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APPENDIX F.

No. 6.

(Handed in by Mr. Bullock, Q. 988.)

TIMBER-LADEN SHPs-FOUNDERED, ABANDONED OR MISSING--Voyages.

Ships belonging to the UNITED KINGDOM and to British Possessions ABROAD, Years 1873 to 25th May 1894.

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sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost. sels. Lost.' gals, Lost.

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APPENDIX F.

No. 7.

(Handed in by Mr. Bullock, Q. 988.)

BRITISH TIMBER-LADEN VESSELS FOUNDERED, ABANDONED, or Missing in 1893.

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* Subsequently picked up and towed to port, but condemned. Only four of the timber-laden vessels which foundered or were abandoned or missing in 1893 belonged to the United Kingdom. Of these, one was bound from Mexico to Fleetwood with logwood, one from Pensacola to Queenstown with pitch-pine, and two were bound from Dantzic to the United Kingdom with pit-chocks and fir-wood respectively,

APPENDIX F.

No. 8.

(Handed in by Mr. Bullock, Q. 989.) NATIONALITY and other particulars of DERELICTS named on the Pilot Chart of the North ATLANTIC

for November 1893.

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Lat. 34° 03' N., Long.

76° 20' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 34° 00' N., Long.

75°00' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 34° 21' N., Long.

72° 10' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 31° 00' N., Long.

74° 50' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 30° 20' N., Long.

77°00' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 29° 50' N., Long.

72° 50' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 34° 00' N., Long.

76°00W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 29° 20' N., Long.

72° 45' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 27° 00' N., Long.

70°00' W., North
Atlantic.

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Lat. 26° 10' N., Long.

66° 10' W., North

Atlantic.
Lat. 21° 50' N., Long.

61° 30' W., North
Atlantic.

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Lat. 35° 15' N., Long.
50° 08' W.,

North
Atlantic.
Lat. 36° 10' N., Long.

49°00' W., North
Atlantic.

Robert P. Chandler

Schooner.

Bath, Maine, U.S.A. Capsized July

1893.

12.9.93

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No. 9.
(Handed in by Mr. Bullock, Q. 1597.)
(No. 4,905.)

hereto, that the loss of the vessel was caused through “ISLE OF BARDSEY”. (s.s.).

the master's not having correctly ascertained the exact

position of the vessel before altering the course to The Merchant Shipping Acts, 1854 to 1887.

W. by N. The Court finds him in default, but in conis the matter of a formal Investigation held at the sideration of the excellent character given to him Magistrates' Room, 107, Dale Street, Liverpool,

by the managing owner, suspends his certificate on the 24th, 25th, and 26th days of April 1894,

(No. 627,723), as master, for a period of three months before JOHN KINGHORN, Esquire, Deputy Stipen

only.

Dated this 26th day of April 1894. diary Magistrate, assisted by Commander BRAGG, R.N.R., and Captain ERSKINE, Nautical Assessors,

(Signed) John KINGHORN, Judge. into the circumstances attending the loss of the We concur in the above report. British steamship “ISLE OF BARDSEY," through

(Signed) striking on a rock about three miles east of Tarifa

Assessors.

WILLIAM ERSKINE,
Point, Spain, on the morning of the 29th March
last,

Annex to the Report.
Report of Court.

This was an Inquiry into the loss of the British The Court, having carefully inquired into the cir. steamship “Isle of Bardsey," of Liverpool, through cumstances attending the above-mentioned shipping striking a rock about three miles east of Tarifa Point, casualty finds, for the reasons stated in the annex Spain, on or about the 29th March 1894.

, }

Mr. Paxton appeared for the Board of Trade ; Mr. Hawkins represented the owners of the vessel; Mr. Dickinson the captain and the mates; and Mr. Walter Bateson watched the proceedings on behalf of other parties interested.

