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IMPORTS OF HIDES AT THE PORT OF NEW-YORK FOR THE YEAR 1860.

Compiled from the Weekly Official Tables of tho Shoe and Leather Reporter. FOREIGN. Jan. Feb. March April May. June. July. Aug. Sept.

Oct. Noo.

Dec. Total 1860. Total'59. Total '58. Bahia, 180

130 47,508 15,719 Bathurst, (African,). 11,460 6,050

3,737 940

100

4,255 26,542 26,690
Buenos Ayres,..
99,894 17,249 25,502 7,922 14,034 8,200 81,790

19,355 6,138 2,104 26,907 263,364 470,393 304,915
Cartbagena,

2,280
55

878 3,379 27,821 Chagres,

8,851 7,188 6,012 5,975 8,925 4,157 15,579 8,030 6,763

7,884 8,218 77,582 97,663 Curacoa,

1,041 210 714

803

683 322 1,094

763 5,630 8,043 4,306 Honduras,..

110 3,408 4,328 1,662 8,754 840

3,852 539

20,781
Maracaibo,
7,059 8,164 5,142 1,542 2,584 5,035 2,283 2,796 2,393 1,737 4,509 4,576 42,870

41,103
Maranham,
8,426

526

4,135

8,087 22,219 28,822 Mexican,.. 8,125 650 511 1,221 6,080 1,914 2,635

2,114 2,941 1,788 1,722 24,684 66,241 33,071 Monte Video,

25,532 11,151 3,013 5,310 5,355

1,225 25,678 82,264 184,996 72,365 14,758 17,035 8,400

4,394 15,055 7,887 86,197 15,500

121,176 282,877 202,426 636 23 8,589

14 245
160

4,667 16,800 20,684
Porto Cabello,

486
2,629
2,618 529 6,318

1,172 8,410 401 7,359 24,352 25,860 45,145
Porte-au-Platte,..

2,894
826 283 983 2,060 428 4,071 1,407

2,192 1,886 416 16,936 18,606 Rio Grande,.. 17,056 11,404 10,192 8,956

21,977

13,206 14,595 16,899 13,827 10,776 188,888 178,641 110,528 Rio Hache,

1,752 433 159 200

2,544 12,808 18,500 Savanilla,..

2,213 8,180 8,513 8,056 6,595 5,635 2,354 3,828 4,171

6,955 4,248 49,248 28,547 Sierra Leone,

800

6,214 2,406

9,420 86,523 Singapore and Penang,

9,425 3,304

890 1,191 90S

18,718 11,783 7,667 West India, &c.,.. 1,148 1,826 1,578 1,702 714 849 130

151 602

630

2,862 1,918 , 12,655 84,117 84,697 Bundry South American,... 8,303 2,280 614 2,023 401 865 590 23

183 492

10,812 10,932 8,388
Central American,..

800
2,306 2,533

4,000
4,833
2,405

16,427 31,183
From Antwerp,...

1,955

1,985 6,552 86,647 Hamburg,

49,080 125,219
Havre,...

24,369 80,183
Liverpool...

525 3,555 2,958 7,068 42,077 11,556
London,...

11,860 10,089 Marseilles,..

19,869 Sundry foreign, 77 1,000 320 1,000 187

850

1,200 829 800 650 6,913 62,810 231,310 Total foreign, 1860, 188,875 87,211 91,443 51,212 58,285 78,322 84,845 43,646 99,667 57,217

63,433

96,416 992,622

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Total foreign, 1859, 184,263 120,570 175,663 200,978 216,448 158,24297,718 154,271 181,086 71,603 220,243 121,881

1,852,866
1858,

57,898 32,554 82,838 66,736 92,172 145,241 119,086 94,006 188,762 272,312 122,694 213,887
DOMESTIO
California,..

81,189 10,483
23,283 10,612 28,860
10,419 22,669 8,914 28,271

169,150 160,542
New-Orleans,..

2,966 10,454 10,823 13,582 12,173 15,019 1,440 5,496 2,909 6,593 6,266 5,018 92,769 69,498
Texns, ...
20,785 11,592 15,826 23,358 89,820 18,495 12,891 16,764

7,184 22,979 23,625 212,769 101,147
Sundry coastwise,

5,469 6,174 25,868 11,188 8,314 16,142 1,509 879 8,625 20,987 37,854 15,855 158,844 122,427
By rail,...
23,328 11,172 15,931 10,151 12,041 2,744 3,005

189 2,219

1,941 7,832 90,103 90,821 Total domestic, 1860,

83,787 49,82568,498 S6,512 82,990 70,760 18,345 33,747 36,422 433,628 97,311 51,860 723,685
1959,
82,091 36,511 80,063 46,906 40,780 86,834 88,322 26,740 37,589 17,458 67,608 34,068

541,935
1853, 88,632 27,982 29,513 91,443 42,210 74,776 18,262 19,132 89,177 42,583 58,025 35,738
Total foreign and domestic, 1860, 272,612 187,086 159,941 137,724 141,275 144,082 108,190 77,893 186,089 100,845 150,744 147,820 1,716,257
1859, 216,854 157,081 255,626247,879 257,178 195,076 136,040 181,011218,675 89,061 287,851 155,941

2,897,791
1858, 96,080 60,530 111,851 158,181 184,412 220,020 137,848 113,188 172,939 815,195 180,719 249,612
CALCUTTA, &c., IN BALES.
Calcutta and East India,... 178 292 250 841 24 15 207 892 159 141

2,094 1,781
From sundry foreign ports, mostly
re-shipments of Calcutta,......

