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COMMERCE OF BUFFALO, The following comparative table shows the receipts of lake tlour and grain at Buffalo for the month of September in each of the following years :

1859.
1860.

1861, Flour..... ...bbls. 236,399

19 4,092

828,611

Wheat, Corn, Oats.. Barley, Rye,....

.bush. 1,600,836 ..bush. 290,148

.bush. 148,961 ...bush. 18,905

..bush. 27.710

4,808,939
1,816,842
133,209
69,098
2,888

8,988,019
4,741,141
886,801

8,678
29,003

Totals grain one month, 2,086,678

6,320,123

9,099,890 And from the opening of navigation to September 30th, in the years

1859.
1860.

1861. Flour,..... .bbls, 876,934

729,322

1,888,414

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THE CORK TRADE, The cork trade in Portugal is reported to be on the increase. Tho annual exportation now amounts to upwards of 10,000,000f. It takes place principally from Sines, the only port of the province of Alemtojo, where the largest quantity of cork trees grow. The greatest amount is sent to London, where, on the average, the consumption amounts to 10,000 lbs. per day of Portuguese corks. A considerable quantity is also sent to France, America and the Baltic. The Portuguese cork is inferior to the French, but superior to that of Italy,

THE TRADE OF TURKEY, The following statistics relative to the trade of the Turkish empire are not without interest: The general trade of Turkey with foreign countries amounts to about £41,000,000 sterling. Its traffic with Great Britain and France amounts to about 40 per cent, of its entire foreign trade, That with Austria, 15 per cent. ; with other parts of Germany, 10; with Russia, 5; Belgium, 2 ; and all other countries, 28 per cent, In 1857 the trade between Turkey and France announted, for exports, to 84,901,74-1., and for imports to 110,422,893f. In the year 1858 the imports amounted to only 84,901,7488., and the exports to 69,923,746f. France has chiefly imported from Turkey corn, raw silk, cocoons, silk-wonins' cugs, wool, cotton and seeds for crushing. The exports from France to Turkey consist of stuffs, refined sugar, dressed skins, with a variety of manufactured goods. Turkey supplied France, within the 19 years between 1841 and 1859, with 300,000,000f, worth of com, equal to about 21 per cent. of the entire of the exports from that country during the same period,

EXPORTS FROM PENANG TO THE UNITED STATES,

FOR THE YEARS 1859 AND 1860. Articles, 1860. 1859 Articles.

1860. 1859. Camphor, cases,

261 Sugar,.. .piculs, 9,051 3,447 Cinnamon, ..piculs, 41 22 Tapioca,.

3,268 1,480 Cutch,.. 6,791 4,066 | Tin,...

22,138 17,370 Gum Benjamin, 22 47 Tortoise Shell,

1 Gutta Percha,

103
Essential Oil, .cases,

22 Hides, 2,648 3,909 Cassia,..

109 Horns,..

11 Tea,..

.bxs.,

67 India Rubber, 3,178 1,621 China,

.piculs,

55 Mace, 287 244 Wild Cinnamon,

471 Nutmegs, 2,390 7,556 Fire Crackers, .bxs.,

68 Black Pepper, 20,627 38,510 Gum Damar,. .piculs,

5 White Pepper,

18 Pepper,

.bags,

25 Ratan, . 3,243 · 2,580 Mace Paste,. ..case,

1 ...galls., 60 Ratan Chairs, .No.,

8

Rum,

TRADE AND NAVIGATION OF FRANCE. The French Board of Trade returns for the first quarter of this year give the duties on imports at 25,931,000f., against 38,346,000f. in the corresponding period in 1860, and 41,991,000f. in 1859, showing a considerable falling off, arising from alterations in the tariff, in accordance with the Anglo-French commercial treaty. At the same time, however, there is a considerable increase in the quantities of imported produce and manufactures, such as wines, spirits, cocoa, coffee, grain and flour, cochineal, cotton, oil-seeds, tallow and lard, coal, coke, wool and machinery.

The latter has increased in value from 870,290f. last year, to 1,643,980f. this year; pig iron from England from 62,364 quintals last year, has increased to 164,255 quintals; copper from England from 13,601 quintals last year has increased to 24,518 quintals ; lead, zinc, salt, from 87 quintals last year from England, has increased to 5,739 quintals. Sugars, both foreign and colonial, and flax and hemp fabrics.

