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have been reduced and simplified. They show the charge either in kilogrammes or pounds, and include all the numerous imposts that, in the absence of such a system, have hitherto been found especially vexatious. For all weights over 200 lbs., there will be a uniform rate per 20 lbs., without any limit to the weight of consignments. One item may be quoted from the scale as illustrating the cheapness at which commodities may be conveyed between the two capitals, namely: for an ordinary parcel of 2 lbs., 1s. 4d., all charges included where no duty or entry. The French customs authorities have consented to permit the landing or shipping of the goods immediately on the arrival of the boat or train, without any detention at the port, the examination and other custom-house formalities being performed in Paris. This concession is the more important, as the boats must necessarily perform the voyage at night, so as to save time and allow until the afternoon of each day for the despatch of parcels from either metropolis, and it obviates the necessity for the detention which would otherwise arise to the traffic in awaiting customs' hours at the port. It may be hoped that the English customs will follow the example and extend a similar permission, which they have long since given as regards registered baggage, and in a modified form for small parcels, and thus enable the railways to afford the public still greater rapidity of transit, the most important element in continental traffic. As it is, consignments delivered at London-bridge station in the afternoon will reach their destination in Paris on the following day, and, vice versa, thus completing the transport in twenty-four hours. The new arrangement has taken effect.

PACIFIC MEXICAN COAST TRADE.

Announcement is made in the San Francisco papers that the steamship Panama would leave that port, May 1st, for San Blas, Mazatlan and Guaymas, touching at Cape St. Lucas. It is expected she will afterwards ply regularly between those ports, carrying specie, freight and passengers, and connecting regularly once a month with the Pacific Mail Company's steamers at Manzanillo or Acapulco. This arrangement will prove of immense advantage to the present and future trade of San Francisco with Mexico, and will also be of great service to the foreign merchants established there, as the want of a regular mail and specie carrying service has long been seriously felt. The Alta says:

“We hope every encouragement will be extended to this enterprise by our merchants engaged in the Mexican trade; and we know, that as soon as the steamer has made a few monthly trips, in accordance with the programme, such confidence will be felt in the arrangement as will not only insure the liberal patronage of the Mexican government and people, but will undoubtedly prove this new steamship line a most profitable one to the enterprising proprietors."

FRENCH TREATY WITH TURKEY.

The commercial treaty lately concluded between the French government and the Porte is to be valid for 28 years, with power to the con

tracting parties to propose modifications at the end of 14 and 21 years. The existing customs' tariff is to endure for seven years only from the 1st of October next. This treaty confirms all the rights, privileges and immunities previously accorded to France. Foreign merchandise destined for Servia, Moldavia and Wallachia, is to pay customs duties only on entering the Principalities, and French houses exporting the produce of the Principalities will pay the customs duties into the hands of the Moldo-Wallachian or Servian administration. No duty is to be paid on merchandise passing through the Straits, even should it be temporarily landed on the Turkish territory. The duty charged on merchandise imported into Turkey for the purpose of being sent to other countries, has been reduced to 2 per cent., and will be further lowered to 1 per

cent. in eight years. French subjects are not permitted to import tobacco and salt into Turkey except on payment of the same duties as the Turks pay. Tobacco and salt, the produce of Turkey, are not to be subject to the payment of duty on being exported. French subjects are not permitted to import firearms, gunpowder or warlike stores, but fowling-pieces, pistols and arms for ornament are not included in the prohibition.

FRENCH WINES. The quantities entered for home consumption for the first five months of this year, compared with the corresponding period of the two previous years, are as follows: 1859, 266,965 gallons; 1860, 535,995 gallons ; 1861, 1,129,775 gallons ; showing an increase over 1859 of 862,810 gallons, or 18,756 hhds.; and over 1860, of 593,780 gallons, or 12,908 hhds. Such an increase is wholly unprecedented, thanks to the commercial treaty and the reduction of the duty. The greatly reduced prices have, no doubt, greatly contributed to this result, and will go to verify the predictions of the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

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THE PERSIAN AMBASSADOR ON COTTON FROM PERSIAN ARABIA. The following is a translation of a letter addressed to the President of the Royal Asiatic Society, by Mirza JAFER Khan, ambassador from His Majesty the Shah of Persia to the Court of St. James :

• From the circumstance that this well-wisher passed the springtime of his life in this island, and received at that time numerous marks of friendship and kindness, from great and small, among the natives of this country, he has, therefore, always been animated with a desire for the welfare and advantage of the British nation. At this present moment, by reason of the events occurring in the United States of America, a great deal of anxiety and discussion is to be observed as prevailing among the owners of cotton mills. Some have recommended Zanguebar or Australia—others, again, India and various places—as most fit for the cultivation of that most useful product; but this well-wisher takes the present opportunity to demonstrate his friendly feelings, by suggesting to the president of the Royal Asiatic Society that the province of Khuristan, now known by the name of Persia Arabia, is, from the circumstances of its vicinity to the sea, the fertility of its soil, the number of rivers—as, for instance, the Kerkha, the Karan, (Karun,) the Jarrahi,

