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N. A Freaction Vlashington 26.

24. April 1869.

SERMONS

ON CERTAIN OF

THE LESS PROMINENT

FACTS AND REFERENCES IN SACRED STORY.

BY HENRY MELVILL, B.D.

MINISTER OF CAMDEN CHAPEL, CAMBERWELL, AND CHAPLAIN TO THE TOWER OF LONDON;

FORMERLY FELLOW AND TUTOR* or st. PETER'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE.

NEW YORK:

STANFORD & SWORDS, 139 BROADWAY.

PHILADELPHIA:
GEORGE S. APPLETON, 148 CHESNUT-STREET.

1844.

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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1843, by STANFORD & SWORDS, in the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York.

NEW-YORK:
Printed by Daniel Fanshaw,

SERMON I.

THE FAITH OF JOSEPH ON HIS DEATH-BED.

By faith Joseph, when he died, made mention of the departing of the children of Israel, and gave

commandment concerning his bones.”—Hebrews, 11 : 22.

We have often occasion to point out | ing places, so far as difference is alto you what a difference there is in the lowed between the two. standards by which God and men judge

e Ye is this latter fact on which we now the relative worth or importance of chiefly wish to fix your attention. Take, things. In one great sense, indeed, for example, our sins. We deny that there cannot be to God any of those there can be such a thing as a sin distinctions which exist to ourselves; which is small in God's sight; forasfor, wondrously exalted as He is, things much as sin, from its very nature, must must be equal in his sight, which differ be of infinite guilt, because committed in ours in many respects and degrees. against an infinite Being. But this is It is undoubtedly to forget the im- not saying that there are no degrees measurable distance of the Creator in sin, as though God regarded all from the creature, to imagine that He crimes as of equal enormity. One sin who sitteth in the heavens, swaying may be greater than another in the the universal sceptre, regards as great, Divine estimate, as well as in the huand as small, just what are reckoned man; and yet God may account no sin such in our feeble computations. There small, however ready we may be to ought to be nothing clearer than this think this or that inconsidérable. And if our great and our small were great what we are disposed to reckon triand small to God, God would be little fling, may be precisely that to which more than one of ourselves, judging by God would attach the greater crimithe same measures, and therefore pos- nality; so that, as we have said, great sessing only the same faculties.

and small may change places, and Yet, though the distinctions made by where both God and man admit a difGod must not be thought the same with ference, you may have to reverse the those made by man, we are not to con- judgment of the one to find that of the clude that God admits no differences other. Sins of the mind, for instance, where differences are supposed by our are ordinarily thought less of than sins selves. We are evidently in error, if of the flesh; pride incurs but slight we think that what is great to us must reproof, whilst sensuality is heavily debe great to God, and that what is small nounced. Yet the proud, perhaps, ofto us must be small to God: but it is fers a more direct insult to God, and not necessary, in order to the avoiding more invades his prerogative, than the this error, that we should confound sensual; and thus his offence may be great and small, or compute that in the more hateful of the two in the sight God's sight they must be actually the of the Creator, whilst it receives, comsame. They may not be the same ; paratively, no blame from the creature. they may be widely separated: and Accordingly, there is nothing of which yet none of them may be great to God, God speaks with greater loathing than none of them small: whilst, moreover, of pride: the proud man is represented the Divine estimate may be the reverse as the object of his special aversion.' of the human, great and small chang. "God resisteth the proud.” So that

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