Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

of the Holy Spirit; their

ate and read, is to promote an

Shout the piety, and the right civil and religious rage vain and fra member, dear 13

Denomination fitable for doc 1.

om. for instruct man of G ,

to you the prenished ?

ptist Board, and we fu).

ation to the last, giver

at you will read it ро",

any practicable way sregations the importConformity with it. The ission and churches in the waica imperatively calls upon us vath decision and firmness as the w of the slave. To all his other injuries now added that of a most fierce and cruel persecution for righteousness' sake; a perse cution of such a nature, both in the causes from which it has sprung, and in the spirit by which it has been marked, as leads at once to the conclusion that the existence of Christianity is incompatible any longer with the existence of slavery, and that one or the other in that colony must cease. The ensuing elections will afford an opportunity of all others the most favourable for the expression of feel. ings on the subject; and such is the state of the public mind, that nothing more seems required than for the various communities of dissenters to act in concert on the occasion, to secure such a return of members to the Commons House of Parliament, as will give the fairest promise of effecting the entire and speedy extinction of the negro's wrongs. I am therefore desired to represent to you the great importance of bringing the subject dis. tinctly under the notice of your friends at this particular crisis, that all of them who may now have to exercise the elective fran. chise may require a pledge, from the candi. dates to whom their votes are given, that they will support the cause of immediate emancipation."

I am, dear Brethren, men
Yours truly,

w

J. B. SHENSTON, July 10th, 1832. T H Secretary.

bled, the

[ocr errors]

all iniquity, and purify, us unto himself. How essential, then, is it to each of us, that we seek to be cleansed from every sin, and henceforward to live in all righteousness and holiness! This change of heart can only be brought about by the power of the grace of God; the Comforter, the Spirit of Truth, is to guide us into all truth; Christ bas de clared himself to be the bread of life. He is not only the light of the world, but the life of men.

Dear Friends, wbat do we individually know of that life which is hid with Christ in God? Is be the rock on which our foundation is laid? Do we feel him to be our shepherd to lead us; our teacher to instruct us; the bishop of our souls to watch over us? Do we know him, in our own experience, to be the High Priest of our profession, who : touched with a feeling of our infirmities. . through whom we come unto God? A . engrafted into him, the true vine, deriv rishment immediately from him ? Ca' the history of his sufferings and

d a tes sakes, as described by the evang womote the

omote the the Son of God himself who avery. herein set forth; it was he“ bring or Secretary. all the treasures of wisdom t orony Let this excite in your own enormity of sin, seein f ause of

e of Commons counsels of the Fathe webbed the petition of deemed needful for considerations, if lead you to prep without which

s, fully convinced that vour, in prive

uniformly guided souls in secr

The Baptist Missionary recorded fo

accorded with the pa in the dar

bel; and equally satisfied from his

begons in Jamaica have acted God. 1

the instructions given that"

view with indignation

ate those missionaries as contri

insurrection, and rejoice those who are the late mphant manner in which

poes have been refuted.

setitioners contemplate with evi

bathy, the violent and illegal he

10

mitted on the persons and fa. huid missionaries, and the serious ved in the destruction of the So

. and earnestly implore from Tip's propeable House redress for the past

Hon for the future, more especially

tioners humbly conceive that the e of which they complain are to

iance with the British constitution sult to the dignity of the throne. Four petitioners are fully convinced, decided hostility which has conbeen shown by the great body of olders to the labours of Christian mis

jes, that the system of slavery is irreWileably opposed to the progress of the el, and therefore do earnestly pray that

Honourable House will, without further Salay, adopt such measures as to your wis

assegurars, meeting at Fen

sicuting the Baptist

Masters, m dud, constitutina be showeth,

petitioners, fully

ruh have uniformu

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

a brok

[ocr errors]

Gerture strictly accord ngunit of the gospel; and ut the movionaries in

atelormity with the then br the society, via

empt to criminate those

[ocr errors]

perf

[ocr errors]

r ies in the late insur
in the signally triumph
those base charges hay

That your petition
the liveliest sympathy
outrages committed
milies of the said mis
losses sustained in

your Honourable and protection for

s pour petitioners hun

proceedings of why tally at variance wi and an insult to

That your petitio from the decides stantly been sho slave-holders to sionaries, that th

