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1st September 2nd September 3rd September 7th September 8th September 12th September 15th September 18th September 21st September 25th September September

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American three - masted Savannah schooner.

Southport American three - masted

schooner. British schooner

Bermuda American three - masted | Blewfields, Jamaica

schooner. American brig

Jacksonville American three - masted Southport schooner,

Boston

Frank M. Howes

British steamship Indianapolis. Tug Kate Spencer.

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Unknown.

Annie S. Conant

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.

Harold O. Beecher

Tug Hercules (?).

British steamship Atlantic. British steamship May.

Unknown.

Tug Jacob Paulsen.

Charleston

Prior to 15th October .

Catherine

15th October

Adorna

17th October

Julia A. Trubee

British bark

Cape Verde Islands Norwegian bark

Tybee Roads, Georgia
American three-masted Southport
schooner.

Savannah
British three - masted | Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

schooner.

25th October

Martie A. Holmes

Prior to 9th November

Moneta

Unknown.

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XII.-NUMBER OF DERELICTS DESTROYED.

22nd April 1888.-Found no wrecks along the New During the period 1887-93, inclusive, there were

Jersey coast except the bark Brimiga, which lies well 73 derelicts destroyed, 72 by fire, and one by torpedoes

np on Ephs Shoal, and is likely to stay there.—Lieut.

Cowles," U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Despatch. and ramming, viz. :

(Supplement to Pilot Cuart, 27th April 1888.) 22nd October 1893, the abandoned American three

20th June 1888.-Lieut. Cowles, U.S. Navy, commasted schooner Drisko, of 248 tons, lumber-laden and

manding U.S.S. Despatch, detailed to destroy the waterlogged, was sighted by the U.S.S. San Francisco.

wreck of steamer Eureka, sunk off the Virginia coast, It haring been found impossible to tow the derelict

states that he blew up the wreck, leaving 4 fathomi (the next morning), three 34-lb. gun-cotton torpedoes

of water as the least depth over the stumps of the masts, were attached to her keel and exploded, doing great damage, but leaving her still afloat. Five more

(Supplement to Pilot Chart, 22nd June 1888.) torpedoes were exploded under her keel, which broke 2nd August 1888.–Bark Brimiga, which drifted off her back and frames.

Ephs Shoal, New Jersey, 25th July, into deeper water, The San Francisco then rammed the Drisko violently near Cape Hay, where she was a dangerous obstruction amidships. The blow broke her in two parts, released to navigation, has been destroyed by U.S.S. Despatch, her cargo, and she commenced to sink.

As it was Lieut. Cowles, U.S. Navy, commanding. Her hull getting dark, and the derelict sinking, the San Francisco was blown to pieces with seven 100-lb. torpedoeg, fired à few shells into her stern, scattering her frag.

(Supplement to Pilot Chart, 3rd August 1888.) ments, and resumed her course to Key West.

5th August 1888.-In an official report to the Navy When last seen, the remains of the derelict were in

Department, Lieut. Cowles, U.S. Navy, commanding latitude 28° 15' N. and longitude 79° 17' W.

U.S.S. Despatch, states that he made a careful search

for the wreck of steamer Newcastle City, sunk near XIII. - EFFICACY OF DESTROYING DERELICTS BY FIRE.

Nantucket New South Shoal, but could find nothing of

her. 'The lightkeepers reported her gone, having The register of known derelicts shows that, during broken up during a gale. (Supplement to Pilot Chart, the past four years (1890–93), 45 derelicts, whose names 10th August 1888.) were known, were set on fire in order to destroy them. 30th November 1888.-In an official report to the Navy In one instance the fire failed to “take ” becanse the

Department, Lient. Cowles, U.S. Navy, commanding vessel was thoroughly water-soaked, having been adrift U.S.S. Despatch, states that he found and destroyed fully two years (the Fannie E. Wolston), and in three

the wreck of brig Hyperion, sunk 14 miles S.S.E, from other instances the fire went out before it got much Absecon Light, New Jersey. (Supplement to Pilot headway; but io 41 out of 45 cases the desired result Chart, December 7, 1888.) was obtained.

30th Norember 1888.-In an official report to the The cargoes, as far as known, were as follows :

Navy Department, Lieut. Cowles, U.S. Navy, Timber

17

commanding U.S.S. Despatch, states that he found and Rosin, &c.