The “ Isle of Bardsey," official No. 97,751, was a British screw steamer built of steel by Messrs. John Redhead & Sons, at South Shields in the county of Durham, in 1890, and was registered at the port of Liverpool. She was 230 feet in length, 33-5 feet in breadth, with 16 feet depth of hold; had four water ballast tanks, and was schooner rigged; was fitted with triple expansion engines ; her gross tonnage being 1306-40 tons, and her registered tonnage 822.61 tons; and she was owned by the Isle of Bardsey Steamship Company, Limited, having its principal place of busi. ness at 35, Queen's Buildings, Liverpool, in the county of Lancaster, John Tudor Williams of the same address being designated as manager of the vessel on behalf of the owners.

The “ Isle of Bardsey” left the port of Carthagena, Spain, at 6 p.m. on the 27th March 1894, with a cargo of 1,900 tons of iron ore, bound for Mostyn, North Wales, her draught of water at the time of leaving port being 17 feet 4 inches forward and 18 feet 7 inches aft. She had a crew of 18 bands all told, and one passenger; her master, David Jobn Lloyd, holding a master's certificate, No. 027,723, and her first mate, William EO ards, also being the holder of a master's certi. ficate of competency, No. 027,724. There were three compasses on board : a standard compass on the upper bridge amidships, by which the bearings were taken and the courses were set; another in the wbeelhouse below, and one on the poop. There was also a deviation card on board which had been supplied when the steamer was built in 1890, and she had not been swung since then, but both the master and the mate stated that they had taken observations for deviation—the last of them for westerly courses on the previous voyage home-which were entered in a book kept by the master, which book had gone down with the steamer-the mate estimating the deviation at 1° 30' W. on the westerly points, and the master stating that there was very little difference between the compasses on the courses set, and that they were practically magnetic. There was also a patent log on board, but no hand log, and she had three boats, viz., two life-boats and a jolly boat.

At 9.30 p.m. on the 28th March, Europa Point Light was sighted, the course then being W. by S.; at 10.15 p.m. a four-point bearing was stated to have been taken by the mate—the vessel's speed at that time being reckoned at eight knot3-and at 10.45 p.m. Europa Point was abeam, estimated to be distant about four miles, the weather then blowing a fresh gale from S. by E. with a heavy sea and heavy blinding rain sqnalls. The course was then altered to W. S. magnetic, the steamer still going at full speed, and at 12.15 a.m. of the 29th March a bearing was got of the light on Carnero Point, on the opposite side of Gibraltar Bay, that light bearing N.N.E., and being distant from two-and-a-half to three miles. At this time, according to the master's statement, the vessel was within the white sector of the Europa Point Light, which clears the Pearl Rock, which lies south of Point Carnero. The course was then altered to W. by N., and the steamer kept on at full speed till about 12.45 a.m., when the master, who was on the bridge, but had got no report from the look-out, saw what looked like land and breakers ahead, and a little on the starboard bow. He then ordered the helm to be put “ hard-a-starboard,” and as the vessel came round and was heading W. by S. she struck something a heavy blow which did not stop her way, but she continued to come round with her head to the sea and eventually to E. by S. She was sounded, when it was found that No. 2 tank was full of water, that there was none in the fore-peak or fore-tank, but that there was water in the fore-hold, and afterwards in the stoke room. All the engine pumps were put on, and the vessel steamed head to sea towards Gibraltar, but the water gained rapidly, and in about half-an-hour the crew left the vessel in the two life. boats, and in about twenty minutes afterwards they saw her founder, and the crew then pulled for Gibraltar, where they arrived about 7 a.m. of the 29th March.

