Sermon Notes of John Henry Cardinal Newman, 1849-1878

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Gracewing Publishing, 2000 - 362 sivua
James Mozley, writing in 1846, said "A sermon of Mr. Newman's enters into our feelings, ideas, modes of viewing things. Persons look into Mr. Newman's sermons and see their own thoughts in them." Unpublished for ninety years, Sermon Notes shows Newman's brilliant mind at work."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
xvi
SERMON NOTES OF JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN
1
ON THE GOSPEL FOR PENTECOST IX CHRIST
8
August
15
October
27
January 6 1850
33
ON THE DOCTRINE OF PRAYER AS RECONCILING
42
December 1 Advent Sunday
52
ON THE GOSPEL OF THE SUNDAYTHE
188
January 1 1865
194
April 3
200
CONTINUING THE SUBJECT OF DIVINE
215
April 28 Fourth Easter
227
August 11 Twelfth Pentecost
236
January 9 1876
264
March 26 Fourth Lent
270

March 9 First Lent
66
April 13 Palm Sunday
75
ON MARY AS THE PATTERN OF THE NATURAL
78
June 8 Whitsunday
86
ON THE PATROCINIUM B V M
92
ON THE EPIPHANY AS CHRISTS REIGN
98
December 25
117
THE RAISING TO LIFE OF THE SON OF
131
April 11 1858 Low Sunday
155
March 10 Fourth Lent
176
April 5 1863 Easter Day
182
June 24 Fifth Pentecost
282
Twentieth Pentecost
288
CATECHETICAL INSTRUCTIONS
289
October 9
296
November 20
302
January 11
308
January 24
315
Sunday afternoon lectures May 8 1859
322
July 3
329
EDITORS NOTES
345
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English clergyman John Henry Newman was born on February 21, 1801. He was educated at Trinity College, University of Oxford. He was the leader of the Oxford movement and cardinal after his conversion to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1822, he received an Oriel College fellowship, which was then the highest distinction of Oxford scholarship, and was appointed a tutor at Oriel. Two years later, he became vicar of St. Mary's, the Anglican church of the University of Oxford, and exerted influence on the religious thought through his sermons. When Newman resigned his tutorship in 1832, he made a tour of the Mediterranean region and wrote the hymn "Lead Kindly Light." He was also one of the chief contributors to "Tracts for the Times" (1833-1841), writing 29 papers including "Tract 90", which terminated the series. The final tract was met with opposition because of its claim that the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England are aimed primarily at the abuses of Roman Catholicism. Newman retired from Oxford in 1842 to the village of Littlemore. He spent three years in seclusion and resigned his post as vicar of St. Mary's on October 9, 1845. During this time, he wrote a retraction of his criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church and after writing his "Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine," he became a Roman Catholic. The following year, he went to Rome and was ordained a priest and entered the Congregation of the Oratory. The remainder of Newman's life was spent in the house of the Oratory that he established near Birmingham. He also served as rector of a Roman Catholic university that the bishops of Ireland were trying to establish in Dublin from 1854-1858. While there, he delivered a series of lectures that were later published as "The Idea of a University Defined" (1873), which says the function of a university is the training of the mind instead of the giving of practical information. In 1864, Newman published "Apologia pro Vita Sua (Apology for His Life)" in response to the charge that Roman Catholicism was indifferent to the truth. It is an account of his spiritual development and regarded as both a religious autobiography and English prose. Newman also wrote "An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent" (1870), and the novels "Loss and Gain" (1848), Callista" (1856) and "The Dream of Gerontius" (1865). Newman was elected an honorary fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, in 1877 and was made cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1879. He died on August 11, 1890.

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