2

destroyed a sunken wreck 15 miles east of Cape Henry, Ballast

2

Virginia. (Supplement to Pilot Chart, 7th December Cotton

1

1888.) Salt

1

7th January 1890.–Sunken wreck 6 miles S. } E. Powder

1

from Scotland Light-ship, New Jersey, was blown up Hides

1

and destroyed by Lieut. Commander_George A. Mixed merchandise

1

Bicknell, comnianding U.S. tug Nina. (Hydrographic

Bulletin 20, 17th January.)
Total

26

31st January 1891.-U.S.S. Yantic has destroyed the There were also 31 derelicts set on fire whose names masts of the sunken steamer Vizcaya and schooner were not known, all of which are believed to hare been Cornelius Hargraves, off Barnegat, leaving 12 fathoms destroyed.

of clear water over the two hulls. (Hydrographic The summary thus stands for four years (1890–93) :- Bulletin 75, 4th February 1891.) Numbər of derelict ressels set on fire: 76

16th February 1891.-The commanding officer of the Thereby destroyed

72

U.S.S. Yantic has been ordered to cruise along the Failores to destroy

4

coast from Sandy Hook to Charleston, S.C., and destroy, The cargoes of those four were, in three cases, timber;

as far as practicable, all abandoned wrecks which in the fourth not known.

are dangerous to navigation. (Hydrographic Bulletin, 11th February 1891).

23rd February 1891.—The sunken wreck on Five XIV.-WORK DONE BY UNITED STATES NAVAL VESSELS

Fathom Bank, off Cape May, N.J., was found by IN THE REMOVAL AND DESTRUCTION OF WRECKS AND

Commander Rockwell, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S. DERELICTS.

Yuntic. One mast was standing out of water, and it

was blown off by a torpedo, leaving a least depth of 10 The operations of United States naval vessels in the

fathoms in the vicinity. (Hydrographic Bulletin 79, destruction of wrecks and derelicts were as follows:

4th March 1891.) 16th October 1887.-U.S.S. Ossipee blew up wreck of 23rd February 1891.-Wreck of sunken schooner schooner Hattie A. White, sunk near Shinnecock, Long Minnie and Gussie, 14 miles south-east from Cape Island. (Supplement to Pilot Chart, 21st October

Henlopen, Delaware, was rendered harmless by having 1887.)

her masts blown off by the U.S.S. Yantic, Commander 12th October 1887.-A dangerous sunken wreck near

C. H. Rockwell, U.S. Navy, commanding. (HydroEgmont Key Light, Florida, was destroyed with graphic Bulletin 79, 4th March 1891.) torpedoes by U.S. revenue steamer Walter Forward, 21th February 1891.--A careful search was made for detailed for that purpose at request of Navy Depart- the sunken wreck reported 2 miles north-east of ment and guided by information furnished by the Fenwick Island Light-ship, without finding it, and Hydrographic Office. (Supplement to Pilot Chart, Commander Rockwell, commanding U.S.S. Yantic, 21st October 1887.)

reports it as his belief that the obstruction no longer 4th April 1888.-Lieut. Cowles, commanding U.S.S.

exists. (Hydrographic Bulletin 79, 4th March 1891.) Despatch, detailed to destroy wrecks along the New A telegram to the hydrographer from Commander Jersey coast, reports to the Department (a) that he C. H. Rockwell, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Yantic blew up the wreck of the sunken steamer E. C. Knight;

dated Fortiess Monroe, ath March 1891, reports the (6) that the danger buoy marking wreck of sunken

destruction of all the wrocks off Absecon, New Jersey. schooner Marietta Steelmun may be removed, as there is

(Hydrographic Bulletin 80, 11th March 1891.) nothing lest of her; (c) that sunken schooner Mary 13th March 1891.-Commander C. H. Rockwell, U.S. Heitman is no longer an obstruction, as he carefully Navy, commanding U.S.S. Yantic, reports with searched for her for three days without being able to reference to the two large masts seen 27th January 25 find her; also (d) that he saw many spars floating in miles S. } E, from Winter Quarter Shoal Light-ship, different positions and supposed to be attached to that a thorough search within 10 miles on either side sunken vessels, but upon sending a boat to examine of the vicinity has failed to reveal the obstruction. them, found them to be pieces of floating wreckage. He reports the same result with reference to the He reports the coast from Sandy Hook to Cape May submerged wreck seen 8th February 30 miles S. 75o E. clear of all obstructions. (Supplement to Pilot Chart, from Hog Island Light, Virginia, in 173 fathoms. 6th April 1888.)

