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RATES OF FREIGHT FROM NEW-YORK TO HAVRE, (ON FOUR LEADING ARTICLES,) FROM

JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1860, FOR THE FIRST WEEK IN THE MONTH, BOTH INCLU

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RATES OF FREIGHT FROM NEW-YORK TO GALVESTON, FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1860. Gen. Merchandise,

Gen. Merchandise. Frst week in per cubic foot.

First week in per cubic foot. January,...

7 cts.
July,.....

7 cts. February

7
August,...

7March,

7
September..

7 April,

7
October,

7 " May,

7
November,

7 " June,

7
December,

7

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Rates of FREIGHT FROM NEW-YORK TO HAVANA, FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1860,

BOTH INCLUSIVE,

50 @

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Machinery under deck,

$ 6 00 @ $ 800 per ton. Hoop iron,...

6 00 @ Paving stones,

1 50 @ 3 00 Bricks,.....

10 00 @ 14 00 per M. Plaster or cement,..

40 @

624 per bbl. Potatoes, apples, onions,.

75 Ale,..

62 @ 87 Oil, (per bbl. of 32 gallons,).

62 @ 75 Spirits of turpentine,..

75 @ 1 00 Carboys of acid on deck,.

1 50 @

2 00 Hoops,..

6 00 @ 8 00 per M. Sugar, molasses, shooks with heads,.

26 @ 37 Paper, straw,....

2 @

3

per ream. Measurement goods,.

8 @ 15 pr, cubic foot. For the comparative rates of freight for the year 1859, see Chamber of Commerce Report, pp. 21-22.

RATES OF FREIGUT FROM New-YokK TO VERA Cruz, FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1860,

BOTH INCLUSIVE.

One uniform rate the year round.

Cocoa,...
Machinery,..
Hardware,
Straw-paper,
Cindainon,..
Cloves,

1 ct. per lb.
30 cts. per cubic foot.
30
10 cts, per ream.
30 cts. per cubic foot.
30

THE TEA TRADE FOR THE YEAR 1860.

GREEN teas opened at rather low rates, early in 1860, and ruled without change to the 15th February, 1860.

From that date ordinary and medium grades began to advance, the upward movement continuing to the first of September, at which time the rise in prices of common qualities Hyson, were equal to 30 per cent. ; Young Hyson, Hyson Skin and Twankay, 50 per cent., and Gunpowder and Imperial, 25 per cent upon the opening rates. Good and fine grades participated in the advance 10 to 15 per cent., while the choice varieties (of which the season's import contained an unusually large proportion) remained without material change. From September 1st to the end of the year (the last two months of which were marked by more than ordinary dullness in the tea trade) no material change in prices occurred, except a decline in the fine grades of 7 to 10 per cent.

Blacks opened at about the average rates of the last ten years, and prices continued without alteration to the 1st of March.

From that date to the 1st July the market for common and fair grades gradually improved, until an advance on the opening rates was realized of 15 to 20 per cent. on Oolong, Ankoi and Orange Pecco, 20 to 30 per cent. on Souchong and Congou, and 10 to 20 per cent on the various kinds of Powchongs.

From July to the end of the year the tendency of prices was to a lower scale, the market finally closing at about the opening prices, except for Souchong and Congou, the common qualities of which were still quoted about 20 per cent. above.

STATISTICS OF THE TEA TRADE-IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED STATES FOR THE CALENDAR

YEAR 1860.

Greens. Blacks. Japan. Total.
lbs.
lbs.
lbs.

lbs. Estimated stock, January 1st, 1860,....... 1,639,520 8,807,818 .

5,417,833 Receipts from January 1st to Dec. 31, 1860,.... 17,023,920 15,575,603. 865,306 82,964,829

16,669,440 19,383,421 865,806 38,412,167 Estimated stock, December 31, 1860,..

2,365,000 5,834,582 50,000

8,249,832 Apparent consumption,.....

16,293,440 .. 13,548,559 .. 315,506 .. 80,162,385

EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC GOODS TO FOREIGN PORTS FROM NEW-YORK FOR ELEVEN YEARS.