The exports from France show a falling off this year, as compared with last year, in oxen and sheep, inferior wines, grain, flour, machinery, millinery, porcelain, salt, refined sugar, glass; but there is an increase in woollen fabrics and oil-cake. The returns relating to shipping give the following results :

FRENCH VESSELS. 1st quarter.

Inwards.

Outwards. 370,184

318,718 324,941

316,675 1859,

343,659

344,416
FOREIGN VESSELS.
1861,

511,666

289,559 1860,.

511,406

345,984 1859,

363,677 Although foreign trade in France continues to be in a depressed state, the increased receipts of the railway companies indicate an improvement in the home trade. Accounts from St. Dizier mention a brisk demand for cast iron, of which 1,200,000 kilogrammes were disposed of within a

484,304

1861, 1860,....

few days.

The price, which a short time since was only 121f., rose to 125f. This rise in the present dull season astonishes some parties. The depression in the foreign trade is attributed in a great measure to the civil war in the United States. This assertion is confirmed by the official returns, which show that the exportation of wine to the States has declined during the present year to 63,759 hectolitres from 131,000 hectolitres in the corresponding period of the year 1859; brandy, to 13,428 hectolitres from 50,297 ; millinery, the value reduced to 112,521f. from 547,862f. The export of silks from France, which in the corresponding period of the year 1859 amounted to 20,719 metrical quintals of 2241 pounds weight, has, during the present year, declined to 15,903. The metrical quintal of silk is worth 10,000f., which makes a diminution of nearly 150,000,000f. in that article alone.

THE LINEN TRADE.
EXPORTS OF LINENS FROM THE UNITED KINGDOM FOR THE Sıx Moytus ENDING JULY 30.
To

1859.
1860.

1861. Hanse Towns,. .yards, 3,583,366 5,154,565

5,560,246 United States,

.31,170,751 23,815,079 12,059,993 Cuba,

5,188,146
4,022,631

4,431,291 St. Thomas,

933,044
707,005

1,709,607 Brazil,.

4,909,415 4,544,674 4,688,841 British West Indies,.

1,770,583

2,469,916 2,336,941 British East Indies,

1,392,850
1,336,577

1,453,381 Australia, . 1,920,652 2,612,291

2,134,231 Other countries,

.14,738,163 17,102,190 26,478,059

Total yards,...

..65,606,970

60,764,918

60,852,590

CHINA TRADE. From New-Chwang, the newly-opened port in Manchuria, accounts have been received, describing it as situated in a low, flat, swampy country. The town stands on a creek eight miles from the main river, and eighty from its mouth. It is approached by a very tortuous river, which is full of sand banks. About fifteen miles below New-Chwang, the river forms into two branches, one of which, called Wy-leaou-ho, runs on about 330 miles to Le-mun-tun, a place of great trade. The other branch, called the Le-leaou-ho, goes on to Mard-ka. At Tai-tsze, the Tien-tsin and Shangtung junks load, while those from Ningpo and Shanghai load at Yenko. There is a large junk trade at both these places, which export peas, beans, tobacco, pea-cake, oil and drugs. Yenko is a filthy place of mud huts, built in a swamp, the streets so full of uncleanliness that it is difficult to walk about, and nothing is to be seen but poverty and dirt; the country all around is flat, with not a blade of grass to relieve the eye. Cattle, and a few fruits, are procurable with difficulty. Altogether, the prospects of this port are not encouraging.

THE TOBACCO TRADE. The last annual report on foreign commerce from the State Department gives very full and explicit information upon the subject of the

growth, manufacture and consumption of tobacco in foreign countries, where we have also a market for our own tobacco. The low prices of the wine crop for some years, and also the failures of that crop, induced many large owners of vineyards in Germany to convert, at a great expense, their vineyards into tobacco fields, tobacco then bearing a good price. But the last three years have proved good wine years, and the prices of tobacco have been considerably reduced. So the tobacco fields are being turned back into vineyards.

German tobacco has been bought by American speculators and exported to the United States, where it is manufactured into segars and reexported to Europe as American tobacco. The American traders found after awhile that they were not buying even German tobacco, but beet and turnip leaves, with which it is extensively adulterated. German segars, made partly of beet and turnip leaves, are also exported into the United States and to other countries. Belgium and Holland and the Zollverein are the chief consumers of the beet and turnip-leaf tobacco, and the article stands in the way of the consumption of the pure American tobacco. The quantity of German tobacco now on hand, including the beet and turnip-leaf crops, is represented as immense. It is held back for higher prices. One single house has five hundred quintals of leaves on hand, waiting for a rise in the leaf market.