(Hydrographic Bulletin, 81, 18th March 1891.)

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2nd April 1891.-U.S.S. Yuntic reports to the Navy 14th 0 tob.r 1893.-The spars attached to a sunken
Department that the wreck of sunken schooner Dudley wreck 14 miles E.N.E. } E. from Barcgat, New Jersey,
Farlin, about 24 miles north-east of Bodie Island, is not have been removed by U.S.S. Vesuvius, Lieut. Com-
to be found. He cruised in search of it for three days, mander Frank Courtis commanding. (Hydrographic
while furnished with the latest information regarding Bulletin 216, 18th October 1893.)
its location. He concludes that the recent heavy
weather has broken it up. The same conclusion may

16th October 1893.—(«) U.S.S. Vesurius blew up the

mast of the sunken light-ship 14 miles west of Five be reached as regards the two wrecks off Cape Lookout,

Fathom Bank Light-ship. The least water on the wreck North Carolina (Aberlady Bay and Glenrath). March is now 8 fathoms, and she is no longer an obstruction 30, a careful search during very favourable weather

to navigation. failed to reveal so much as a brake or swirl of water by which the whereabouts of the sunken steamers

(6) The Vesurius found the wreck off the New Jersey Aberlady Bay or Glenrath might be known, both of coast recently reported in latitude 39°05', longitude which lay off Cape Lookout. Wreck of schooner Mollie

73° 55', to be in latitude 39' 12' 30", longitude 73° 49' J. Saunders was located and marked by a buoy 31st

30", but owing to heavy weather could not blow up the March 7 miles south-east from Bodie Island, the weather

mast. being too rough to blow her up. (Hydrographic (c) A thorough search by the Vesurius failed to find Bulletin 84, 8th April 1891.)

the spar formerly reported 12 miles south-west of North28th March 1891.- The spar reported 12th December

east End Lightship. in latitude 33° 06', longitude 78° 28', and supposed to 16th October 1893.-Lieut. Commander Frank be attached to a sonken wreck, is not to be found. Courtis, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Vesurius, A search was made for it in that vicinity by made a thorough search for and inquiry after the Commander C. H. Rockwell, commanding U.S.S. supposed wreck formerly reported about a mile west of Yantic, and be thinks it has probably gone adrift. the Overfalls Buoy, Delaware Bay, but failed to find (Hydrographic Bulletin 84, 8th April 1891,

any obstruction

in that vicinity. (Hydrographic 5th April 1891.-Commander C. H. Rockwell, U.S.

Bulletin 217, 25th October 1893.) Navy, commanding U.S.S. Yantic, reports to the Navy 1st November 1893.-Lieut. Commander Frank Departinent that the wreck of sunken schooner Mollie Courtis, commanding U.S.S. Vesuvius, reported to the J. Saunders, 7 miles south-east of Bodie Island Light, Navy Departmeut that he had found and destroyed the which he marked with a wreck-buoy on 31st March is no wrecks of fishing schooner Empire Slute and schooner longer in sight. He made a very careful and thorough Narragansett, on the coast of New Jersey. He made search 5th April, the day being very favourable, but a thorough search for the other two wrecks reported could find no sign of her. He thinks she has either south-east of Navesink Lights, but failed to find them. rolled over or broken up. (Hydrographic Bulletin 85, Conversation with pilots, fishermen, and towboat 15th April 1891.)

captains established the fact that there were no other 14th April 1891.– The wreck of bark Ada P. Gould, wrecks in that vicinity. The Vesurius also made a sunk in 8 fathoms, three-fourths of a mile W. } S.

thorough search for wrecks south-east of Barnegat and from Cape Charles Light-ship, is no longer an obstruc

ran traverses over the ground for two days, without tion to navigation, having been blown up by Com

seeing any sign of them. (Hydrographic Bulletin 219, mander C. H. Rockwell, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S.S.

8th November 1893.) Yantic. (Hydrographic Bulletin 85, 15th April 1891. 7th November 1893.-Lieut. Commander Frank Cour25th April 1891.-Two obstructions to navigation,

tis, commanding the U.S.S. Vesurius, reported to the recently reported off Barnegat, no longer exist, having

Navy Department that he had destroyed the wreck on been removed by Commander C. H. Rockwell, U.S.