Yeurs. 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853, 1854,

i'kgs. 24,412 41,820 60,496 40,468 17,784 12,834

Years.
1856,
1857,
1858,
1859,
1860,..

Pkgs. 27,656 25,972 47,796 51,848 54,461

1855,..

EXPORTS OF TEAS FROM THE SEVERAL PORTS OF TUE UNITED STATES DURING THE FISCAL

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1860. (Official.)
Ports.

Pounds.

Value. New-York,....

2,008,241

$ 604,344 Ningara,

1,174,149

579 816 Boston,

676,640

208,750 Champlain,..

497,912

183,474 Oswego,

258,749

126,141 San Francisco...

240.756

61.847 Passamaquoddy,

117.531

36,348 Buffalo,..

116,414

73,245 Philadelphia,

56,884

26,855 Baltimore,

61,470

24,245 Richmond,

47.930

24,178 Oswegatchie,

68,967

20,710

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IMPORTS OF TEAS INTO THE SEVERAL PORTS OF THE UNITED STATES DURING THE FISCAL

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1860. (Official.)
Porls.

Pounds.

Value. New-York,..

28,387,743

$ 8,270,901 San Francisco,

1,350,362

345,810 Boston,..

854,647

186,915 All other ports,...

454

145 Total United States,....... 30,593,106

$ 8,803,771

OPERATIONS OF THE U. 8. ASSAY OFFICE, NEW-YORK,

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2d

FINE BARS MADE BY MELTER BULLION SENT TO TIIE MINT
FIXE GOLD Bars.
AND REFINER.

FOR COINAGE.
Paid Depositors. Gold.

Silver.
Gold.

Silver, 1860. 1st quar.,

$ 696,085 31 $ 4,195,423 32 $32,602 27 $2,746,002 25 $ 68,569 09

437,209 54 .. 678,760 78 .. 67,504 24 222,479 50 77,694 39 3d

519,755 38 636,713 13 37,854 35 113,541 47 29,945 50 4th

318,871 44 5,765,521 57 115,781 02 .. 8,772,811 30 101,987 64

$ 1,971,921 67 $ 11,276,418 80 $ 253,741 88 $ 11,854,834 52 $ 278,196 61 1861. Ist quar.,

$ 169,093 65 $8,376,174 74 $ 50,317 62 $ 19,484,603 06 $ 496,829 85

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* $15,150,000 of the above gold deposits, in foreign coins, such as Sovereigns, Napoleons, Thalers, &c. VOL. XLV.-NO. III.

18

COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS.

DUTIES LEVIED IN SCINDE. From the monthly circular of Messrs. Farnham & Co., dated Kurtachee, May 8th, 1861, we learn that the duties now levied in Scinde (or Sind) are as follows:

New Import Duties.-Cotton thread, twist and yarn, piece goods, haberdashery, hosiery and millinery, oilman's stores, provisions of all kinds, perfumery, spices of all kinds, tea and coffee, jewelry, plated and plated ware, and all articles not enumerated below, pay 10 per cent.

Tobacco, eight annas per seer (2 lbs) on unmanufactured, and one rupee per seer on manufactured. American tobacco comes under the head of manufactured.

Ale, beer, porter, cider and other similar fermented liquors, 4 annas; wines and liquors, rupees 2; and spirits, rupees 3—per imperial gallon.

Bullion and coin, pearls and precious stones, unset, grain of all kinds, horses and other live animals, ice, cotton, wool, flax, hemp, jute, machinery, chalk, coal, coke, bricks, maps, prints, works of art and hides, free.

New Export Duties.—Saltpetre two rupees per Indian maund (82 lbs.); indigo, three rupees per Indian maund; grain and pulse of all kinds, four annas per bag of 164 lbs.; lacdye and shellac, four per cent.

Bullion, precious stones and pearls, books, maps, prints and works of art, horses and other live animals, cotton, wool, flax, hemp, jute, sugar, rum and spirits, tobacco, raw silk, opium, under a permit, free. All articles of export not enumerated above pay

three

per

cent. [Kurrachee, or Karachee, is the principal seaport town of Scinde, on an inlet of the Indian Ocean, eighteen miles from the west branch of the Indus. Latitude 23° 47' 3" N. The harbor is the only port along this coast for vessels drawing more than ten feet of water.]

