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APPENDIX G.

No. 2.

(Handel in by Capt. Wharton. Q. 1875.)

DETAILS of Cases of the 76 DERELICTS stated in the UNITED STATES HYDROGRAFHIC OFFICE PUBLICATION »

No. 107 to have been set on FIRE—72 being thereby DESTROYED.

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51. German Bark “ China" passed, 1 March 1890, a vessel on fire, burned to water's edge. 52. British S.S. “Hungarian passed, 25 September 1890, a vessel " which had been on fire and was still smoking," going to

pieces. 53. British S.S. “Malaga” sighted, 26 September 1890, a vessel on fire, burned nearly to water's edge. 54. British Bark “Rachel Emery” saw, 25 November 1890, a vessel on fire, burned to water's edge. 55. “ Marguerite " sighted, 1 December 1890, a vessel on fire. 56. British S.S. “Lero” sighted, 1 December 1890, a vessel on fire five miles off ; “Saw foremast fall, and think she foundered

soon after." 57. Russian Bark “ Jupiter” sighted, 14 March 1891, a vessel on fire. 58. “ Charles Lülling" passed, 13 April 1891, a vessel on fire, burned nearly to water's edge. 59. British S.S. “ Borderer” passed, 28 July 1891, a vessel, lumber laden, burned to within five feet of water-line. 60. British S.S. “ Kingsdale” saw, 11 October 1891, a vessel on fire--probably cotton laden. 61. British S.S. “ Aymestry” saw, 12 October 1891, a vessel on fire. Fire had nearly reached lower bow ports. 62. British S.S. “ Almadine" saw, 1 November 1891, hull of derelict, with port bow part burned out and upper works all burner

away. A baulk of timber working through side. 63. German Bark “ Anna” say, 9 November 1891, a vessel on fire. 64. British S.S. " Ailsa Craig ” passed, 9 November 1891, a vessel on fire, burned nearly to water's edge. 65. British S.S. “ City of Dundee " passed, 12 January 1892, a vessel burning fiercely. Also reported by two other vessels. 66. British S.S. “Egyptian Monarch " sighted, 16 January 1892, vessel, with petroleum cargo, on fire. Also reported by S.S.

“Imperial Prince.” 67. British Bark “ Aqnatic” passed, 4 March 1892, a vessel burned almost to water's edge. 68. “Ida E. Latham” passed, 25 August 1892, a vessel burniug fore and aft. 69. “ Eliza J. Peudleton ” saw, 13 January 1893, two vessels close together--one on fire. 70. British S.S.“ Maude” saw, 1 September 1893, a vessel on fire, lumber laden. 71. “ Rebecca J. Moulton” passed, 2 September 1893, a vessel on fire. Vessel seen again 10 September 1893. 72. “City of Augusta" passed, 6 September 1893, a vessel burned to water's edge. 73. “Otago " passed, 15 October 1893, a burning vessel laden with pine lumber. Vessel seen again 17 October 1893. 74. “ Jamaican ”saw, 15 October 1893, a bark on fire. 75. Pennsylvania" passed, 17 November 1893, a vessel on fire all over. 76. “France Cherie' saw, 21 November 1893, a ship on fire.

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In seven of the above cases the vessels are known to have floated after the fire had burnt out.
With reference to the above it may be observed-
1. That none of the derelicts referred to were set on fire by vessels specially sent out for the purpose by the
United States Government.

2. That there is nothing to show (except in the case of the “ Alma”. [No. 9]) that the sinking was due to fire. The condition in which the vessels were abandoned (so far as given) might equally account for it.

3. Twenty-six of the cases (51 to 76 inclusive) do not seem to afford any evidence as to the value of burning as an agency for the effectual destruction of derelicts, as there is no proof that the vessels were derelicts when set on fire. August 1894.

W. J. L. WHARTON.

APPENDIX H.

(Handed in by Captain Rea, Q. 1066).

HYDROGRAPHIC BULLETIN published weekly by the U.S. HYDROGRAPHIC OFFICE.

No. 241.

Bureau of Navigation, Navy Department, Washington, D.C., April 11th, 1894. The object of the Hydrographic Office is to place *398.-Frying Pan Shoals Lightship bearing S.W. within the reach of mariners, at no expense to them, such f W. 16 miles : Stump of mast 3 feet out of water, useful information as cannot be collected profitably by apparently attached to a wreck, March 22. any private individual, but which the Government can CORRECTION.–Captain Bearse, of steamer Cherokee readily gather, without additional cost, through agencies reports that the suuken schooner that he passed 14 miles already established.

off Hatteras, on March 31 lay N. by E. from Cape Owing to the small scale to which the Pilot Chart Hatteras Light. is necessarily limited, much nautical information

