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FROM JUDGE WAYNE, ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME

COURT OF THE UNITED STATES.

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Dear Sir,

Supreme Court-room, March 3, 1847. I very much obliged to you for your edition of the Con.

. stitution, and will not, hereafter, other. All of much indebted to you. Permit me to make a suggestion.

It is, that

would

you add to the edition, intended for distribution by the Senate, a statenient of the times when the Constitution was

adopted by the states, and when new states have been admitted; particularly designating, in the last, such of them as have been admittes upon constitutions formed before there had been

any original tion by Congress for admitting them. For reference it would be useful in many discussions, and has not been made, so far S find, by any one. Dear Sir, with

Your obed't sero't, James M. Wayne

. W. Scickey, Esq., Washington.

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great regard,

FROM THE CHIEF JUSTICE OF THE SUPREME COURT OF PENN

SYLVANIA.

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Philadelphia, 3d Albarch, 1847. I have attentively perused a recent edition of the Federal Constitution, with a well-digested analysis and other matter appended, " by a citizen;" and, it gives me pleasure to ,

say, compilation is, not only a convenient book of reference, but an

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* In compliance with this friendly suggestion of Judge Wayne, the author has derived much satisfaction in devoting to it the entire 10th chapter of this edition.

The first edition of this book.

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iwaluable compendium of political statistics for every day's The arrangement is an excellent one. In the Wied States, it is the duty of every man to take a part in the political ments of the day, and the book ought therefore to be in the hands of the masses :

Pennsylvania, it ought to be a text-book in the common schools. The compiler is personally unknown to but I am happy to give my testimony in favour of the

of merits of his production.

With

four obedient servant,

John B. Gibson.

me,

great respect, Sir,

Cl. Y6ickey.

FROM THE JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE UNITED

STATES FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF PENNSYLVANIA.

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Dear Sir,

I have looked through the little volume which has been pre. pared, as I understand, under your charge, and I have really been surprised to find, in so compact a form, so many important subjects of constant reference.

The analytical index of topics embraced in the Federal Constitution is well devised, and, so far as I have tested its accuracy:

bears proofs of care and skill. The several doew. ments and tables, which form the rest of the book, are

of the book, are judiciously selected from numerous volumes, which are not generally sible, and they present a series of annals of the Constitution, from the first movement towards its formation, in 1786. obliged to you for the

copy

which has been sent to me, and shall, no doubt, have frequent

Very respectfully, yours, Col. Yfickey

J.K. Kanc. Philad. 3 Mar. 1847.

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I'ROM THE HONORABLE SIDNEY BREESE, SENATOR OF THE

UNITED STATES.

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Welbydear Sir, Washington, Albarch 6, 1847.

I have examined, with great care, your edition of the Con. stitution of the United States

, and I must be permited to ex. press my approval of the plan and of the merits of the worlu. I do hope it will have a very extensive demand—that the state legislatures will patronize it, and that its circulation

may extensive wih the limits of our Union. It is a lamentable faci, that the Constitution of the United States—that most honored work of the patriots and sages of the Revolution—has not yet had a general circulation. I hope it may be introduced into our schools

, aca lemies, and all our seminaries of learning, and

. studied to be understood. You, sir, are entitled to great credit for the care and ability you have shown in preparing the present edition. I hope you and the country will profit by it.

. Yro, very truly, Cl. W. YEickey.

Sidney Breese.

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FROM THE CHIEF JUSTII'E OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE

UNITED STATES FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

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Washington, D. C., q. 8, 1847. Wm. Yfickey, Esq.

Dear Sir,
I requested by my

brethren on the bench of the Creuit Court of the District of Columbia to thank you for your new and corrected edition of the Constitution of the United States, which

you have kudly sent to them, and for the valuable statistic information annexed to it;

and

esfie. cially for the laborious and very particular analysis which you have made of the Constitution, and for the correction of the

in the text,

as

as

errors in punctuation, well

which

you

have discovered in the former editions.

The Fudges have not had time to examine the text very carefully; but, from the partial examination they have had time to make, and the great care with which your copy has been com. pared with the original in the Department of State

, they believe it to be the most correct copy extant, and they have no doubt it will be useful to all classes of society.

With
great respect, Sam, d'r Sir,
four obed't serv't

,
W? Cranch.

FROM THE HONORABLE SILAS WRIGHT, LATE GOVERNOR OF

NEW YORK-FORMERLY SENATOR IN CONGRESS.

and

Canton, 9 April, 1847. My dear Sir, I thank

you for the copy of your edition of the Constitution of the Vanited States, with your copious index. The design, and the manner of its execution, are alike creditable to

you, S anticipate a wide circulation of the little volume, and great usefulness to our free institutions from it.

Many of the editions of the Constitution of the Writed States, in most common circulation, are very carelessly printed, with frequent erroneous punctuation, often increasing the doubts as to the true construction of the paragraphs. An edition, therefore, known to be correctly published, is of great value.

Your copious analytical index, however, constitutes the real value of your book. If studied faithfully, and by an unbiassed mind, it will lead it to read the Constitution practically, and to understand it as it is. Roeferring, as the analysis does, every

. provision and clause to its practical application in the affairs of the government, it cannot fail to have a natural and powerful

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our statesmen

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tendency towards a strict construction of the instrument in the mind of the scholar,—the only construction of the Constitution safe to our free institutions and to the Constitution itself.

No one, familiar with the affairs of our government, have failed to notice how large a proportion of appear never to have read the Constitution of the United States with a careful reference to its precise language and exact pro. visions, but rather, as occasion presents, seem to exercise their ingenuity, unfortunately too often powerful and powerfully exerted, to stretch both to the line of what they, at the moment,

consider expedient. A reference to a careful; perfect, and full analysis

. of that instrument, and of the grants of power really found in it, cannot fail to exert a strong and salutary influence upon such minds.

It is, however, upon the mind of the student and the rising generation of our country that I anticipate the widely extended

I useful influence of your book. If it shall be, as I hope it may, introduced as a class-book in our schools, it cannot fail ,

' soon to produce a more sound and correct and uniform under. standing of the Constitution as it is, than has hitherto prevailed

It has long been a favorite wish of mine, as to this state, that our public laws of universal interest

may

Legisla. ture, distributed to our common schools in a form to be made a class-book for the more advanced scholars, that the current legis. Pation of the state may be early and thoroughly understood by

" those who are to be the voters of the state.

four book suggests the addition of the Constitution of the State, with a full index, such that

you

have prepared for the Federal Constitution, as a permanent class-book to precede the study of the current laws; and, if your Constitution and the laws of Congress of a general character and universal public interest could be connected with the course of study, I do not

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