Utopia: Or the Happy Republic, a Philosophical Romance. To which is Added, the New Atlantis, by Lord Bacon; with an Analysis of Plato's Republic, and Copious Notes by J. A. St. John, Esq

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Sivu 38 - The end then of learning is to repair the ruins of our first parents by regaining to know God aright, and out of that knowledge to love him, to imitate him, to be like him, as we may the nearest by possessing our souls of true virtue, which being united to the heavenly grace of faith, makes up the highest perfection.
Sivu 253 - The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible.
Sivu xliii - Wherein of antres vast and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process: And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Sivu 185 - With antique pillars massy proof, And storied windows richly dight, Casting a dim religious light. There let the pealing organ blow To the full-voiced quire below In service high and anthems clear As may with sweetness, through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heaven before mine eyes.
Sivu 257 - We have also large and various orchards and gardens, wherein we do not so much respect beauty as variety of ground and soil, proper for divers trees and herbs...
Sivu 249 - ... inheritance. I have read in a book of one of your men, of a feigned commonwealth, where the married couple are permitted, before they contract, to see one another naked. This they dislike : for they think it a scorn to give a refusal after so familiar knowledge : but because of many hidden defects in men and women's bodies, they have a more civil way : for they have near every town a couple of pools, (which they call Adam and Eve's pools,) where it is permitted to one of the friends of the man,...
Sivu iii - Our life is turned Out of her course, wherever man is made An offering, or a sacrifice, a tool Or implement, a passive thing employed ' As a brute mean, without acknowledgment Of common right or interest in the end ; Used or abused, as selfishness may prompt.
Sivu 32 - The increase of pasture,' said I, ' by which your sheep, which are naturally mild, and easily kept in order, may be said now to devour men and unpeople, not only villages, but towns ; for wherever it is found that the sheep of any soil yield a softer and richer wool than ordinary, there the nobility and gentry, and even those holy men, the abbots ! not contented with the old rents which their farms yielded, nor thinking it enough that they, living at their ease, do no good to the public, resolve...
Sivu 120 - How charming is divine philosophy ! Not harsh, and crabbed, as dull fools suppose, But musical as is Apollo's lute, And a perpetual feast of nectar'd sweets, Where no crude surfeit reigns.
Sivu 17 - As when a vulture on Imaus bred, Whose snowy ridge the roving Tartar bounds. Dislodging from a region scarce of prey To gorge the flesh of lambs or yeanling kids On hills where flocks are fed, flies...

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