A Course of Lectures on the Steam Engine: Delivered Before the Members of the London Mechanics' Institution

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J. Gifford, 1826 - 92 sivua
 

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Sivu 6 - An admirable and most forcible way to drive up water by fire, not by drawing or sucking it upwards, for that must be as the philosopher calleth it, infra spheeram activitatis, which is but at such a distance. But this way hath no bounder, if the vessels be strong enough ; for I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it...
Sivu 30 - The trunk of an elephant that can pick up a pin or rend an oak is as nothing to it. It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal...
Sivu 27 - ... being unwilling to load my engine with a fly heavy enough to continue the motion during the ascent of the piston...
Sivu 60 - ... on pain of incurring such penalties as may be justly inflicted on such offenders for their contempt of this our Royal command, and of being answerable to the patentee according to law for his damages thereby occasioned...
Sivu 6 - I have taken a piece of a whole cannon, whereof the end was burst, and filled it three quarters full of water, stopping and screwing up the broken end, as also the touch-hole, and, making a constant fire under it, within twenty-four hours it burst, and made a great crack...
Sivu 57 - A description and draught of a new-invented Machine for carrying vessels or ships out of or into any harbour, port, or river against wind and tide, or in a calm, &c.
Sivu 25 - June, 1785, he took out a patent "for certain newly improved methods of constructing " furnaces or fire-places for heating, boiling, or evaporating " of water and other liquids which are applicable to " steam-engines and other purposes, and also for heating, " melting, and smelting of metals and their ores, whereby " greater effects are produced from the fuel, and the smoke is " in a great measure prevented or consumed...
Sivu 51 - P, the Pipe coming from the Furnace to the Cylinder. Q, the Cylinder wherein the steam is condensed. R, the Valve that stops the Steam from coming into the Cylinder, whilst the Steam within the same is condensed. S, the Pipe to convey the condensing Water into the Cylinder. T, a cock to let in the condensing Water when the Cylinder is full of Steam and the Valve, P, is shut. U, a Rope fixed to the Piston that slides up and down in the Cylinder. " Note. This Rope, U, is the same Rope that goes round...
Sivu 51 - ... a large pipe into a cylindrical vessel, and there condensed, makes a vacuum, which causes the weight of the atmosphere to press on this vessel, and so presses down a piston that is fitted into this cylindrical vessel in the same manner as in Mr. Newcomen's engine, 2 with which he raises water by fire.
Sivu 6 - So that, having a way to make my vessels so that they are strengthened by the force within them, and the one to fill after the other, I have seen the water run like a constant fountain stream forty feet high. One vessel of water rarefied by fire driveth up forty of cold water...

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