Behbehan-better adapted than the aforenamed countries—that is to say, in fact, the very best place for the cultivation of cotton. From the foot of the mountain ranges of Luristan, Arabistan and Behbehan, as far as the shores of the Persian Gulf and of the Shattee-'l-'Arab, extends a vast country, the greater part of which is capable of being cultivated so as to produce any required quantity of cotton, sugar, opium or indigo. Even as things are at present, and in spite of the want of capital and of special knowledge among the people of those parts, a portion of the lands in question are cultivated near Shuster, Dizful and Fellahigga. It is related by the Arabian historians that, at the time when the dyke of the Karun, near Aliwak, formed a source of prosperity to the environs, it was customary to place on the dinner table of the Caliph at Bagdad, every evening, a tray of bread, with a thousand pieces of gold, as derived from the revenue of that district. For this reason the district received the appellation of “Selletu-'l-Khubz,' ;. e.,

bread-basket. Besides this, the ancient name of that region in the old Persian language is Khuzistan, and “Khuz' means "sugar.' By reason of its producing immense quantities of that product, the country became known as Khuzistan, i. e., 'Sugarland ;' and it is evident that the manufacturers of England may easily and speedily obtain from those regions any desired quantity of good and beautiful cotton. Many English travellers have visited those parts, and viewed them from one extremity to another, and have become well acquainted with its circumstances. From them, too, the truth may be learned. In short, should the ideas above set forth meet your approbation, the best thing to do would be to transmit a notice to the cotton-manufacturing firms, in order that they may appoint an agent with whom the necessary stipulations on both sides may be discussed, and a definitive understanding come to in the matter."

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SUGAR AND COFFEE TRADE. We are indebted to the monthly circular of Mr. H. E. Möring, NewYork, for the annexed particulars : Imports of Foreign and Domestic Sugars, from January 1st to August 31st, and from September 1st to December 31st.

TOTAL OF THE FOUR Ports. N. York, Bost'n, Phila., Balt., Months.

1861. 1861. 1861, 1861. 1858 1859. 1860. 1861. January, tons, 7,160 2,042 852 298 11,703 13,141

9,577 February,

13,425 4,244 1,891 1,114 16,498 20,247 18,197 20,174 March,

80.241 4,106 3,467 8.619 82.594 88,277 81,167 41,483 April,

29,918 8,841 8,462 2.744 87,239 45,632 47,727 89,457 May,

43,074 5,976 5,439 1,163 86,038 42,961 52,031 05,632 June,

23,136 2,096 2,520 670 86,661 43,409 45,661 29,922 July,..

16,252 2,833 826 408 29.859 82,646 52,262 25,319 August,

12,250 1,344 1,298 245 82,545 18,920 40,282 15,127 Total in 8 months,.

175,748 25,982 18,775 10,456 235,437 259,183 296,410 230,961 September,..

15,711 9,612 27,915 October,

10,903 7, 586 19.149 November,

8,011 8,076 12,110 December,

11,002 11,742 8,679 Total in 12 months,....

291,064 295,429 864,463

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Stock of Sugar at the Four Principal Ports of the United States of America, on the

1st September, 1861.

TOTAL TOxs.

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Stock in

1858.
1859.
1860.

1861. New-York,

32,248
56,291
78,055

46,900 Boston,

6,755
9,187
14,541

11,451 Philadelphia,

4,449
7,491
5,458

1,880 Baltimore,..

8,297
5,870
11,052

3,326 Total, 1st September,..

46,749
78,259
109,106

63,557 1st August,..

27,983
86,907
95,050

82,076 Decrease,

8,618

18,519 Increase, 18,766

14,056 Imports, Stocks and Distribution of Sugar in the Four Principal Ports of the United

States. Imports up to 31st of August.

1858. 1859. 1860. 1861. Arerage. New-York,

tons, 165,659 183,247 204,886 175,748 182,884 Boston,

28,351 28,012 88,458 25,982 80,201 Philadelphia,..

21,897 28,140 26,710 18,775 23,580 Baltimore,

19,535 18,784 26,856 10,456 18,770 Total,..

235,437 258,133 296,410 230,961 255,235 Stock, January 1st,...

16,108 15,333 24,140 56,394 28,198 Total Supply in eight months,..

253,540 273,466 820,550 287,355 283,728 Deduct Stock, September 1st,

46,749 78,289 109,106 63,557 74,425 Distribution in eight months,.

206,791 195,177 211,444 .. 223,798 209,803 Monthly Average,..