Stone Horse Shoal, Nantucket Sound, 2 miles E.S.E. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Yantic. (Hydrographic

E. (magnetic) from Handkerchief Light-ship, and that Bulletin 87, April 29, 1891).

there is now a least depth of 6 fathoms over it. This

wreck is believed to be the sunken schooner John P. 25th July 1891.- The upright spar recently reported

Kelsey, reported, 17th October by Capt. W. H. Bixby, near Cape Charles Light-ship has been blown up and

Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, as lying in 6 fathoms set adrift by Commander °C. H. Rockwell, U.S.S. Yantie. Careful soundings show 8. fathoms in the

of water, 15 miles E. 12° S. (magnetic) froin Handker. vicinity, and no other obstruction is in sight. (Hydro- Hydrographic Bulletin, No. 219, and numbered 71.

chief Light-ship, an account of which was published in graphic Bulletin 100, 29th July 1891.)

(Hydrographic Bulletin 220, 15th Noveinber 1893.) 16th September 18.11.-Comminder Pigman, U.S. 7th November 1893.—The U.S.S. Vesuvius, Lieut. Navy, commanding U.S.S. Enterprise, has informed the Navy Department that on 16th September Cape

Commander Frank Courtis, U.S. Navy, commanding,

proceeded to the coast of New Jersey and searched for Charles Lighthouse bearing W. S.W. & W. 23 miles, he

wrecks there, a description of which had been furnished discovered and blew up a large spar in 13 fathoms,

by this office. After running many traverses over the Hoating heel up, apparently held by wire rigging. (Hydrographic Bulletin 109, 30th September 1891.

locations given and covering much ground on all sides

without being able to find them, Lieut. Commander 1-1th June 1892.-U.S. tug Nina partly destroyed Courtis concluded that the locations were either dupli. wreck of steamer Florida sunk off Absecon. She cates and that the wrecks had been destroyed on exploded eight gun cotton and three powder torpedoes. former occasion, or that they had been broken up by The first strong easterly wina will probably complete recent gales. (Hydrographic Bulletin 220, 15th Novemthe dismemberment of the wreck. (Hydrographic ber 1893). Bulletin 146, 15th June 1892.)

3rd November 1893.--Commander A. S. Crowninshield, 7th June 1893.- U.S.S. Dolphin, Lieut. Buckingham commanding U.S.S. Kearsarge, reported that he in command, made an unsuccessful attempt to blow up anchored near the wreck of four-masted schooner John sunken schooner Robert Morgan, 12 miles E.N.E. } E. Holland, lying about 10 miles easi of Cape Henry, from Winter Quarter Shoal Light-ship, Virginia. Her Virginia, and blew up such spars as remained standing. masts remain attached by their wire rigging, and He also exploded several gun-cotton torpedoes on serve as spar buoys to mark the wreck. (Hydrographic different parts of the hull, tearing away many large Bulletin 200, 28th June 1893.)

pieces. The hull is badly worm-eaten and will soon be 4th July 1893. --The upright spar recently reported completely destroyed by the teredo. There is now a by various vessels about 8 miles east of Sandy Hook

least depth of 5 fathoms over the wreck in two places, Light-ship, was the mast of a square-rigged vessel, heel

and 7 fathoms at all others. (Hydrographic Bulletin up, and anchored by its rigging. It was found and

220, 15th November 1893.) blown to pieces by U.S.S. Fern, Lieut. Commander 13th December 1893.-Anaval vessel will soon be Gibson commanding. (Hydrographic Bulletin 202, detailed to search for and, if possible, destroy all wrecks 12th July 1893.)

and derelicts on her route from New York to the West 9th October 1893.--Lieut. Commander J. V. B. Indies. (Hydrographic Bulletin 224, 13th December Bleecker, U.S. Navy, commanding U.S. tug Iwanu,

1893.) reports that he reinoved the spars from a sunken 24th January 1824. – U.S. dynamite gun vesse) vessel 1 mile S.W. by W. W. (magnetic) from Vesuvius has been ordered by the Secretary of the Navy Chatham Whistling Buoy, Massachusetts. The spars to cruise along the coast and destroy the following were in 11 fathoms at low water, and careful soundings dangerous obstructions to navigation along the sea around them failed to show any other obstruction to coast of New Jersey, Delaware, and Virginia : No. 209, navigation. (Hydrographic Bulletin 216, 18th October sunken wreck inside of North-east End Lightship, show1893.