Florida. received by this Office, especially such as concerns coasters, is omitted from that publication. This

April 6.-- The Lighthouse Board gives notice that on Bulletin will supply such omissions by giving an ou about April 20, 1894, Entrance to North-west account of obstructions and dangers along the coast Channel bell buoy, black and white perpendicnlar and the principal ocean routes, and publishing other stripes, will be moved about $ mile to the westward of matter relating to navigation, of interest to seainen. its present position, and moored in 27 feet of water on

It is compiled in the Division of Marine Meteorology the mid-channel line of the new or western entrance from reports received by our Branch Offices, Maritime

marked by Turning Point Beacon (red) and Sand Key Associations, Lighthouse Board, Coast and Geodetic Lighthouse in range. Bearings (magnetic) of proSurvey, Revenue Marine, Life-saving Service, Weather minent objects, fixing the position of the buoy, are: Bureau, newspapers, &c.

Key West Lighthouse, S. 45° 20' E. (S.E.); Turning These Bulletins will be posted in all the seaboard Point Beacon (red) and Sand Key Lighthouse, in range cities, where they can readily be consulted by masters S. 8° 23' E. (S. : E.); and North-West Pasgage Lightof vessels and others interested.

house, S. 0° 15' W. (S.). The maritime community is invited to send any On the same date, Black Beacon Shoal buoy No. 3 information of value to this publication, or the Pilot will be moved to the westward about on a line marked Chart, to the Hydrographic Office at Washington, or to by Port Shoal buoy No. 1 and South end of Spit brzoy one of its Branch Offices at

No. 5.
Boston
Customhouse.

On the same date, Ten Foot Shoal buoy No. 2 and New York

Maritime Exchange, Produce North-West Channel Bar bucy No. 1 will be
Exchange Buildings,

discontinued. Philadeiphia Maritime Exchange, Third

and Walnut Streets. Baltimore Customhouse.

DERELIOTS,, WRECKAGE, &c. Norfolk

Customhouse,
Savannah
Customhouse.

T'essels.
New Orleans
Maritime Asgociation.

410.–March 16.—Lat. 41° 10', long. 46o 09', passed San F:ancisco Merchants. Exchange.

a submerged vessel, barkentine rigged, masts showing Portlaod, Oregon Chamber of Commerce,

and saw many dead cattle floating about.-Helen (Br. 31, First Street.

S.S.), Mc Neil. Port Townsend . Customhouse.

418.- March 17.-Lat. 42° 12', long. 24° 37', passed a Chicago Room 1621, Masonic Temple.

large piece of wreckage Boating low in the water; These offices are fully supplied with information and

apparently part of a vessel's bottom.-Eden IIolme (Br. publications pertaining to navigation ; and masters and

bark), Randall. officers of vessels are cordially invited to consult

413.–March 26.-Lat. 489, long. 2,5°, passed a threethem.

masted derelict vessel.--Scawsby (Br. s.s.), Higgings.

410.–March 31.-Lat. 35° 50', long. 48° 30', passed a REPORTS ALONG THE COAST.

ship's deck, 150 feet long, with beams attached.--

Jamaican (Br. s.s.), Daniel.
New Jersey.

411.—March 31.-Lat. 32° 10', long. 69° 05', passed *394.-Absecon Light bearing West, 15 miles :

alongside of part of a ship's side 50 feet long, made of Upright mast, 8 feet out of water, apparently attached

spruce, with eight sets of iron knets attached and one to a sunken wreck. March 13.

'tween deck beam standing upright. The vessel was of 412.- March 14.– Five Fathoms Bank Lightship

about 500 tons.- Nora Wiggins (Br. bark), McKinnon.

414.--March 31.-Lat. 40° 25', Jong. 55° 14', passed % bearing N.N.W., about 1 mile distant, struck a wreck

vessel bottom up or shoal. -- Maggie M. Keough (sch), Tilton. NOTE.

415. —April 2 (?), lat. 37° 40', The chart shows 10 fathoms of water at the above

long. 70°, saw a raft or derelict vessel, with poles location.]

standing.--Kanawha (Br. 8.s.), Maxwell,

419.--April 8.- About 75 miles south of Hatteras North Carolina.

snoais, passed close to a ship's side, about 150 feet long

and nearly submerged.Louisiana (s.s.), Gager. *392--Kinnakeet Life-saving Station bearing West : Pern schooner sunk in 14 fathoms, with masts showing

Recently abandoned, March 14.

