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JOERNAL OF NAUTICAL INTELLIGENCE

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I. Larxes or A CrXARD STRAWIE. II. Tux CYNARD STRAN M III. VENTILATION

Sairs. IV. Vox LIGHT-Horsks-1. NarxSUNK LOHT* Orip or INLAND - No TERRANEAN- TURKEY- SEA or MALNURA ENGLAND Guur op Horanta, V. DEYLATION OF THE COUPass

LAUNCH OF A CUNARD STEAMER. On the 8th October, Messrs. Napier & Sons launched from their building yard, at Govan, the finest scrow steamer which the Clydo han yet produced. The vessel which, as a scrow, has carried off the palm, in named the China, and is intended as a complement to those ting vessels which are already on the Cunard line. Tho launch was most succes fully completed, notwithstanding the disagrocablo character of the wea ther. The youthful daughter of Mr. CAMPDELL, of Blythswood, performed the interesting ceremony of naming tho vonnol, Tho China in a ship of 2,600 tons burthen. She is to be fitted with oncillating onginen of 550 nominal horse-power, and patent surface-condensors in addition to the ordinary condensers. The Cunard Company have always exhib ited the greatest caution, combined with the highont enterprino, in constructing the vessels intended for their line; and in the present case we have an instance of a vessel, fitted up with all the mont recent improvements, and yet, to provide for the smallest chance of an accident, having on board not only the condensers on the new system, which has gone. rally been adopted to the discardment of the old plan, but those also founded on the former system. This is only an additional proof to the many which have already been given of the great care and attention which the Cunard Company have always paid to the building of their famous line of steamers. The following are the dimensions of the China: Length of keel and forerake, 322 feet; breadth, (moulded,) 40 feet; depth, (moulded,) 29 feet; and extreme length, 346 feet. ----Clasgow Herald, Oct., 1861.

THE CUNARD STEAM FLEET, The Sidon, a fine screw steamer, of about 1,800 tons, (builders' meas. urement,) and 300 borse-power, arrived recently in the Mersey, from the Clyde, after a rapid passage. The SIDON was built by Messrs. Wile LIAM DENNY & Brothers, of Dumbarton, and her engines, which are of the oscillating kind, were constructed by Messrs. TULLOCH & DENNY, of the same town. She belongs to the Mediterranean text of the CUNARD Company, and will sail for the Italian ports in a few days.

VENTILATION OF SHIPS. Messrs. SILVER & MORE have patented a new method for ventilating the between decks of ships. Having made sundry experiments, they

discovered that all gases descend. To carry them upwards, therefore, a downward and upward draught was necessary. This they have managed by opening trap-valves in all the decks below the spar deck. These apertures are protected by the insertion of a round iron grating. The valves under the decks spread the air or gases, and help in the downdraught, and they are made self-acting, so as to close in the event of water filling the compartments of the hold, and thus stop its passage above the lower deck. To carry off the gases and all foul air from the hold, pipes are let down through all the decks to within a few feet below the lower deck. The upper parts of these pipes are conically shaped, to create a current of air. The gases are carried up, naturally, by this up-draught, and pass away above the bulwarks. By this simple contrivance the patentees maintain that they can keep the between decks free from impure air and foul smells, for, as the pure

air
passes

down the hatchways it carries with it the gases to the hold, and thence by the up-pipes to the spar-deck. The smell from bilge-water and offensive cargo would be considerably lessened by this mode of ventilation. The principle, we understand, is about to be adopted in France, in theatres and hospitals, and is to be tried in ships.-Mitchell's Steam Shipping Journal.

NEW LIGHT-HOUSES.

Navesink Lights, marking the approaches to the harbor of New-York.The Light-House Board at Washington gives notice that two new lighthouse towers are being erected at Navesink, N. J., a few feet in the rear of the two light-house towers from which the existing lights are now exhibited. On or about the 1st day of May, 1862, of which due notice will be given in advance, two first order fixed lights will be exhibited from the new towers, and the old towers will be removed. The illuminating apparatus will be catadioptric of the first order, according to the system of FRESNEL. The towers are built of reddish gray granite; are each 53 feet 6 inches in height from the base to the lantern deck, having a focal plane above the mean level of the sea of 258 feet. Both lights will have exactly the same elevation. The new towers stand 228 feet apart from centre to centre of the lanterns, and preserve the bearings of the old ones from each other.

The intelligent seaman will not fail to perceive that, in approaching the entrance to the bay of New-York from the southward, after passing the Capes of the Delaware, he may see (if within their range) the first order fixed light at Absecom, or the first order revolving or flashing light, (visible once in every ten seconds,) at Barnegat, on the New-Jersey coast, and then the two first order fixed lights at Navesink; or, if approaching from the eastward, after passing Montauk first order light, (fixed, varied by flashes once in every two minutes,) he may see the first order fixed light at Great West (Shinnecock) Bay, or the first order revolving light (once every minute) at Fire Island, from which last light he can shape his course to make the two fixed lights at Navesink.

