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Teokset Teokset 1 - 10 / 75 haulle For, from our very faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow....
" For, from our very faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow weaker. Thoughts, by often passing through the mind, are felt less sensibly: being accustomed to danger, begets intrepidity, ie lessens fear; to distress, lessens the passion... "
Woman's rights and duties considered with relation to their influence on ... - Sivu 83
tekijä(t) Woman - 1840
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The Panoplist, and Missionary Magazine United, Nide 5

1810
...moral considerations. For, from our very faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being re. peated, grow weaker; thoughts, by often passing through the mind, are felt less sensibly." 4. The drift of these remarks, I hope, will not be misconceived. My object is not to repress dc. votional...

Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind

Dugald Stewart - 1813 - 509 sivua
...by often passing through the mind, " are felt less sensibly : being accustomed to danger, be" gets intrepidity, ie lessens fear ; to distress, lessens...And from these *' two observations together, that praci.ical habits are form" ed and strengthened by repeated acts ; and that passive " impressions grow...

Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind

Dugald Stewart - 1813 - 509 sivua
...insensibility " to all moral obligations. For, from our very faculty of " habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow " weaker. Thoughts, by often...are felt less sensibly : being accustomed to danger, be" gets intrepidity, ie lessens fear ; to distress, lessens the " passion of pity ; to instances of...

Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Nide 1

Dugald Stewart - 1814
...faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow U. chap. 6. (Page 56 of TAILOR'* TnmL) " weaker. Thoughts, by often passing through the mind,...own. And from these two observations together, that prac" tical habits are formed and strengthened by repeated acts ; and " that passive impressions grow...

The Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and ...

Joseph Butler, Samuel Hallifax - 1819 - 239 sivua
...insensibility to all moral considerations. For, from our very faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow weaker. Thoughts, by often...ie lessens fear; to distress, lessens the passion ef pity; to instances of other's mortality, lessens the sensible apprehension of our own. And from...

The Analogy of Religion, Natural and Revealed, to the Constitution and ...

Joseph Butler - 1820 - 239 sivua
...insensibility to all moral considerations. For, from our very faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow weaker. Thoughts, by often...distress, lessens the passion of pity; to instances of other's mortality, lessens the sensible apprehension of our own. And from these two observations together,...

Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Nide 1

Dugald Stewart - 1821
...insensibility to all moral obligations. For, from our very faculty of habits, pasi sive impressions, by being repeated, grow weaker. Thoughts, by often...less sensibly : being accustomed to danger, begets ini trepidity, ie lessens fear ; to distress, lessens the passion of pity ; to instances 'of others'...

Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Niteet 1–2

Dugald Stewart - 1821
...insensibility to all moral obligations. For, from our very faculty of habits, pas" >ive impressions, by being repeated, grow weaker. Thoughts, by often passing " through the mind, arejklt less sensibly : being accustomed to danger, begets iu" trepidity, ie lessensTear ; to distress,...

Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, Niteet 1–2

Dugald Stewart - 1822
...faculty of habits, pas" sive impressions, by being repented, grow weaker. Thoughts, by often passing1 " through the mind, are felt less sensibly : being accustomed to danger, begets in"trepidi'y, ie lessens fear; to distress, lessens the passion of pity ; to instances "of others'...

The semi-sceptic; or, The common sense of religion considered

John Thomas James (bp. of Calcutta.) - 1825
...insensibility to all moral considerations : for, from our very faculty of habits, passive impressions, by being repeated, grow weaker : thoughts, by often...are felt less sensibly : being accustomed to danger, lessens fear ; to distress, lessens the passion of pity,' &c. &c. (Analogy of Religion, Natural and...




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