Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

ENTERED.

The foreign importations at the port of New-York, for the month of October, were about one-half the amount for the same time last year. The figures present singular features compared with October, 1857, when the amount entered for consumption was less, viz., $2,791,905, while for warehousing (under the vast pressure upon the money market) the amount was $7,356,424 ; free goods, $1,782,345; specie, $2,509,194. FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW-YORK IN OCTOBER, 1858–1861. 1858 1859. 1860.

1861. For consumption,.. $ 9,234,470.. $9,346,609 .. $10,974,428 . $3,638,680 For warehousing,

2,157,678. 2,194,258. 2,817,461 2,082,381 Free goods,..... 2,061,468. 1,447,433 .. 1,911,515 . 2,163,452 Specie and bullion, 89,368 . 630,646 .. 1,083,838 .. 639,328

Total entered,... $13,542,984 .. $13,617,946 .. $ 16,787,242 . $ 8,523,741 Withdrawn,... 2,462,425 .. 2,740,892 .. 3,018,393 .. 2,518,080

The Custom-House returns show a total import of merchandise at this port, since January 1st, of one hundred and eight millions, against about two hundred millions for the corresponding ten months of last year. Of the imports during the last ten months only thirty-nine millions were in dry goods, leaving about sixty-nine millions of general merchandise. The specie item, it will be seen, is very important. The specie imports are more than double for the same period in the last four years : FOREIGN IMPORTS AT NEW-YORK FOR TEN MONTHS, FROM JANUARY 1st.

1858.
1859.
1860.

1861. For consumption, . $ 85,816,904 .. $ 153,743,279 .. $140,760,836 . $45,296,493 For warehousing, . 22,389,828 30,646,026. 35,213,386 36,576,280 Free goods,

18,613,563 24,608,111, 23,380,578 25,815,026 Specie and bullion, 2,110,541 2,464,700. 2,231,471 .. 35,826,058

ENTERED.

Total entered, $ 128,930,836 .. $211,362,116 .. $ 201,686,271 .. $ 143,5,12,857 Withdrawn, 33,560,002 . 23,046,201 .. 28,260,420.. 34,067,746

The foreign exports from New-York, exclusive of specie, for the month of October, exceeded thirteen million dollars, and were, therefore, more than fifty per cent. beyond the total imports for the same period. The grain and tobacco markets remain very active, and we may safely anticipate continued large receipts and exports to foreign countries for the remainder of the season. EXPORTS FROM NEW-YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER.

1858.
1859.
1860.

1861. Domestic produce, $5,233,363 . $4.752,779 .. $ 10,067,330 $ 12,904,360 For, mdse., (free,).. 161,063 252,878

94,175

60,868 For, mdse., (dut..).. 359,185

482,440 , 394,753

192,196 Specie and bullion, 3,028,405 . 5,344,169, 2,106,395 .

15,038

Total exports,.. $8,782,016 .. $ 10,832,256 .. $12,662,653 .. $13,172,462 Total, ex. specie, 5,753,611.. 5,488,097.. 10,556,258. 13,157,414

The total exports of produce from the port since January 1st have been more than in any previous year. The specie export hasdeclined to a nominal sum. We annex the general results for the ten months, compared with three previous years. For the current year, thus far, the exports of domestic produce are more than double that of the same period in 1858 and 1859, the large excess of late being paid in specie,

41

VOL. XLV.-NO. VI.

EXPORTS FROM New-YORK TO FOREIGN PORTS FOR TEN MONTHS, FROM JANTABI 1.

