden Writers Association). He lives in the Pacific Northwest with his wife and their two cats.

Kendall H. Brown is Professor of Asian Art History in the Art Department at California State University Long Beach. He also recently served as Curator of Collections, Exhibitions and Programs at Pacific Asia Museum. Dr. Brown is a leading figure in the study of Japanese gardens in North America and is the author of "Japanese-style Gardens of the Pacific West Coast".

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