The Navesink lights are 38} nautical miles to the northward of the Barnegat Light, and 38 nautical miles to the westward of Fire Island Light. The Barnegat and Navesink lights will be seen at the same time in clear weather in sixteen fathoms water, and at thirteen nautical miles distance

from the New-Jersey beach. The Fire Island and Navesink lights will be seen at the same time in clear weather in sixteen fathoms water, and at seventeen nautical miles distance from the Long Island beach. The existing lights at Navesink have a mean range of revolving light, twentytwo nautical miles; fixed lights, twenty nautical miles. The two first order fixed lights to be exhibited from the new towers, on or about the 1st of May, 1862, will have a range (under ordinary states of the atmosphere, from the deck of a vessel fifteen feet above the water) of 251 nautical miles, and both will be made at the same time, and both will be seen at the same time when within their range. A new notice will be issued during the ensuing winter, setting forth the precise night on which the old lights will be discontinued and the new fixed lights exhibited.

Island of Haughland, Gulf of Finland. - Change of Light.- The Hydrographical Department of the Minister of Marine of Russia has given notice that the upper light upon the Island of Haughland—that is, the upper one upon the northern hill of that island-in latitude 60° 05' 44" north, longitude 26° 58' 24" east of Greenwich, will be lighted, after the repairs shall have been completed, with a FRESNEL apparatus of the first order, showing a white light. This light is situated 3834 feet above mean sea level, and should be seen in clear weather at a distance of 25 to 28 nautical miles.

Mediterranean Sea.Bosphorus.—The Turkish government has given notice, that on the 16th day of August, 1861, the following lights were exhibited from light-houses recently erected in the Bosphorus :

Fixed Green Lights.Pilon de Sultan-Serail.Two fixed green lights, placed vertically, have been established between the villages of Defterdar and Kourou Tcheshmeh, on the coast of Europe, in front of the Sultan's Palace. The lights are about sixty yards from the quay, at an elevation of thirty-nine feet above the sea, and visible at four miles.

Fixed Red Lights on Kandili Point.Also, two fixed red lights, placed vertically, on Kandili Point, on the coast of Asia. The lights are exhibited above the first row of houses bordering the quay, at an elevation of 112 feet above the sea, and visible at a distance of four miles.

Fixed Green Lights at Roumili Hissar.-Also, two fixed green lights, placed vertically, on the point of Roumili Hissar, on the coast of Europe. The lights are exhibited under the wall of the fortress, at the distance of 110 yards from the guard-house, at the height of forty-six feet above the sea, and visible at a distance of four miles.

Fired Red Lights at Khanlijeh Point.---Also, two fixed red lights, placed vertically, on Khanlijeh Point, on the coast of Asia. The lights are exhibited 110 yards from the shore, above the first row of houses which border the quay, at an elevation of ninety-two feet above the sea, and visible at four miles.

Fixed Green Lights at Yeni-Keui.—Also, three fixed green lights, in the form of a triangle, shown from a light-vessel moored on the edge of the bank off the village of Yeni-Keui, on the coast of Europe. The lights are elevated forty-six feet above the sea, and visible at four miles.

Fixed Green Lights at Therapia.-Also, two fixed green lights, placed vertically, close to the battery of Kefali Keui, at about one mile N. W.

by W. of Therapia, on the coast of Europe. The lights are forty-six feet above the sea, and visible at four miles.

Fixed Red Lights on Umur Banks.—Also, three fixed red lights, in the form of a triangle, exhibited from a light-vessel, moored on the western edge of the Umur Banks, on the coast of Asia. The lights are elevated forty-six feet above the sea, and visible at four miles.

Fixed Red Lights at Jeron Point.-Also, two fixed red lights, placed vertically, are exhibited from Jeron Point, the outermost point of the low fort of Kavak, on the coast of Asia, at the height of forty-six feet above the sea, and visible at a distance of four miles.

Mediterranean Sea. The Turkish government has given notice, that on the 16th day of August, 1861, the following lights were exbibited from light-houses recently erected in the Archipelago and Dardanelles :

Archipelago.- Revolving Light on Sigri Island, Mityleni. A revolving white light, eclipsed every thirty seconds, has been established on Sigri island, at the west end of the island of Mityleni, at a height of 180 feet above the mean level of the sea, and should be seen in clear weather at a distance of 24 miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the first order. The position of the light-house is given in lat. 31° 13' N., long. 25° 51' 15" east of Greenwich.