417.–Bark Lotus (Br.), Hire, of Pictou, 596 tons *399.-Cape Hatteras Light bearing S.W. by W., about 20 miles: Topmasts of a sunken tern schooner

sprung a leak aud foundered March 26, in lat. 42°, btanding out of water. March 22

long. 16'. Her crew was landed at St. Vincent by bark *405).–Cape Hatteras Light bearing S. by W.,

Orsola (Ital.), Paturzo. 14 miles: Tern schooner sunk in 14 fathoms, with

Buoys adrift. topmasts showing. March 31,

*369.-On Inner Diamond Shoal: Sanken steamer March 29.- Lat. 47° 33', long. 37°, passed a conical believed to be the Wetherby), with spars and funnel buoy, painted red.-- Lake Superior (Br. s.s.), Stewart. showing at low water. February 4.

March 30.–Lat. 42° 02', long. 56° 23', passed a red *334.-On Outer Diamond Shonl: Sunken steamer painted buoy.--La Bourgogne (Fr. s.s.), Lebæuf. (believed to be the Olympia), entirely submerged at April 5.—Lat. 40° 25', long 66° 43', passed a whistling low water, February 11.

buoy adrift.-Fürst Bismarck (Ger. s.s.), Albers.

• Republished in brief from a previous issue, with date of latest report.

Miscellaneous. March 14.- Lat. 39° 24', long. 64°, passed a number of balks of iimber and pari of a ship's deck, showing beams and upright timbers.-Barrow more (Br. B.s.), Waite; report by third Officer Taylor.

March 15.—Lat. 43°, long 48 20", passed a boat broken in two, painted white with tcak gunwale.-- Nerito (Rr. S.s.), Gordon.

March 28.-Lat. 41°, long. 53° 10', passed some large spars covered with barnacles. March 29, lat. 40°:30', long. 57 40', passed a large water barrel. March 30, lat. 39° 50', long. 62° 25', passed wreckage, apparently a vessel's stem with long bolts attached.--Massapequa (Br. 8.s.), Evans; report by second Officer Dickens.

April 2 - Lat. 26°, long. 63° 24', passed a big balk of timber, about 60 feet long; apparently not long adrist.

Capac (Br. 8.8.), Thomas ; report by second Officer Jones.

ICE REPORTS. March 14.-Lat. 42° 16', long. 51° 16', passed a berg 100 feet high.--Helila (Dan. S.s.), Laub; report by second Officer Schnipp.

March 14. - Lat. 42° 11', long. 51° 14', passed a large berg.-Ludgate Hill (Br. 8.8.), Brown.

March 22.-Lat. 44° 54', long. 46° 01', passed between two smallbergs; lat. 45° 4.5', long. 41° 15', passed another small one. - Ethiopia (Br. s.s.), Wilson; report by fourth Officer Miller.

March 25.—Lut. 43°, long. 45° 30', passed two large bergs.- Carthaginian (Br. 8.s.), France ; report by third Officer Cook.

March 26. – Lat. 42° 35', long 44° 32', passed a berg about 30 feet high and 800 feet long; lat. 42° 25', long. 44° 48', a berg 50 feet high and 1000 feet long. Massapequa (Br. s.s.), Evans: report by second Officer Dickens.

March 26.-Lat. 43° 02', long. 45° 54', passed a berg 25 feet high and 600 feet long.-America (Er. s.s.), Pearce.

March 26.- Lat. 43°, long. 44° 20', passed two small, low, jagged bergs. March 27, lat. 42, long. 49 10, passed a large round berg.-Bengore Head (Br. s.s.), Brennan; report by third Officer Orr.

March 27.–Lai. 43° 02', long. 45° 20', passed a large berz hollowed down the middle, also some detached pieces.—Peruvian (Br. 5.s.), Calvert; report by third Oficer Black.

March 27.–Lat. 43° 45', lorg. 46° 50', passed a berg 100 feet high and 400 feet long; also saw a large ope in lat. 43° 38', long. 47o. March 28, passed a large berg in lat. 42° 25', lorg. 49° 10'.- Massasoit (Br. 8.s.), Murray.

March 28.-Lat. 44° 22', long. 45°, passed a berg 100 fcet high, 300 feet wide and 410 feet long. March 29, lat. 13° 43', long. 46° 56', passed a berg 80 feet high and 150 feet long; between these two we saw two large bergs and three small ones.-La Hesbaye (Hol. s.s.), Ninues; report by Chief Officer E:khoff.

March 28.-- Lai: 42° 22', long. 49° 10' passed a large square berg of regular shape. - Italia (Br. s.s.), Craig: report by second Officer Wayman.

March 28.-- Lat. 43° 08', iong. 4-1° 26', passed a berg; lat. 43° 08', long. 44° 33', another.– Waverly (Br. S.s.), Calvert; report by Third Officer Clay:

March 28.-Lat. 43° 28', long. 45° 13', passed a small berg. March 29, lat. 42' 14', long. 46° 35', passed a large berg.-- Baltimore (Br. 8.s.), Simpson.

