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Tons; fucceeds Aourish ; a their gror

to moral good and evil; and that in other instana ces as well as this..

We observe all through nature a vicissitude, a decay or ceffation of natural powers, and a restora: tion of them; a kind of death, and a reviviscence. Most creatures have alternate times for Neep and waking, and most countries have change of fea. Tons ; night succeeds day, and day returns, the cold season succeeds the warm, and the warm 'returns : The vegetables flourish ; autumnal blasts ftrip them of their leaves, and stop their growth, and all na tural functions feem to be at an end : The spring, in its turn, rousęs stupid nature, and all things bloom afresh : The reptile feasts upon the produce of nature during the plenty of Summer ; in the Wins ter he becomes a Cbryfalis, and lies in his hard cloathing like a coffin ; till the vernal sun awakes him, or rather raises him from a state of death : The birds, enjoying themselves 'one part of the year, lie buried in decayed trees, and antient walls, the rest of it, and come forth again in their seasons. Most animals lie, as it were, intombed in their mos thers, and their birth is a rising from death. --Shall all nature thus be subject to this vicissitude of death, and a resurrection, and man alone be excepted ? No: The anaingy of things teaches us, that the human body all rise again, and revelation assures us of it. If man's sleep be a little longer than that of his kindred creatures, lo shall be the life, to which he rises : They awake to sport for a season, he shall be raised to eternal pleasure.

This argument from natural phænomena, for a resurrection of the body, appeared to St. Paul worth insisting upon; when, from the nature of vegetation in a grain of wheat, he argues very justly

to the nature of our bodily resurrection. Whereas · moft feeds consist of two, and many of more lobes,

it is peculiar to corn to have but one: And whereas the lobes of other feeds generally rise above the

ground

ground, in what are called, dissimilar leaves, it is per culiar to the lobe of corn to die beneath the earth. St. Paul's argument is therefore founded upon the truth of nature: Ibou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die ; and that which thou fowest, thou fowejt not that body that ball be, but bare Grain, it may chance of wheat, or of fome-otber grain : But God giveth it a body, as it bath pleased. bim, and to every seed its own body.

Our Saviour also argued with the Pharisees and Sadducees from natural phænomena: They demanded a sign, to whom he replies: When it is evening, ye fay, it will be fair weather, for the sky is red; and in the morning, it will be foul weather to-day, for the sky is red and louring. O ye hypocrites, ye can discern the face of the sky, but can ye not discern the signs of the times ? He also uses arguments of the same kind upon many occasions, some of which have been mentioned in the beginning of this discourse.

. See Grews anatome of plants, and address, &c. or part 1. of this book. By considering what is there expreft concerning this passage, along with what is delivered here, the reader has the full analogical sense.

THE THE

ANALOGY

OF

DIVINE WISDOM,

BETWEEN
Material LIGHT, and spiritual KNOWLEDGE.

BETWEEN
The general Law of Spiritual BEINGS,

AND
The general Law of Material THINGS.

BETWEEN
The Divine Influence upon Spirit by GRACE,

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AND THE

Divine Influence upon Matter by ATTRACTION.

enca

BE T W E EN

The UNIVERSAL ÆTHER,

AND THE INFINITE DIVINE SPIRIT.

PART III.

DU B L IN:
Printed in the Year MDCCL.

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N O T to enter too far into nature, for abstruse

and forced resemblances of things, let us only consider the clear obvious and natural Analogies,

BETWEEN
Material LIGHT, and spiritual KNOWLEDGE.

BETWEEN
The general Law of Spiritual BEINGS,

AND
The general Law of Material THINGS.

- BETWEEN The divine Influence upon Spirit by GRACE,

w AND THE Divine Influence upon Matter by ATTRACTION.

BETWEEN
The UNIVERSAL ÆTHER,

AND THE INFINITE DIVINE SPIRIT.

IGHT is the first of God's creatures in the material world. For darkness is not a

being, but the absence of one ; and the Heavens and the earth previous to light in the order of history being without form, were only the subject matter susceptive of forms, animate and inanimate, which are called the creatures of God. The divine historian declares light to be good, as soon as it was created, and although he distinguisheth ir from darkness, he doth not thereby make darkness a creature : For it wants the divine FIAT; Let

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