1858.
1859.
1860

1861. Domestic produce, $46,767,981 .. $ 48,223,748 .. $ 73,594,650 $ 103,464,788 For, mdse., (free,).. 1,286,624.. 2,580,757 . 2,077,302 . 2,037,500 For. mdse., (dut.,).. 3,345,857. 3,930,108.. 4,531,478 4,332,275 Specie and bullion, 23,631,253 .. 63,270,614 .. 41,463,679 .. 3,294,852

Total exports,.. $ 75,031,715 .. $118,005,227 .. $121,667,109 .. $ 113,129,415 Total, ex. specie, 51,400,462 .. 64,734,613 .. 80,203,430 .. 109,934,563 Cash DUTIES RECEIVED AT NEW-YORK, JANUARY TO OCTOBER. 1858. 1859. 1860.

1861. First six months,.. $ 11,089,112 .. $ 19,512,181 $18,389,679 .. $10,585,335 In July,

3,387,305 4,851,246 . 4,504,066 2,069,591 In August,

3,545,119 4,243,010. 4,496,243. 1,558,824 In September, 2,672,936.. 2,908,509. 3,038,803 .. 1,642,382 In October,

2,054,834 2,318,754 .. 2,632,078. 1,672,617

Total, 9 months, $ 22,749,306 .. $33,833,700 .. $ 33,060,869.. $ 17,528,749

Messrs. TELLKAMPF & Kitching, in their last wool circular, say: During the month of November the demand for wool was not as active as it was in the previous one. Low and medium domestic fleece have met with ready sale, however, at full rates, but of these qualities there is little to be had. Pulled wools have been sold up generally. An auction sale of 600,000 lbs. of fleece and pulled wool took place in Boston on the 19th ultimo, and while the prices of low and medium qualities were fully sustained, the fine wools, of which there was a large proportion, hardly brought the ruling prices at private sale.

The imports of dry goods in October were extremely limited, woollens being mainly the supply entered for consumption: IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS at New-YORK FOR THE MONTH OF OCTOBER.

Entered for Consumption.
MANUFACTUEES OF 1858.

1859.
1860.

1861. Wool,

$1,008,686 .. $1,421,850... $ 1,452,145 .. $1,032,389 Cotton, 529,125 774,620 .. 482,349

125,168 Silk,

1,364,921 1,165,513 . 1,789,238. 315,563 Flax,.. 415,830. 625,838. 415,214

207,344 Miscellaneous, 226,528. 241,175 .. 474,404.

41,209 Total, ....... $3,545,090., $4,218,996 .. $4,613,330 .. $1,721,673

A large amount of goods were warehoused in July, August and September. These are gradually being withdrawn. The withdrawals, it will be seen, are treble those of October last year:

Withdrawn from Warehouse in October.
MANUFACTURES OF

1858.
1859.
1860.

1861. Wool,

$300,980. $147,508 . $ 196,448. $515,040 Cotton,

64,094 .
57,924.
51,308

130,439 Silk,

54,498
28,843 .
38,677

200,169 Flax,

72,534.

38,240 . 43,081 .. 89,037 Miscellaneous,

75,730.. 29,516 .. 19,599. 21,514 Total, ...... $567,836 $302,031 $ 349,133 $956,199 For consumption,.. 3,545,090. 4,218,996. 4,613,350. 1,721,673

Total on market, $4,112,926 ..

$4,621,027 .. $4,962,483 .. $2,677,872

The reduced supplies of goods on the market forbid the entry of any fresh quantities for warehousing. The following are the results for the month of October :

Entered for Warehousing, October, 1858—1861.
MANUFACTURES OF

1858.
1859.
1860.

1861. Wool,

$ 94,022 .. $164,132 . $330,903 .. $58,071 Cotton, 78,761 . 119,899

199,871

76,734 Silk, 44,216 .. 53,061

64,275

74,601 Flax,. 80,506 . 110,966 .. 66,070

37,323 Miscellaneous,

51,266.. 65,749. 63,438.. 4,139 Total, .....