25,849 24,397 . 26,481 27,978. 26,168 Stocks, Receipts and Distribution of Sugar in the Six Principal Markets of Europe,

up to 1st August. Stock, 18t August.

1858. 1859. 1860. 1861. Average. Holland,..

tons, 15,250 10,000 5,500 19,250 12,300 Antwerp,

1,600 2,400

600

2,950 1,888 Hamburg,..

1,500 8,500 4,500 6,500 4,000 Trieste,

8,150 6,150 2,450 2,050 8,450 Havre,... 1,000 7,100 6,150 6,600

5,212 Great Britain,

100,050 80,600 118,800 129,800 107,062 Total, August 1st,.

122,550 109,750 187,500 .. 166,650 134,112 July 1st,......

127,400 113,150 155,950 149,950 136,611 Receipts and Deliveries of Sugar in Six European Markets.

1860.

1861. Total Stock, January 1st,

tons, 125,250

90,850 Receipts up to August 1st,

879,150

460,500 Total Supply for seven months,.

504,400

601,350 Deduct Stock, August 1st, .

187,500

166,650 Distribution in seven months,..

866,900

884,700 in July,

72,800

71,550
Receipts

88,250
IMPORTS OF COFFEE, FOUR YEARS.
Year
Year
Year

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54,850

8 mos., 1858. 1859. 1860

1861. New-York,

tons, 41,501

41,630
82,648

87,120 Boston,...

8,339
6,835
4,147

2,929 Philadelphia,..

10,310
12,907
6,699

6,065 Baltimore,

14,498
16,837
12,591

8,236 New Orleans,

23,874
26,061

20,442 Total,...

98,522
104,270
76,517

63,970

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Stock of Coffee at the Five Principal Ports of the United States of America, on the

1st of September, 1861. Stock in

1858.
1859.
1860.

1861. New-York,

tons, 4,755

6,888
1,982

10,850 Boston,.....

926
1,587

218

1,878 Philadelphia,

774
312
674

526 Baltimore,

1,070
1,956
1,072

1,043 New-Orleans,..

2,500

714
429

86 Total, 1st September,

10,025
11,457
4,870

18,858 1st August,...

6,051
11,545
3,033

14,211 Decrease,

88

828 Increase,..

8,974

1,337
Total on hand, 1st September, 1861.
Brazil,

bags, 160 lbs.,

156,083 St. Domingo...

180

9,776 Laguayra,

110

6,328 Maracaibo,

120

12,743 Bombay,

150

600 Costa Rica,

120

817
Jamaica,..

150
Ceylon,
bags and mats,

11,543
Java,

bags, 180

4,257 Singapore,..

mats, 60

24,792 Imports, Stocks and Distribution of Coffee in the Five Principal Ports of the United States. Imports up to 31st of August.

1858. 1859. 1860. 1861. Average. New-York,..

tons, 27,903 80,901 20,082 87,120 29,002 Boston,

4,476 5,288 8,219

2,929 8,978 Philadelphia,

6,620 9,133 4,379 6,065 6,549 Baltimore,...

8,714 10,787 7,215 8,236 8,725 New-Orleans,.

12,284 16,984 11,282 9,620 12,530 Total,..

59,947 73,043 46,177 63,970 60,784 Stock, January 1st,

22,740 8,910 18,595 9,149 18,598 Total Supply in eight months, ..

82,687 81,953 59,772 73,119 74,382 Deduct Stock, September 1st,

10,025 11,457 4,870 18,888 9,984 Distribution in eight months,

72,662 70,496 55,402 59,236 64,448 Monthly Average,.. 9,083 8,812 6,925 7,405

8,056 Stocks, Receipts and Distribution of Coffee in the Six Principal Markets of Europe,

up to the 1st August. Stock, 18t August.

1858. 1859. 1860. 1861. Average. Holland,

tons, 46,400 40,350 81,400 23,050 85,300 Antwerp,

4,800 2,750 2,700 8,800 8,387 Hamburg,

10,500 6,500 6,500 11,000 8,625 Trieste,

3,600 2,050 2,500 4,050 8,050 Havre,

8,900 4,750 6,150 8,600 5,850 Great Britain,

10,700 7,500

7,750 7,100 8,387 Total, August 1st,

79,400 61,200 57,000 57,600 64,549 July 1st,.

81,600 59,150 66,500 52,550 62, 149 Receipts and Deliveries of Coffee in Six Markets of Europe.

1860.

1861. Total Stock, January 1st,.

tons, 52,250

45,100 Receipts up to August 1st,.

111,300

124,550 Total Supply for seven months,.

164,050

169,950 Deduct Stock, August 1st,.

57,000

67,600 Distribution in seven months,..

107,050)

112,850 in July,..

18,2550

12,650 Receipts

18,750

17,700

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