Fixed Light on Ponente Point, Tenedos.Also, a fixed white light has been established on Ponente Point, the low western point of the island of Tenedos, at a height of 59 feet above the mean level of the sea, and should be seen in clear weather at the distance of fourteen miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the third order. The light-house is in lat. 39° 50' north, long 25° 58' 45" east of Greenwich.

Fixed and Flashing Light on Isle Gadaro.—Also, a fixed and flashing light, a red flash recnrring every two minutes, is shown from a light-house on Isle Gadaro, one mile eastward of the northeast end of Tenedos. The light is 59 feet above the mean level of the sea, and visible at a distance of twelve miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the fourth order. The position of the light-house is in lat. 39° 50' north, long. 26° 6' 15" east of Greenwich.

Dardanelles.Green Lights at Seddul-Bahr.-Also, two green lights, placed vertically, are exhibited from the south point of the fortress at Seddul-Bahr, about one mile eastward of Cape Helles, on the coast of Europe. The lights are 52 feet above the mean level of the sea, and visible at a distance of four miles. The position of the light-house is 40° 2' 18" north, long. 26° 12' 5" east of Greenwich.

Revolving Light of Khephez or Barber's Point.Also, a revolving red light, eclipsed every thirty seconds, is shown from a light-house near the battery in ruins, one mile southwest from Khephez or Barber's Point, on the coast of Asia. The light is 59 feet above the mean level of the sea, and should be seen at a distance of twelve miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the fourth order. The light-house is in lat. 40° 6' 21" north, long. 26° 22' 15'' east of Greenwich.

Fixed Red Lights on Cape Peskieri.—Also, two fixed red lights, placed vertically, are exhibited from a light-house at Cape Peskieri, N. N. W. of the village of Bourgas, on the

coast of Asia, at an elevation of

of 56 feet above the mean level of the sea, and should be seen at a distance of four miles. The position of the light-house is in lat. 40° 16' 40"north, long. 26° 34' 15" east of Greenwich.

Mediterranean Sea.-Sea of Marmora.—The Turkish government has given notice, that on the 16th day of August, 1861, the following lights were exhibited from light-houses recently erected in the Sea of Marmora :

Fired and Flashing Light on Cape Khoraz.—A fixed and flashing white light, a flash recurring every thirty seconds, has been established on the summit of Cape Khoraz, about 1} miles from the village of Khoraz, on the coast of Europe. The light is 180 feet above the mean level of the sea, and should be seen in clear weather at a distance of 22 miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the second order. The position of the light-house is in lat. 40° 41' 15" north, long. 27° 17' 15" east of Greenwich.

Fixed Light at Erekli.Also, a fixed white light on the west point of the coast south of the roadstead of Erekli, on the coast of Europe. The light is 164 feet above the mean level of the sea, and should be seen in clear weather at a distance of eleven miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the fifth order. The position of the light-house is in lat. 40° 58' 28" north, long. 27° 58' 15'' east of Greenwich.

Fixed Light at Kutali.Also, a fixed white light on the rock at the western entrance between Kutali and Rabby (Araplar) islands, at an elevation of 49 feet above the sea, and visible at a distance of ten miles. The illuminating apparatus is dioptric, or by lenses, of the fifth order. The position of the light-house is given in lat. 40° 30' 34" north, long. 27° 28' 5'' east of Greenwich.

Fixed Red Lights on Palio Point.--Also, two fixed red lights, placed vertically, on the western point of Artaki peninsula, at the northern entrance of the channel of Rhoda, at an elevation of 138 feet above the sea, and visible at five miles. The position of the light-house is given in lat. 40° 29' 23" north, long. 27° 40' 40" east of Greenwich.

Yarmouth Sands.- Corton Gatway.—Official information has been received from the Trinity House, London, that a safe channel, exceeding six-tenths of a mile in breadth, has formed between the Corton and Holm sands, known as the Corton Gatway, and will, on or about the 1st November next, be buoyed off as a day channel, with circular black and white striped buoys, on the N. E. side, and with vertically red and white striped buoys on the S. W. side, of which further particulars will be given when the buoys are placed. Notice is also given, that on the 1st of January, 1862, a light-vessel, showing a quick revolving red light, will be placed in fifteen fathoms, just outside the present South Corton Buoy, as a fairway light to the said channel.

Stanford Channel.-Notice having been previously given that this channel can no longer be safely navigated by night, the Stanford lightvessel will be taken away on the 1st January, 1862.

Entrances to the Thames.-Shingles Channel.-Notice is also given, that a deep channel has formed between the Girdler and Shingles sands, and will, on or about the 1st November, be buoyed off with red buoys on the N. E. side, and vertically black and white striped buoys on the S. W. side, of which further particulars will be given when the buoys

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