American Imports-Drills.—We are without stock, and there are none on the way. We have constant inquiries for boot and Laconia markslatter preferred. Sbirtings, sheetings, blue drills, cotton flannel, &c., are in constant demand for small quantities.

Tobacco.—Just at present the market is rather quiet, 14 annas 6 pies to 15 annas per lb. for good quality half pound lumps, and 11 annas to 11 annas 6 pies for 108. of good quality are fair quotations.

There is a great deal of inferior tobacco in the Bombay market. Some of this description of tobacco has found its way into this market, and we would suggest to the parties in America who contemplate trying the Kurrachee market that it will be for their interest to confine their shipments to the very best marks. Mould in tobacco is very detrimental.

THE COOLIE TRAFFIC. The following letter from Paris purports to describe the views of the French government as to the results to be obtained from the clause of the treaty with China legalizing the exportation of labor. It is not known if the writer speaks from authority, and if his extremely sanguine anticipations and inferences are shared in official quarters :

“ It will be seen by the late advices from China that this government, in their treaty with the Chinese, have legalized the exportation of coolies.

This has been done, no doubt, in reference to obtaining a supply of labor for the cotton lands in Algeria.

“The great immorality of the Chinese adults heretofore imported has caused the subject to receive a careful and earnest attention, and a plan has been proposed to import boys and girls brought out under the care of priests and sisters of charity, who, on receiving them in China, will cleanse and clothe them, and begin immediately a religious and secular education.

On arrival in Algeria and being distributed among the planters they will retain their teachers, and be ready with their little fingers to pick the cotton balls as they ripen. The cultivation of the land is to be effected with steam-ploughs and horsehoes, as in this way an enormous area can be kept under culture at a small expense. The yield of cotton (as in the United States) being limited only by the number of pickers, cotton may be thus grown at half the cost of the American, owing to the difference in the value of land and slaves.

* In the year 1855 five bales of cotton were brought to Paris from Algeria, of the best quality, but the want of an organized system of labor similar to the slave system of the States caused the culture to be abandoned for a time. The great im. provements in agricultural machinery have now removed this difficulty in part, and the importation of coolie children will supply all that is required to insure success at the present time.

“The children are to be apprenticed for twenty years, and to be always under supervision. When the picking season is finished, they are to be employed in raising their own food, and in weaving and making their clothing. At the end of their apprenticeship they can marry and become citizens, with an allotment of land, or return to China, as they please.

“Such, briefly, is the scheme, which will no doubt be adopted by England, and carried out in British Guiana and the other cotton lands in her extended colonies. That there is not a scarcity of cotton lands in the world, the application of the steam-plough with the coolie emigration will soon prove. Within five years France and England will raise at least half the cotton they use; prompted not only by the independence that this supply will give them, they will be urged on to the work by the great missionary enterprise which it will inaugurate.

** The organized labor of the rail-road system has rendered familiar the carrying out of great land operations with facility and rapidity, and four hundred children to a single ship will soon people the plantations when ready to receive them. I subjoin an article from the Moniteur, just published, which shows the enormous increase in the consumption of cotton in France in the past year, from which you will infer the solicitude of the government to engraft its cultivation upon the soil of the empire:

*** We published on the 19th inst, the comparative tables drawn up by the Administration of Customs and of indirect taxes, presenting the imports and exports of the principal kinds of merchandise. The first fact that attracts attention is the large increase in the importation of certain raw materials destined for French manufacturers. Cotton, of which the quantities that paid duty were, in 1858, 715,000 metrical quintals, (2214 lbs. each,) and in 1859 739,000, attained in 1860 the enormous figure of 1,160,000 quintals. Even when deduction is made of the quantities sent abroad, there remain 1,083,070 quintals—that is to say, 344,000 more than the quantity consumed in the corresponding period of 1859.9"

TREATIES WITH JAPAN. Lord Elgin has recently visited Scotland, and in a speech delivered at Dunfermline he described his official visit to Japan, and gave an ac

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