March 28, 29.—Lat. 44° 24', long. 45° 37', to lat. 43° 24', long. 47° 17', saw eight bergs, about 20 miles apart.- Toledo (Br. s.s.), Wishart.

March 29.-Lat. 43° 25', long: 46° 24', passed a large berg.-- Mohawk (Br. s.s.), Wiltshire.

March 29 - Lat. 43° 39', long. 45° 25', passed a berg. -La Bourgogne (Fr. 8.s.), Lebwuf.

March 20. Lat. 13° 28', long. 46° 20', passed a largo berg with a peak at one end 150 feet high. Diamant

(Ger. s.s.), Wischhausen; report by Chief Officer Kelterer.

March 29.-Lat. 43° 22', long. 47° 15', passed two large bergs each having two peaks; lat. 43° 10', iong. 48°20', two large flat berg::- Menantic (Br. 8.8.), Mann; report by Second Officer Grore.

March 29.-Lat. 43° 36', long. 45° 12', saw a small berg about 30 feet high and 30 feet long. March 30, lat. 43° 28', long. 45° 57', passed some field ice; lat. 42° 32', long. 18° 30', a berg about 25 feet high and 160 feet long. --- Amsterdam (Hol. s.s.), Stenger; report by Third Officer Last.

March 29.-Lat. 44° 35', long. 41° 29', to lat. 13° 5t', Jong. 46° 16', passed seven bergs of various sizes...-Cevic (Br. s.s.), Nicol; report by Second Officer Raddish.

March 29.-Lat. 43° 40', long. 46 28', posed to large borg3 with high peaks and two smaller ones, also, several small pieces of ice; lat. 42° 40', long. 48 15', passed two very large bergs with high white peaks.-Templemore (Br. 8.s.), Trenery ; report by Mr. Scott.

March 29.-Lat. 44° 05', long. 45° 31', to lat. 43° 45', long. 46° 43', passed seven bergs of moderate size.Wandruhm (Br. s.s.), Kuehn.

March 29.-Lat. 45° 10', long. 45 20', to lat. 44°03', long. 48° 18', saw numerous small and medium sized bergs, the larger ones being the westernmost.Batoum (Br. s.s.), Prout; report by Second Officer Colbeck.

March 29.-Lat. 14° 56', long, 46° 50', to Jat. 44° 39', Jong. 47° 59', passed eight large bergs.Lord Londonderry (Br. s.s.), Arthur; report by Second Officer Beal.

March 29.-Lat. 13° 25', long. 46° 27', saw a large berg:- Kanawha (Br. s.s.), Maxwell.

March 30.—Lat. 43° 50', lony. 45° 04”, to lat. 43° 38', long. 46° 52', passed six bergs 50 to 100 feet high, the largest ono being 600 feet long.Darmstadt (Ger. 8.s.), Thomann.

March 30.—Lat. 42° 50', long. 48° 40', saw a medium sized berg:- Taormina (Ger. s.s.), Koch.

April 1.-Lat. 13 25', long. 47° 05', passed a small berg.- Waesland (Blg. 8.s.), Bence; report by Fourth Officer Normon.

April 1.– Lat. 41° 56', long. 44°, passed a few small bergs and one large one.- -Luke Superior (Br. s.s.), Stewart.

April 1.-Lat. 43° 29', long. 46 28', passed a berg about 100 feet high and 350 feet long; lai. 43° 25', long. 46° 37', saw another berg, larger than the first.Schiedam (Hol. s.s.), Brouwer; report by Third Officer Feensma.

April 2.-Lat. 44° 22', long. 46° 26', passed a small berg and one of moderate size and some detached picces.Bostonian (Br. 9.s.), Muir; report by Second Officer Wright.

April 3. - Lat. 43° 49', long. 45° 58', passed a berg about 70 feet high and 250 feet long and one abont 15 feet high and 40 feet long.-- Oulam (Hol. s.s.), Ponsen ; report by Fourth Officer Wachter.

April 4. --Lat. 44°03', long. 45° 26', passed a large Lerg 200 feet high and about 500 feet long.-- Gallia (Br. s.s.), Hewitson.

Collisions wil Ice. Bark Armenia (Br.), Anderson, collided with an iceberg March 17, in lat. 41°, long. 48'. Damage not reported.

Stcamer R. F. Matthews (Br.), Arnott, from Mediterranean ports for New York, put into Halifax, April 8, with bows slightly damaged by field icc.

Steamer State of Georgiri (Br.), Laurie, met ico March 13, in lat. 18. 22', long. 45° 48', and did not clear it for five days, her progress being greatly impeded by it. There was a great deal of dargerous field ice and the vessel's plates were somewhat damaged on both sides.

CHARLES D. SIGSBEE, Communuter, U.S. N., II yılrographer.

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