David John Lloyd had been master of the “ Isle of Bardsey" since 1891, and had been regularly engaged in running to the Mediterranean, baving in fact made 54 voyages there ; while the mate, William Edwards, had made 25 voyages to the Mediterranean. The master was on deck from the time of sighting Europa

Point Light till the vessel was abandoned; but tho bearings up to midnight of the 28th March were taken by the mate, and he stated that their rule was to take a four-point bearing of the principal lights they passed. He alleged that the first Europa Light bearing was got at 10.8 p.m. (though the master stated that he was told by him that it was 10.15 p.m.), that he consulted no clock, but that his watch indicated that time; that the log was not used either then or at any time during the night, but that he guessed her speed to be 8 knots as she was going full speed, and that there was a 2-knot current against them. He took no cross-bearings or Carnero and Europa Lights, both of which he had in view for over 11 hours, and took no cast of the lead at any time. All the witnesses describe the weather, at least from 10.45 p.m., as blowing a strong gale from the E., with a heavy sea, and raining heavily and very dark, the rain squalls travelling ahead of them and the weather getting clearer abaft; that they could see very little ahead-o.g. a ship’s length, 200 yards or more, and at most one mile. At about 11.30 p.m., when Carnero Light was stated to be abeam, they could not see it; at 12 midnight it bore two points abait the beam, and the white light of Europa Point was visible astern, At 12.15 a m. of the 29th March, when the captain took a bearing of Carnero Light, the time being taken by the second mate, the land could not be seen, though the light was visible, and the white light of Europa Point was still in sight, and continued so till within five to seven minutes of the time when the vessel struck; but Tarifa Point Light was never seen until after the vessel struck and was steered to the southward.

Thomas Jones, A.B., who took the wheel at 10 p.m., got the course W. by S., and kept that till midnight; Richard Evans, who relieved him at 12.3 a.m., continued the same course for about 20 minutes, and then by the master's order changed it to W. by N. At 20 minutes to 1 a.m. of 29th March he got the order • Hard-a-starboard,” and he got the vessel's head round to W. by S. when she struck—apparently underneath and abaft No. 1 hold ; she seemed to rise and then fall on something, gave two or three rolls, and then went on, and he brought her round to S.W., and steered that course for about 10 minutes, and then altered it to E. by. S.

At midnight of 28th March the engine room tele. graph indicated full speed, or 64 revolutions, but that had been diminished to from 60 to 61 revolutions, when she struck at from 12.30 to 12.40 a.m.; ten minutes later the order was given half-speed; then ten minutes later they were slowed down, and then put full speed again, when the pumps were attended to, and the water having come up to the level of the engine-room floor they had to leave. The second mate, who was on the bridge when the captain gave the order, “Hard-a starboard,” saw the high land and the breakers on the starboard bow and a little ahead, at a distince of from I to 1.9 miles; the first mate, who had been roused by the shock, stating that when he got on deck tho vessel was heading off the land, which was two miles off, and that he could see cliff's astern, but could seo nothing that they had struck upon, but he could sco Tarifa Light on the starboard quarter, and five minutes later Carnero Light—and that after coming up from tho wheelhouse, where he had gone to render assistance, ho saw Carnero Light and Tarifa Light on the port

Al! the witnesses, including thc master, stated that after they had got into the boats the weather cleared, and that they could see Tarifa, Carnero, and Europa Lights.

At the conclusion of the evidence the following questions were submitted to the Court by Mr. Paxton on behalf of the Board of Trade :

1. Were the errors of the compasses know?!, and the necessary corrections applied to the courses ?

2. Were proper steps taken to get the distance of the vessel from Europa Point when she was abeam:

3. Were proper steps taken to ascertain the position of the vessel before altering the course to W. by N?.

4. Was that a safe and proper course :
5. Ought the lead to have been used?
6. Was a good and proper look-out kept ?

7. What did the shipstrike, and what was her position at the time?

8. What was the cause of the casualty :

9. Was the master in default in regard to any of the abore matters ?

The Board of Trade state that in their opinion the master's certificate should be dealt with.

quarter.