The American tobacco which is manufactured into snuff is mixed with five per cent. of German tobacco, in consequence of which, all snuff manufactured at Bingen, &c., is subject to a transit duty when exported to Northern Germany. Thus the American tobacco, which has already paid duty, pays duty a second time.

In this report there are fifty consular despatches respecting the tobacco trade of the United States in various parts of the world. The tariffs upon tobacco, and the monopoly regulations concerning it, and laws affecting its price to the consumer, are given in this report with much detail. -National Intelligencer.

PHILADELPHIA GRAIN MARKET.

Sept. 28, 1858. Sept. 28, 1859. Sept. 28, 1860. Flour, (extra). ...per bbl. $ 5 50

$5 50

$6 88 Flour, (superfine,)

5 37
4 87

5 62 Rye flour,...

4 00
4 00

4 25 Corn meal,

4 00
3 50

3 50 Corn, (yellow,)...per bush. 93

75 Corn, (white,). 83

73 Oats,

44
40

36 Rye,

83
85

80
Wheat, (red)
1 30

1 33 Wheat, (white,)... 1 40

1 45

Sept. 28, 1861.

$5 50

5 25 3 25 2 81

56 541 31

60 1 24 1 35

PRICE OF POTATOES FROM 1854 TO 1861. The following table, carefully prepared for the American Agriculturist, by Mr. HENRY B. Walker, a large dealer in New-York, will be found interesting and useful. The statistics have reference to the best potatoes at wholesale prices; it will be noticed that the price has fallen every year, with but one exception, since 1854:

January,
February,
March,
April,
May,
June,
July,
August,.....
September,
October,...
November,
December,

AVERAGE PRICE OF POTATOES PER BUSHEL. 1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. 1858. $ 1 07 $1 22 $0 72 $0 97 $0 91 1 18 1 25

72 1 03 1 00 1 12 1 25

80 1 00

88 1 50 1 43

63 1 35

77 1 44 1 26

60 1 41

58 1 50 1 34

60 1 25

55 1 00 1 00 1 00

62

61
1 50

63
69
64

61
1 22

69
70
83

87
1 00

69
70
83

64
1 89

66
84
96

53
1 02

65
94
95

55

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Average,. . $1 22

$1 01

$ 1 00 .. $0 72

$0 56

BANGOR LUMBER MARKET. Amount of lumber surveyed from January 1st to September 1st, 1861, compared with the amount surveyed during the same period in 1859 and 1860 :

1859.
1860.

1861. Green pine, .feet, 36,500,687

32,421,759

20,058,281 Dry pine, 6,957,048 6,910,216

5,269,408 Spruce, 50,778,315 60,671,908

43,770,971 Hemlock, &c.,. 11,148,414

12,264,641

7,506,969

Total,..

105,384,464

112,568,523

76,605,569

LA K E RECEIPTS OF BREAD STUFFS. The total receipts of flour, wheat and corn, (flour reduced to wheat,) at the four leading ports, for the week ending September 21st, and since 1st January last, were as follows:

Week ending Sept. 21.

Since Jan. 1.
Chicago,
bushels, 1,702,907

37,679,895
Toledo,

918,783

10,881,914 Milwaukie,..

659,640

9,790,671 Detroit,

250,992

4,886,758

BREADSTUFFS IN FRANCE. The last important movement is thus announced under official caption in the Moniteur : " From the 15th of the present month (October) till the 30th of September, 1862, the cargoes of grain and flour, rice, potatoes or dry vegetables, carried on rivers and canals, not conceded to public companies, will be exempted from all internal navigation dues levied by the State. The same exemption will be extended to the dues levied on canals that have been so conceded, and which may be re-purchased, under the authority of the laws of the 28th of July and the 1st of August, 1860. Foreign vessels may, till the same date, and under the same conditions as French vessels, navigate all the rivers and canals of France exempt from these dues, wherever their cargoes may have been grown, provided they consist of grain and cereals, as specified in the former article.” VOL. XLV.-NO. V.

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