BEULAH Spa, NORWOOD. It is equally due to the Christian public, and to the excellent and spirited proprietor of this enchanting spot, to notice some of its claims on their support. The grounds, which are very ex. tensive, and which present some of the loveliest prospects in England, are laid out with singular taste, and present to the admirer of nature every thing that is calculated to enliven the spirit and invigorate the health. The water is proved, by the analysis of Hume and Farraday, to be one third stronger in saline matter than Cheltenham, and to possess a

gospel, and

Every subscriber will be pleased to ex. press, if any, and what, proportion of his subscription he wishes to be applied to the rebuilding of the chapel and school-house, See Advertisement on the cover.

much larger portion of carbonic acid, which • gives to it a sparkling and transparent ap

pearance, and renders it grateful to the palate, Several physicians, who have had patients re. siding ai the spring, affirm that it is useful in all those diseases for the relief and cure of which Cheltenham has been so long and so deservedly celebrated. The peculiar recommendations of the spa (independent of its proximity to London) are the singular beauty of its scenery, and the fascinating arrangement of its walks ; and, to the Christian, it has several attractions which should secure for it a preference to any other similar place of resort. It is rigidly closed on the sabbath, notwithstanding the importunate solicitations of multitudes, and many of them of the high est rank. In this respect it stands alone; and the determination of the proprietor of the grounds, that they shall not be opened on that day, redounds much to his credit and consistency. On other days the arrangements are such as exclude all improper company, so that the most fastidious and timid" may rove here without the possibility of annoyance, Many whose limited incomes, or en, gagements in business, or from other causes, could never visit Cheltenham, and obtain the inestimable blessing of health from its salubrious springs, may now secure all its benefits within seven miles of the metropolis ; and the Christian may not only be kept out of the sphere of dissipation of a fashionable water. ing-place, but, by saving the expense of tra. velling to a distance, have something more wherewith to advance the interests of the Redeemer's kingdom.

REVIVAL IN WALES. Sır,--As nothing can interest Christians more than to hear of the advancement of reli. gion, I beg leave to congratulate you on the subject of a revival in North Wales, ever since the day of humiliation and prayer appointed to be held in March last. On that day there were more people than ordinary, of all ranks and ages, in every place of worship through the whole country : a great fervency of prayer was manifested; and it is thought that the Lord has poured his Spirit on the churches, from the results; as many, many, are now crying out for mercy, especially among the young people of Sunday schools. Others of harder hearts, who were hitherto ready to mock at the fervour shown by the awakened, have been struck with such con, cern for their salvation as to become even more vociferous than they.

Prayer-meetings are frequently held through the night, among the poor slate quarrymen; their voices in singing and praying being heard miles off. Last week å brother minister from Denbigh informed me that about two hundred have joined different societies of Christians there, being roused, it is thought, by the visitation of the cholera. May it please the Almighty to kindle this spark into à flame, and that the shaking of the dry bones may quicken into life and immortality! Llanrwst, July 23, 1832.

. D.

PROVINCIAL. GREAT AND DESTRUCTIVE FIRE AT BRADNINCH,

DEVON. We regret to state that, on the 18th of July, an alarming fire broke out at Bradninch, which, in the course of two hours, destroyed forty-eight houses, together with a Baptist Chapel and a new school-house adjoining. This disaster has reduced numerous families to a state of the greatest destitution. A more legitimate claim to commiseration has rarely been presented to the public, and an earnest hope is indulged that Christian sympathy will alleviate in some measure the aggravated distress which now reigns in Bradninch.

Henry Bowden, Esq., the Mayor, with a committee of gentlemen, have undertaken to apply in the most equitable and judicious way whatever contributions may be obtained by this appeal to the benevolent.

Subscriptions, we understand, will be received by Hankeys and Co., Bankers, 7, Fenchurch Street; also by Holdsworth and Ball, 18, St. Paul's Church-yard; Messrs. Westley and Davis, 10, Stationers' Court; and by Mr. George Wightman, 24, Paternoster

WESTERN ACADEMY. The anniversary of this institution, which took place on the 26th and 27th of June, at the house at Exeter which has been recently purchased for its use, was attended by a numerous company of ministers, subscribers. and friends of the institution. On the former day, the students were examined by a committee appointed for that purpose, who make the following report.