ing one upright mast; No. 201, barge Lizzie H., snnk in

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17 feet of water, about 600 yards N.W. by N. from McCries Shoal buoy; No. 253, sunken wreck showing stern out of water, 15 miles S. by W. 1 W. from Fenwick Island Lightship; and No. 251, a sunken wreck with one mast showing, 8 miles E. I S. from Cape Henry Light. The Vesuvius will then proceed to Hampton Roads to await further orders. (Hydro. graphic Bulletin 230, 24th January 1894.)

9th Decembar 1889.—Lieut. Cowles, in the Despatch, tried to blow up a derelict vessel, bottom up, about 35 miles east of the Virginia capes, but could not on account of her cargo of lumber. He cut holes in the hull and made fast a chain to tow her by, but she was held by her anchors. 12th December he went out to her again—two wrecking tugs had towed her a mile or two. Then the tug Argus and the Despatch together made fast to the derelict and towed her slowly to within 6 miles of the Capes by the evening of the 13th. Heavy weather delayed them some, and a diver had to cut the derelict's chains. By sunset, December 15, all were snugly berthed at Newport News. (Hydrographic Bulletin No. 16.) This proved to be the schooner Joseph Souther of Thomaston, Me. (Hydrographic Bulletin No. 17.)

3rd September 1890.-U.S.S. Petrel, Lieut. Commander W. H. Brownson, U.S. Navy, commanding, took in tow a derelict schooner, supposed to be the Henrietta, of Portland, Conn., and allowed her to ground about 300 yards sonth-east from Duck Island, Long Island Sound, in about 3 fathoms at half tide. (Hydrographic Bulletin 54, 12th September 1890.)

22nd October 1893.—The abandoned American threemasted schooner Drisko, of 218 tons, lumber-laden and waterlogged, was sighted by the U.S.S. San Francisco. It having been found impossible to tow the derelict, the next morning three 34-pound gun.cotton torpedoes were attached to her keel and exploded, doing great damage, but leaving her still afloat.

Five more torpedoes were exploded under her keel, which broke ber back and frames. The San Francisco then rammed the Drisko violently amidships. The blow broke her in two parts, released her cargo, and she commenced to sink. As it was getting dark and the derelict sinking, the San Francisco fired a few shell into her stern, scattering her fragments, and resumed her conse to Key West. When last seen, the remains of the derelict were in latitude 28° 15' N. and longitude 79° 17' W. (Hydrographic Bulletin 218, 1st November 1893.)

XVI.-NUMBER OF VOLUNTARY OBSERVERS CO-OPERATING

WITH THIS OFFICE. This number is constantly changing. There is a list of 3.033 persons who co-operate, but these do not all send in reports regularly. In some cases there have been long intervals of several years between reports, owing to the vessel being laid up under repairs, &c.

The number of observers whose barometer cards are kept on file for constant use is 2,136.

XVII.-NUMBER OF HYDROGRAPHIC BULLETINS AND

PILOT CHARTS ISSUED. The edition of Weekly Bulletins is constantly being increased to meet the demands, from branch offices cbiefly. The edition published at present is 2,040 every week, of which 2,000 are issued from this office, the remainder being kept on file.

The edition of the Pilot Chart has also been constantly increasing, and is now 4,000 every month; 3,419 were issued last month.

XVIII.- ESTIMATE AS TO THE SOURCES OF REPORTS RELATING TO WRECKS AND DERELICTS RECEIVED BY THIS OFFICE.

Out of 500 reports, 216, or 43.2 per cent. were from newspapers; 147, or 29.4 per cent., were from Form No. 105; 62, or 12: 4 per cent., were from telegrams to maritime exchanges ; 53, or 10.6 per cent., were from branch Hydrographic offices direct; and 22, or 4.4 per cent., were from letters and special reports.

Summary of Wrecks destroyeil by U.S. Naral Vessels

along the Atlantic Coast of the United States, 1887– 1893, inclusive.