14 19

6 85 25

159

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YEARS.
1648,
1849,
1850,
1851,
1852
1858,
1854,
1855,
1856,
1857,
1858,
1959,
1860,

IMPORTS OF HIDES AT NEW-YORK FOR THE PAST THIRTEEN YEARS.
Jan.
Feb. March. April. Muy.

June. July. Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov.
109,324 54,400 112,782 113.976 94,160 26,957 109,761 97,435 53,962

58,710 40,219
70,929 65,431 112,604 135,448 114,144 70,502 155,260 74,527 46,290 146,584 64,946
118.820 141,900 58,200 118,400 144,500 146,400 113,000 117,965 169.900 83.100 120,700
115,500 103,000 184,100 136,000 114,150 78,000 100.000 108,480 110,900 110,600 118,000

50,000 101,000 76,000 75,500 139,000 98,500 93,800 140,600 103,000 70,000 195,000
50,000 78,000 130,540 110,100 117,460 99,000 111.500 150,000 105.500 71,800 164,200
178,519 121,758 180,247 108,900 198.956 125,650 176,700 142,685 142,500 185,890 125,000
106,200 76,200 108,500 163,800 127,700 145.700 93,600 128,000 160,800 156,700 116,000
212,103 118,259 101,898 203,500 203,864 189,212 91,316 129,817 121,648 143,981 150,977
123.709 223,190 120,908 152,697 210 513 122,929 150,144 114,729 81,742 171,577 164,188

96,030 60,580 111,851 158,181 134,412 220,020 187,848 113,138 172,989 815,195 180,719
216,351 157,034 255,626 247.879 257,178 195,076 186,040 181,0:1 218,675 89,061 287,851
212,612 187,036 159,941 187,724 141,275 144,082 108,190 177,393 186,089 100,845 150,744

Dec. Total,
101,018 972,654
178.025 1,229,727
156,000 1,483,805
142,400 1,366,030
235,000 1,437,200

71,700 1,259,800
98,360 1,679.995
170,800 1,550.000
130,887 1,715,900
160,477 1,796,753
249,612 1,950,014
155 941 2,897,791
147,826 1,716,257

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THE past year may be noted as one not generally satisfactory to the manufacturing interests of this department of business, while most of the jobbers have realized fair profits, although the amount of trade has generally fallen short of their anticipations. At the commencement of the year 1860, the prosperity in the commercial affairs of the country gave indications of an active and profitable business. The panic of the previous year, caused by o of the New-England manufacturers, had so reduced prices of many kinds, that during the last half of the year 1859 many of the large jobbing houses of this city were induced to purchase on a liberal scale, and thus early secure a stock for the ensuing spring trade, while the rates at which these supplies were bought were supposed to be, and undoubtedly were, in many instances, lower than the same article could be manufactured, thus encouraging holders to believe they would be able to defy all competition in prices at the early spring sales, which it was generally expected would be heavy, both to the Western and Southern States; to the latter, on account of the great prosperity which that section had enjoyed for some previous years, through her large and remunerative crops; to the former, on account of the caution manifested by the dealers, and the limited amount of boots and shoes shipped to that portion of the country since the great commercial panic of 1857. With neither of these sections, however, has the business of the past year equalled expectations, notwithstanding the unprecedented harvest and the general prosperity of the West during the first ten months of the year. The month of January passed; Southern merchants scarcely began to make their appearance; and it became a subject of remark that Southern trade was coming in late. Travellers returning from that section of the country soon intimated that a large surplus of boots and shoes was remaining on hand, and that only moderate requirements for the spring business need be expected. To this was added, as a further discouraging feature, the report that many bills contracted the previous autumn would require an extension until a disposition could be made of stock on hand. Nearly the middle of March was reached before there was a moderate representation of the Southern trade in this market. Stocks were full, and prices continued low. For some new styles, however, which were less abundant, an advance was now obtained. The strike which was at this time taking place among the Massachusetts workmen rendered it difficult to obtain, at short notice, a full supply of all descriptions. During the latter part of March and the whole of April, tradesmen from the Western and Southwestern States came forward to a fair extent; but the lessons of 1857 did not seem to be lost upon them, for their purchases were characterized by much caution, and a decided preference for ood substantial work, rejecting, at almost any price, the lowest class of astern manufacture, of which the market had been heavily stocked the preceding year. It soon became evident that sales to the West, although trade appeared healthy, and the amount all that could reasonably have been expected, were not approaching the ideas of our sanguine dealers, and that they would not equal the purchases of the spring of 1859.