“We have been highly gratified with the results of a long and scrutinizing examination of the students, in theology, Hebrew, Latin and Greek classics, mathematics, natural philosophy, and mental science; time not permitting them to enter into all the subjects of the course of study for the year, This examination equally evinced the zeal and fidelity with which the highly esteemed tutors have discharged the duties of their respective departments, and the application and diligence with which the young men have prosecuted their various studies."

On the latter day the general business of the institution was transacted, and in the

Row.

dom shall seem meet, for the immediate and entire abolition of that system throughout the British dominions.”

persons and families of the missionaries, call for the liveliest sympathy; and this Board confidently trusts that the appeal which has been made to the British Government for protection and redress will be effectual, more especially as such proceedings are directly at variance with the British constitution and an insult to the dignity of the throne.

3. That the decided hostility which has been shown on former occasions, as well as on the present, by slave-holders to the labours of Christian missionaries, affords a convince ing proof that the system is irreconcileably opposed to the progress of the gospel, and ought therefore no longer to be protected by the British government.

4. That à petition, founded on the foregoing resolutions, be forthwith presented to both Houses of Parliament; and that as a general election is expected speedily to take place, this Board call upon their friends possessing the elective franchise throughout the United Kingdom to support such candidates only as will pledge themselves to promote the immediate and entire abolition of slavery.

J. B. Shenston, Secretary.

To the Honourable the House of Commons in Parliament assembled, the petition of the undersigned Ministers, meeting at Fen Court, London, constituting the Baptist Board, humbly showeth,

“ That your petitioners, fully convinced that the principles which have uniformly guided the proceedings of the Baptist Missionary Society have strictly accorded with the pacific spirit of the gospel; and equally satisfied that their missionaries in Jamaica have acted in conformity with the instructions given them by the society, view with indignation the attempt to criminate those missionaries as parties in the late insurrection, and rejoice in the signally triumphant manner in which those base charges have been refuted..

" That your petitioners contemplate with the liveliest sympathy, the violent and illegal outrages committed on the persons and fa. milies of the said missionaries, and the serious losses sustained in the destruction of the Society's property, and earnestly implore from your Honourable House redress for the past and protection for the future, more especially as your petitioners humbly conceive that the proceedings of which they complain are to. tally at variance with the British constitution and an insult to the dignity of the throne.

"That your petitioners are fully convinced, from the decided hostility which has constantly been shown by the great body of slave-holders to the labours of Christian missionaries, that the system of slavery is irre. concileably opposed to the progress of the gospel, and therefore do earnestly pray that your Honourable House will, without further delay, adopt such measures as to your wis

To the Ministers of the Baptist Denomination

throughout the Kingdom. . Dear Brethren,

I am directed to transmit to you the pre. ceding resolutions of the Baptist Board, and especially to call your attention to the last, with an earnest request that you will read it from your pulpits, and in any practicable way enforce upon your congregations the import. ance of acting in conformity with it. The state of our mission and churches in the island of Jamaica imperatively calls upon us to act with decision and firmness as the friends of the slave. To all his other injuries is now added that of a most fierce and cruel persecution for righteousness' sake; a perse. cution of such a nature, both in the causes from which it has sprung, and in the spirit by which it has been marked, as leads at once to the conclusion that the existence of Chris. tianity is incompatible any longer with the existence of slavery, and that one or the other in that colony must cease. The ensuing elections will afford an opportunity of all others the most favourable for the expression of feel. ings on the subject; and such is the state of the public mind, that nothing more seems required than for the various communities of dissenters to act in concert on the occasion, to secure such a return of members to the Commons House of Parliament, as will give the fairest promise of effecting the entire and speedy extinction of the negro's wrongs. I am therefore desired to represent to you the great importance of bringing the subject dis. tinctly under the notice of your friends at this particular crisis, that all of them who may now have to exercise the elective fran. chise may require a pledge, from the candidates to whom their votes are given, that they will support the cause of immediate emancipation.