$348,771 .. $493,797.. $714,567.. $ 249,868 For consumption,.. 3,545,090 4,218,996 . 4,613,350. 1,721,673

Entered at port, $3,893,861 .. $4,712,793 .. $5,327,907 .. $1,971,641

Upon a review of the dry goods trade for the year, it appears that the entries for consumption are less than one-fourth those of the same period of ten months in 1859, and but little in excess of those of 1860; the following are the results : IMPORTS OF FOREIGN DRY GOODS AT THE PORT OF NEW-YORK FOR TEN MONTHS.

Entered for Consumption.
MANUFACTURES OF 1858.

1859.
1860.

1861. Wool,

$14,899,522 .. $ 29,797,207 .. $ 27,693,715 .. $8,268,143 Cotton,

8,087,121 19,640,906 12,984,731 2,969,667 Silk,

15,824,483 28,631,919 30,756,897 7,685,873 Flax,,.

3,775,793 8,715,678, 5,785,345 .. 1,724,893 Miscellaneous, 2,924,698. 4,936,479. 5,412,817., 1,779,797

Total, ...... $46,511,617 .. $ 91,722,189.. $82,633,505 .. $ 22,428,373

On the other hand, the large amounts withdrawn from warehousing make the total on the market about forty-four per cent. of the same period

last year:

MANUFACTURES OF
Wool,
Cotton,
Silk,
Flax,..
Miscellaneous,

Withdrawn from Warehouse, ten months.
1858.
1859.

1860.
$4,304,226 .. $2,578,390 $3,086,061..

3,344,757 . 1,404,902 2,310,803 .
3,119,963 796,003 1,469,286
1,940,560 880,313 751,946
1,212,109. 354,466. 519,123 .

1861, $5,905,498

3,879,357 4,581,305 1,665,965

715,281

Total, ....
For consumption,..

$ 13,921,615 .
45,511,617.,

$6,014,074 .
91,752,189 ,

$8,137,219 .. $16,747,406 82,633,505 .. 22,428,373

Total on market, $59,433,232 .. $97,736,263 .. $90,770,724 .. $ 39,175,779

Entered for Warehousing, ten months.
MANUFACTURES OF 1858.

1859.
1860.

1861. Wool,

$ 2,003,664.. $3,040,185. $3,270,768 .. $5,635,899 Cotton,

1,726,791 1,383,908 2,359,275. 3,806,670 Silk,

1,076,773 .. 787,544 1,374,788 4,986,950 Flax,

808,779
800,296

494,900 1,396,674 Miscellaneous,

635,160. 436,628. 654,208 .. 870,978

Total,

$6,151,157 .. $6,448,561 .. $ 8,053,939 .. $16,697,171 For consumption,.. 45,511,617.. 91,722,189.. 82,633,505 .. 22,428,373

Entered at port, $81,662,774 .. $98,170,750 .. $ 90,687,555 .. $39,125,644

H

The chief financial item of the month of November has been the successful negotiation of the third instalment of the government loan to the extent of fifty millions of dollars, making in all one hundred and fifty millions of dollars, through the joint action of the banks of New-York, Boston and Philadelphia. The third instalment will be in the shape of six per cent. government bonds, repayable in twenty years, at a price equivalent to a seven per cent. stock; the banks having the option of taking the remaining fifty millions not yet negotiated.

Since our last number went to press, the completion of the telegraphic line from New-York to San Francisco, via St. Louis, has been announced. The following despatch, addressed to the Mayor of this city, came over the wires recently direct from San Francisco:

“ San Francisco, October 25. To the Mayor of New-York :

“San Francisco to New-York sends greetings, and congratulates her on the completion of the enterprise which connects the Pacific with the Atlantic. May the prosperity of both cities be increased thereby, and the projectors of this important work meet with honor and reward.

“ H. F. TESCHEMACHER, Mayor of San Francisco." Mayor Wood sent the following reply: " To the Mayor of San Francisco :

“ New-York returns her greetings to San Francisco. Let the Union thus so happily consummated between them ever remain unimpaired.

“ The Union forever-whether between the East and the West, or the North and the South-let it be continued and preserved.