Trade with our own State, and some of those immediately adjoining, was steady and not below the average of previous years during the first half of 1860, while the aggregate sales to other sections of the country are variously estimated at 20 (a) 25 per cent. less than during the same months in 1859. The wholesale houses and others engaged in manufacturing in this city, profiting by the experience of the previous years, cut up stock much more cautiously, studying more carefully the requirements of their customers, and awaiting, in many instances, actual orders before preparing their goods for market. This caution in management has enabled many of the manufacturers to realize, if not extravagant, at least fair profits during the larger portion of the year.

The month of July brought but few orders from any section of the country, and a considerable part of August passed before the Southern purchasers were fairly in the market. As in the spring, so in the autumn, trade from the Southern States came forward late, and to a much less extent than had been generally anticipated, while extensions upon bills previously purchased were not unfrequent, giving considerable anxiety to some of our dealers, even previously to the presidential election in November. Early in September the West was well represented in this market, and purchases, although made with much confidence and freedom, were devoid of that recklessness which characterized the operations of the early part of 1857. Notwithstanding the quantities required for this section were much less than had been estimated by many, a business fully equalling the average of the last five years has been realized. Western merchants extended the time of making their purchases over a somewhat longer period than usual, while from the more Southern country there was a gradual diminution of orders after the first of September, and almost an entire cessation before the first of November, since which date the political affairs of the country have not been such as to contribute to any improvement.

The year closes with a pressure upon many of our houses, brought about by the agitations of the country, which it is very difficult to withstand. Manufacturers have nearly ceased operations. A more than average stock of boots and shoes for the season remains in the hands of the trade, which, for cash, could generally be purchased at less than the cost of production.

Exports of Boots and Shoes from the several ports of the U. S., during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1860.

Ports. Amount. Ports. Amount.
New-York,................. $ 241,291 | New-Orleans, .............. $4,128
Boston, . . . . ............... 197,150 | Vermont,...... . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,697
San Francisco,...... . . . . . . . . 101,555 || Philadelphia,........... - - - - 2,494
Niagara, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116,281 | Salem, ......... - - - - - - - - - - - 2,475
Passamaquoddy,............ 58,570
Baltimore, ...... - - - - - - - - - - - - 27,147 || Total, 13 ports,........ ... '774,273
Oswegatchie,....... - - - - - - - - 11,148 || Total, all other, ....... . . - 8,252

4,539
4,798 || Total, United States,...... $782,525

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IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF Boots AND SHOES AT THE PORT OF NEW-YORK

FOR THE YEAR 1860, WITH THE Custom House VALUATION.

IMPORTS OF BOOTS AND SHOES. 223 packages, valued at $35,229.

EXPORTS OF BOOTS AND SHOES.

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Destination.

Quantity. Value. Destination. Quantity. Vulue, Cuba,... 347 cases, $62,760 | Peru,.

114 cases, $ 8,651 Gibraltar,

7
500 Hayti,

40

3,594 British Australia,. . .1,892 59,248 British West Indies,. 670 33,186 W. A. Colonies, 268 10,020 | French

10

237 “ Honduras,

112
5,868 Danish

10,907 Mexico,....

29
1,344 Dutch

19

1,003 Central America,. 58

2,270 Porto Rico,..

91

5,197 Venezuela,

64
3,740 Liverpool,

361

7,470 New-Grenada... 558 31,795 Havre,

33

2,058 Brazil,....

75
7,795 Hamburg,.

164

7,070 British Guiana,

11
521 | China,

117

5,195 Argentine Republic,. 671 26,657 Africa,

34

1,609 Cisalpine Republic,... 204 4,000 Chili,...

230

13,642 Total,........6,231 $137,301

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66

NEW YORK HIDE MARKET FOR 1860.

From the Shoe and Leather Reporter.

The dry-hide trade of the past year has called forth, from those engaged in the importation, not only much energy, perseverance and patience, but a heavy outlay of money, and has been prosperous only by determined effort on the part of importers, excited by the great pecuniary interest which has been centering in this business for the last few years. The high prices to which hides were carried by the expansion and speculation of 1857, attracted the notice of hide-producing countries, and every available means was brought into requisition to increase the already numerous domesticated herds which roam over the pampas of South America; while the rifle and the lasso penetrated still further into the mountains. This stimulus has since gradually but largely in. creased the product in many sections both of the Eastern and Western continents. Notwithstanding the growing requirements for leather in this and other countries, the increase in the production of the raw material has more than kept pace with the demand, leaving a large surplus in the hands of the various branches of trade between the grower of hides and the consumer of leather. This surplus, in a country where capital is all fully employed, and money worth from seven to twelve per cent. per annum, must necessarily induce an unhealthy condition in some departments of the business, which, from the force of circumstances and the heavy amounts of capital employed in the importation of dry hides, has unfortunately, during the past year, borne heavily upon that class who are least able to support the loss—the manufacturers of leather. Wet salted hides for the first ten months enjoyed, proportionately, a greater degree of prosperity. The heavy requirements of some of the European

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