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FROM THE GERMAN
OF FREDERICK J. JACOBSEN, ADVOCATE.

ALTONA, 1815.

BY

WILLIAM FRICK,

Counsellor at Law.

Baltimore:
PUBLISHED BY EDWARD J. COALE.

J. Robinson, printer.

1818.

District of Maryland, to wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on this Twenty-third day of February, in the ******** forty-second year of the Independence of the United States of America,

SEAL. Edward J. Coale, of the said District, hath deposited in this office ottamattoman to the title of a Book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor ; in the words following, to wit:

“ Laws of the sea, with reference to Maritime Commerce, during peace and war. From the German of Frederick J. Jacobsen, Advocate, Altona, 1815. By William Frick, Counsellor at Law."

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned.” And also to the act, entitled, “ An act supplementary to an act, entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of learning, by securing the copies of maps, charts, and books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned,” and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving, and etching historical and other prints.”

PHILIP MOORE, Clerk

Dietrict of Maryland.

L 1646

JUN 1 9 1930

PREFACE,

There is no department of political æconomy, the laws of which are required to be more simple, and more ably administered, than that which relates to maritime commerce and navigation ; and in proportion as their object increases must be their importance to mariners, merchants, jurists and statesmen. In no age, however, as in the present, has this truth been so rashly disavowed ; and in none has such an accumulation of errours and preju. dices prevailed against maritime commerce. Yet as in this respect, we conceive ourselves within view of a more promising futurity, much that long has been rejected may again be adopted, and much abuse that has hitherto prevailed may be reformed. Heretofore millions of property have been lost by nations, more through negligence and ignorance of what was law at sea, than by sacrifices which war rendered necessary. Thus, for instance, immense sums were lost by a single commercial house in Hamburg, during the blockade of the Elbe and Weser, because the parties had not informed themselves of the doctrine of England on this subject, as it had been previously settled by the earlier decisions of her courts.* Thus America

(*) Robinson's Reports, 5—78.

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