I am, dear Brethren,
Yours truly,

J. B. SHENSTON,
July 10th, 1832.

Secretary

BEULAH SPA, NORWOOD. It is equally due to the Christian public, and to the excellent and spirited proprietor of this enchanting spot, to notice some of its claims on their support. The grounds, which are very extensive, and which present some of the loveliest prospects in England, are laid out with singular taste, and present to the admirer of nature every thing that is calculated to enliven the spirit and invigorate the health. The water is proved, by the analysis of Hume and Farraday, to be one third stronger in saline matter than Cheltenham, and to possess a

Every subscriber will be pleased to express, if any, and what, proportion of his subscription he wishes to be applied to the rebuilding of the chapel and school-house, See Advertisement on the cover.

much larger portion of carbonic acid, which gives to it a sparkling and transparent appearance, and renders it grateful to the palate, Several physicians, who have had patients re. siding ai the spring, affirm that it is useful in all those diseases for the relief and cure of which Cheltenham has been so long and so deservedly celebrated. The peculiar recommendations of the spa (independent of its proximity to London) are the singular beauty of its scenery, and the fascinating arrange ment of its walks ; and, to the Christian, it has several attractions which should secure for it a preference to any other similar place of resort. It is rigidly closed on the sabbath, notwithstanding the importunate solicitations of multitudes, and many of them of the highest rank. In this respect it stands alone; and the determination of the proprietor of the grounds, that they shall not be opened on that day, redounds much to his credit and consistency. On other days the arrangements are such as exclude all improper company, so that the most fastidious and timid may rove here without the possibility of annoy. ance. Many whose limited incomes, or en. gagements in business, or from other causes, could never visit Cheltenham, and obtain the inestimable blessing of health from its salubrious springs, may now secure all its benefits within seven miles of the metropolis; and the Christian may not only be kepi out of the sphere of dissipation of a fashionable water. ing-place, but, by saving the expense of tra. velling to a distance, have something more wherewith to advance the interests of the Redeemer's kingdom.

REVIVAL IN WALES. SIR, -As nothing can interest Christians more than to hear of the advancement of religion, I beg leave to congratulate you on the subject of a revival in North Wales, ever since the day of humiliation and prayer appointed to be held in March last. On that day there were more people than ordinary, of all ranks and ages, in every place of worship through the whole country: a great fervency of prayer was manifested; and it is thought that the Lord has poured his Spirit on the churches, from the results; as many, many, are now crying out for mercy, especially among the young people of Sunday schools. Others of harder hearts, who were hitherto ready to mock at the fervour shown by the awakened, have been struck with such con. cern for their salvation as to become even more vociferous than they

Prayer-meetings are frequently held through the night, among the poor slate quarrymen; their voices in singing and praying being heard miles off. Last week a brother mic nister from Denbigh informed me that about two hundred have joined different societies of Christians there, being roused, it is thought, by the visitation of the cholera. May it please the Almighty to kindle this spark into a flame, and that the shaking of the dry bones may quicken into life and immortality!

Llanrwst, July 23, 1832.

PROVINCIAL. GREAT AND DESTRUCTIVE FIRE AT BRADNINCH,

DEVON. We regret to state that, on the 18th of July, an alarming fire broke out at Bradninch, which, in the course of two hours, destroyed forty-eight houses, together with a Baptist Chapel and a new school-house adjoining. This disaster has reduced numerous families to a state of the greatest destitution. A more legitimate claim to commiseration has rarely been presented to the public, and an earnest hope is indulged that Christian sympathy will alleviate in some measure the aggravated distress which now reigns in Bradninch.

Henry Bowden, Esq., the Mayor, with a committee of gentlemen, bave undertaken to apply in the most equitable and judicious way whatever contributions may be obtained by this appeal to the benevolent.

Subscriptions, we understand, will be received by Hankeys and Co., Bankers, 7, Fenchurch Street: also by Holdsworth and Ball, 18, St. Paul's Church-yard ; Messrs. Westa ley and Davis, 10, Stationers' Court; and by Mr. George Wightman, 24, Paternoster

WESTERN ACADEMY. The anniversary of this institution, which took place on the 26th and 27th of June, at the house at Exeter which has been recently purchased for its use, was attended by a numerous company of ministers, subscribers, and friends of the institution. On the former day, the students were examined by a committee appointed for that purpose, who make the following report.

“We have been highly gratified with the results of a long and scrutinizing examination of the students, in theology, Hebrew, Latin and Greek classics, mathematics, natural philosophy, and mental science; time not permitting them to enter into all the subjects of the course of study for the year. This examination equally evinced the zeal and fidelity with which the highly esteemed tutors have discharged the duties of their respective departments, and the application and diligence with which the young men have prosecuted their various studies.”