Mr. Dickinson then called the managing owner of the 5. Had a proper course been steered, the depth of vessel, who stated that he had always found Captain water would render the use of the lead upnecessary. Lloyd to be a careful and reliable master; Mr. Dickinson 6. A good and proper look-out appears to have been afterwards addressed the Court on behalf of the master kept. and the mate, and Mr. Paxton having replied on behalf 7. It is the opinion of the Court that the vessel of the Board of Trade, the Court afterwards gave judg. struck one of the rocks in the picinity of Acebuche ment as follows:

Point. 1. The master stated that the errors of the compass 8. The casualty was caused by the master not having were known to bim, and that the necessary corrections correctly ascertained the exact position of the vessel were applied to the courses.

before altering ihe course to W. by N. 2. According to the master's and mate's statements, 9. The master was in default, but, having regard to a four-point bearing was taken off Europa Point Light, the excellent character given to him by the managing which was said to be four points on the starboard bow owner, the Court suspends his certificate as master for å at 10.15, and abeam at 10.45 p.m.; if the speed of the period of three months only from this date. vessel had been accurately ascertained, and the time Mr. Dickinson applied, on behalf of the master, that a correctly noted, this would be a proper means of mate's certificate should be granted to him during the approximately ascertaining the distance from Europa period of his suspension, and the Court recommends Point ou passing it; but as the speed of the vessel was that his request should be complied with. only estimated, the Court cannot say that proper steps

(Signed) John KINGHORN, Judge. were taken to ascertain the distance from that point when it was abeam of the ressel.

We concur in the above report. 3. No steps were taken to ascertain the position of the vessel before altering the course to W. by N.

(Signed) 4. Having regard to the state of the weather, W. by N. was not a safe and proper course.

Liverpool, 30th April 1894.

J. THRELFALL BRAGG, } Assessors.

APPENDIX G.

No. 1.

(Handed in by Captain Wharton.)

See p. 38.

FLOATING DERELICTS REPORTED or DEALT WITH by H.M. Ships between 1873 and 1894, so far as

ADMIRALTY RECORDS show.

H.M.S. Agincourt” in 1870 tried to destroy a schooner on her beam ends off the West coast of Portugal, but failed, merely blowing a hole in her, when it was seen that the cargo was wine in casks.

“ Zuleika," of Falmouth, in ballast, fallen in with by H.M.S.“ Immortalite” in latitude 44° 20' N. longitude 14o 50 W., March 1873.

H.M.S. “ Scylla” in October 1873 off the Azores fired at a capsized derelict for some time without effect, and finally blew a large hole in her by a charge; when a large number of heavy baulks of timber were released.

A large iron pontoon, fallen in with by H.M.S. “ Briton,

latitude 37° 5' N., longitude 15' 5' W., April 1881, destroyed and suuk by means of a torpedo.

'Kate," of Milford (grain). H.M. “ Scotia" left Plymouth in search of. Searched 21st Marcb. Found her on 22nd about 18 miles S. by E. from Start Point. Towed her into Devonport.

Dan and Mary,” of Carnarvon. Taken in tow by H.M. tug “Scotia 10 miles W.N.W. of the Senallo Light, 14th July 1882, and taken into Milford.

Stormy Petrel,” of Dublin, reported by one of H.M. slips in March 1887 in Bay of Biscay in the track of shipping. Noie. — This case caused permanent orders

to be inserted in Admiralty Instructions to destroy all derelicts.

Lucille," capsized derelict, reported by S.S. “Minerra” 60 miles S.W. of Scilly. H.M.S. “Pelican searched for her (as well as four tngs from Falmouth) from 30th December 1889 to 8th January 1890 without finding her.

A derelict. H.M.S. “ Buzzard” fell in with a small capsized vessel on 5th November 1891, about 490 miles to the N. of Barbados. Fired several shells into her, but failed to sink her.

An abandoned waterlogged barque with masts and sails standing, reported 150 miles W.S.W. of Scilly, was searched for by H.M.S. “Æolus” for several days in February 1894, but nothing could be seen or heard of her.

A small capsized derelict was fallen in with by H.M.S. “ Hearty

on 12th March 1894, just ontside the mouth of the Humber, and towed in.

At 6.30 a.m., 12th April 1894, H.M.S. “Buzzard" passed a derelict in latitude 29° 56' N., longitude 71° 40' W., masts gone close by the board, and vessel awash all except small part of poop and of forecastle. Too much sea to examine her. 3rd May 1894.

W. J. L. WHARTON.

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