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SUMMARY

O V

GEOGRAPHY And HISTORY,

Both ANCIENT And MODERN;

CONTAINING,

Ad Account of the Political State, and Principal Revolutions
of the most Illustrious Nations in Ancient and Modern Times i
their Manners and Customs; the Local Situation of Cities,
especially of such as have been distinguished by Memorable
Events:

WITH

An Abridgement of the Fabulous History or Mythology
of the Greeks.

To Which Is Prefixed,

As Historical Account of the Progress and Improvements of Astronomy and
Geographv, from the Earliest Periods to the time of Sir Isaac Newton:
Also, a brief Account of the Principles of the NEWTONIAN PHILOSO-
PHY, occasionally compared with the Opinions of the Ancients, concerning
the General and Particular Properties of Matter; the Air, Heat
and Cold, Light, and its effects; the Laws of Motion; the Planetarv
Ststem, &c.—^With a Short Description of the Component Parts of the
Terraqueous Globe, according to the Notions of the Ancients, and the
more accurate discoveries of Modern Chemists. t -.

hy.t^.j- ..if
Designed chiefly to connect the Study of Classical Learning
with that of General Knowledge.

By ALEXANDER ADAM, LL. D.

RECTOR OF THE HIGH SCHOOL OF EDINBURGH.

EDINBURGH:

Printed for T. CADELL and A. STRAHAN, London.

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PREFACE,

nPHE usefulness of Classical Learning is universally J. acknowledged; but it has been alledged, that the time requisite for acquiring it prevents a sufficient attention from being paid to General Knowledge. The most effecr tual method, however, of prosecuting the study of both, seems to be to join them together. The clastic authors, particularly the poets, cannot be thoroughly understood, without a considerable acquaintance with those branches of science to which they often allude; geography, history, philosophy, astronomy, and above all mythology. To connect, therefore, the study of classical learning with that of general knowledge, is the design of the following work.

On a subject so immense, it was impossible to be minute. The compiler has endeavoured to select such particulars as appeared most important; and it is hoped, that few things of consequence, which are requisite to illustrate the classics, will be found omitted. Throughout the whole work, he has borrowed with freedom from every author from; whom he could derive information; and where books 'faijecl ,'Ju'tn, he has had recourse to such persons as were bttstpable to give him assistance. He owes, on this account, obligations to several gentlemen, particularly to one, for valuable communications concerning Mathematics and Natural History. The historical account of astronomy is extracted chiefly from the elegant work of the unfortunate

M.

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