On the latter day the general business of the institution was transacted, and in the

Row.

evening, Mr. Edwards, one of the senior stu. dents, delivered an essay, in Castle-street chapel, on the difference between natural and moral inability

GLOUCESTERSHIRE ASSOCIATION. The Anniversary of the Gloucestershire Independent Benevoleut Society will be held, God willing, at Chalford, on Wednesday, October 10. The Committee will meet at the house of the Rev. T. Whitta, at ten o'clock in the morning. The public services will be at half past two and six o'clock. In consequence of the lamented death of the Rev. William Bishop, of Gloucester, the faithful secretary of the society, it is ex. tremely desirable that there should be a full attendance of members at the appointed hour for the meeting of the Committee.

ROTHERHAM COLLEGE. On Wednesday, June 27th, was held the annual meeting of the subscribers and friends of Rotherham college, at which several re. solutions were passed, and the usual business of the college transacted. The preceding day the examining committee were occupied in investigating the progress of the students, and from their report it would appear that there is the highest reason to be satisfied with their diligence and attainments, and with the attention of their tutors. They obe serve that they are compelled to declare them. selves not merely satisfied, but even sur. prised, with the general improvement of the young men, and they deem it alike creditable to their own application and industry and to the care and skill of their tutors, while they feel justified in anticipating, from a beginning so auspicious, a very respectable degree of scholarship at the end of their academical course, and their entrance upon the duties and relations of the Christian ministry. The general report announced the bequest of a legacy from the late Miss Elizabeth Walker, of £300; from the late Mr. Townsend, of London, £100 ; and from the late Mr. Josiah Parry, of Shrewsbury, £10.

CHRISTIAN EFFORTS ON BEHALF OF THE

CONTINENT. At the Annual General Meeting of the North

Riding Association of Independent Ministers and Congregations, held at Malton, May 30th, 1832,

Resolved Unanimously, That believing the entire extinction of the Roman Catholic religion is rendered certain by abundant divine promise, and cannot be very distant, and that it is high time to use active measures avowedly for this object, this meeting requests the attention of their Protestant Dissenting brethren throughout the kingdom to the fact, that while we have combined in missionary exertions for overthrowing, as our God may prosper us, the idolatry of distant nations, we have made no united effort towards subverting that of continental Europe, to which recent providential openings seem particularly to invite; and submits to their consideration whether it be our duty, as strenuous Protestants, to unite for this obiect, either by joining the British Reformation Society, or by forming a separate institution.

KENT ASSOCIATION. The Annual Meeting of the Kent Inde. nendent Association was held at the Rev. i. J. Rook's. Faversham, on Tuesday and Wednesday, July 3rd and 4th. The Rev. J. Prankard, of Sheerness, preached on Tues. day evening, from Luke xvii. 20: "The kingdom of God cometh not with observation;" and the Rev. W. Chapman, of Greenwich, on Wednesday morning, from James v. 19, 20. The business of the Association was transacted in the afternoon. The atten. tion of the brethren present having been directed to the government plan for educating the poor of Ireland, the following resolution was unanimously adopted in

" That the Members of this Association feeling deeply concerned for the advancement of the cause of general education in Ireland, and conscientiously believing that the plan proposed by his Majesty's Ministers is eminently adapted to effect the end intended, would express their cordial appro. bation of that measure, and their earnest hope that it will be carried into universal operation."

The Rev. T. James having resigned his office as Secretary to the Association, the Rev. H. J. Rook, of Faversham, was ap. pointed in his stead,

SCHOOL FOR THE SONS OF MINISTERS, SIL

COATES, YORKSHIRE. The first anniversary of this useful insti. tution was held on Wednesday, July 4th, and drew together a considerable number of ministers, and of other friends, to whom the results of the day were highly gratifying. The Rev. R. W. Hamilton, of Leeds, pre. sided at the examination of the pupils, the several classes reading in the Delectus, Cæsar, Virgil, Horace, and Cicero, in the Latin; and in the New Testament and Euri. pides in the Greek. They were also exercised in geography, history, the mathematics, and produced specimens of their abilities in writing, mapping, English composition, &c. Prizes of books were then conferred upon those pupils who had distinguished themselves in their respective classes, and the general exercises of the school. Immediately after this, the public meeting of the supporters of the institution was held ; the trea:

« EdellinenJatka »