“ FERNANDO Wood, Mayor." It is stated that the next westward extension of the line will be by the way of Behrings Straits to the mouth of the Amoor River, to which point the Russian government is already constructing a line commencing at Moscow.

B. P. Johnson, Esq., of Albany, is chairman of the Executive Committee of the United States Commissioners appointed by the President of the United States to supervise the American part of the great exhibition in London in 1862. It is highly desirable that our country should be adequately represented, under the rule :

“Her Majesty's Commissioners will communicate only through the commission which the government of each foreign country may appoint; and no article will be admitted from any foreign country without the sanction of such commission.

The articles exhibited will be divided into five classes :

Class 1. Mineral, chemical and pharmaceutical substances and products, food, wines, animal and vegetable substances used in manufactures. 2. Railways, carriages, machines, engineering, naval architecture, philosophical, musical and surgical instruments. 3. Cotton, flax, hemp, wool, silk, fabrics, skins and leather, clothing, paper, stationery, educational appliances, furniture, hardware, iron, steel, cutlery, metals, glass and pottery. 4. Modern art, architecture, sculpture, painting, etching and engraving, &c.

Prizes in the form of medals will be given in sections 1, 2 and 3, but none in No. 4.

Executive Committee, office in the Department of the Interior, Washington, (No. 10 Patent Office Building :)

B. P. Johnson, Chairman, Prof. Jos. Henry,
J. R. PARTRIDGE, Secretary, W. W. SEATON,

J. C. G. KENNEDY. By recent arrangements the postage chargeable upon letters for Penang, Singapore, Hong Kong, and all other parts of China, Japan, Java, the Phillippine Islands, Labuan, Borneo, Siam, Sumatra and the Moluccas, posted in the United States for transmission via the United Kingdom, will hereafter be 45 cents the single rate of half an ounce or under, when directed via Southampton, and 51 cents the quarter ounce, or 57 cents the half-ounce letter when directed via Marseilles, pre-payment compulsory.

In relation to the Canadian rail-roads, the Cincinnati Gazette remarks:

“We understand that the formation of a grand railway combination between Canadian rail-roads is in progress, which is to comprise the Grand Trunk, Great Western and Buffalo and Lake Huron Railways. The plan, as far as matured, seems to be to include into the scheme that portion of the Grand Trunk west of Toronto only, and has for its principal object the discontinuance of a hurtful competition for freight. The triple combination will be under the control of Mr. J. C. Bridges, and it probable that his visit to England at this time is not unconnected with the matter. The natural effect will be to increase the price of freight, and to this extent it will be antagonistic to the interests of the grain producers. Yet it must be remembered that the railways, and especially the Grand Trunk, have frequently carried through freight at a positive loss to the company, and that as it is not impossible that such a state of things should last for any lengthened period, the formation of the union is not a matter for surprise."

An informal meeting of dry goods merchants having claims against Southerners, was held at the Astor House in November, when it was stated that the object of the meeting was for the consideration of some plan by which they might induce the President and Congress to provide for the interests of Northern merchants whose debts have been confiscated by the rebel government, and stated at length the losses which have been incurred by the merchants of the North, the manner in which their debts due had been confiscated, and the necessity for some decided action to be taken by the federal government to secure indemnity. A resolution was adopted, appointing a committee of five to draft a memorial to the President of the United States, asking him to request of Congress to provide some way in which to collect Southern debts. The committee consisted of Messrs. JAFFRAY, CLAFlin, CLEVELAND, SMYTHE and WOODWARD, who are to procure the signatures of merchants to the memorial.

A memorial to the President of the United States, on the same subject, was adopted by the Chamber of Commerce at their monthly meeting, November 7th.

A meeting of merchants was held at New-York, early in November, to discuss the policy of passing a general bankrupt law by the ThirtySeventh Congress. The sense of the meeting, as well as of our merchants generally, is in favor of the passage of such a law.

« EdellinenJatka »