UPON

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XIX.-AN ACCOUNT CF THE SYSTEM OF REGISTERING, FILING, PUBLISHING, AND ACTING

REPORTS OF WRECKS AND DERELICTS, WITH SPECIMEN RePORT OF A DERELICT, ILLUSTRATING THE VARIOUS STEPS

TAKEN BY THIS OFFICE. A serial number is immediately attached to each wreck and derelict report. It is then plotted on a blackboard (which shows the North Atlantic to 60° N.) When the name of the derelict is not recognised by the reporting authority, it may nevertheless frequently be identified by comparing it with other reports. This is always atteinpted before publication.

The report, with serial number annexed, is then published in the Hydrographic Bulletin and shown graphically on the next Pilot Chart. After publication the report is entered in one of two registers. The first register contains only those reports in which the name of the derelict is known ; the other book contains those whose names are not known, and these are further separated according to rig, &c., and entered under the following heads :

(a.) Ships and steamers.
(b.) Barks and barkentines.
(c.) Brigs and brigantines.
(d.) Schooners and small craft.
(e.) Unidentified rigs.
(f.) Bottom up.

(9.) Miscellaneous. In order to trace the complete track of a derelict whose name is unknown and facilitate finding it in the register, each report is registered with an identifi. cation number” in addition to its serial number, such identification number to be the same as the first serial number of that particular derelict.

Each derelict whose name is known has a separate place or page in the register, devoted to that vessel alone.

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To return to the day on which a report is received. Should a wreck or derelict be within striking distance of an available naval vessel, a memorandum of the report is sent by the Hydrographer to the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, whereupon the proper orders for search and destruction issue.

A typical report is selected to illustrate the course of proceedings, viz. :--

Pinkham ; reported by second officer Frederiksen, on Form 105."

This report was received during the week ending 13th December; the serial number 154 was assigned to it; it was plotted on the “derelict blackboard,” a memorandum was sent to the Chief of Bureau on 13th December, the report was published on the Hydrographic Bulletin No. 224, 13th December, and shown graphically on the January Pilot Chart, together with path of drift ; and entered in the register of known derelicts, page 410. It was expected that the Depart. ment would order the Kears ge to search for and destroy the obstruction on her voyage to the West Indies.

Specinien Report. * 154. Nov. 6, 1893. Lat. 38° 28' N., long. 68° 34' W., saw the abandoned tern schooner Charles E. Young, with bowsprit and masts standing.-Urbino (Br. S.S.),

APPENDIX.

ADDITIONAL REPORTS OF COLLISIONS WITH DERELICTS.

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Damage slight. April 4th, 1889, schooner Lizzie Carr struck a dere. lict or wreckage 40 miles east of Bodie Island, N. C., and received slight damage.

June 15th, 1889, barge Galatea struck a sunken wreck near the Chesapeake capes, causing her to leak.

Juue 25th, 1889, schooner J. F. Becker struck a sunken wreck off Fenwick Island, with little damage.

September 25th, 1892, steamship Massilia collided with a large derelict in latitude 36° 55' N., longitude 45° 15' W., and damaged one of her bow plates.

Damage not known.

Damage considerable. March 4th, 1889, schooner Wm. B. Wood struck a sunken wreck and had to be beached on the Delaware coast.

January 7th, 1891, schooner Helen G. King struck a sunken wreck near Rockland, Me., and had to put into Eastport in a sinking condition.

November 30th, 1891, steamer St. Enoch struck a submerged derelict in latitude 48° N., longitude 33 W., and had to return to Queenstown with all the blades of her propeller broken.

December 28th, 1891, schooner Riviere struck a derelict on the voyage from Dublin to Bangor and had to beached on arrival.

October 25th, 1892, steamship Britannia struck a sunken wreck off Cape Sable and had to be beached for temporary repairs.

April 23rd, 1893, schooner A. T. Coleman struck a sunken obstruction on the voyage from Baltimore to the Bahamas and was towed into Norfolk with a hole in her bottom.

June 23rd, 1859, steamship Ville de Montevideo was damaged by striking a derelict on the voyage from Rio Janeiro to Havre.

May 11th, 1891, brig Arthur was damaged by striking a derelict on the voyage from Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, to Martinique.

July 25th, 1891, steamship Castlegate was damaged by striking a wreck near Boston.

December 22nd, 1893, schooner Theodore Dean, on a coastirg voyage to New York, arrived damaged by haring struck a wreck.

December 26th, 1893, tark Guldrein was damaged by striking a derelict on the voyage from Canada to Fleetwood, England.

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