The Long Argument: English Puritanism and the Shaping of New England Culture, 1570-1700

Etukansi
UNC Press Books, 1991 - 395 sivua
In this wide-ranging study Stephen Foster explores Puritanism in England and America from its roots in the Elizabethan era to the end of the seventeenth century. Focusing on Puritanism as a cultural and political phenomenon as well as a religious movement
 

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The Elizabethan Contribution The Celebration of Order 15701610
33
Continuity and Ambiguity The Gospel Doing 15901630
65
From Engagement to Flight The Failure of Politics 16101630
108
From Exodus to Revelation The Move toward Sectarianism in England and America 16301650
138
Reconstruction and Conflict The Halfway Covenant and Declension Controversies 16501680
175
Israels Fate The Definition of Establishment in Puritan America 16811700
231
The Long Argument and Its Ending
286
Editions and Pressruns before the Civil War
315
Notes
319
Index
377
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Tietoja kirjailijasta (1991)

Born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, Stephen Foster became a well-known American composer of many popular songs that are still sung and enjoyed today. As a child, Foster learned to play the flute. At the age of 18, he published his first song, "Open Thy Lattice, Love." In 1846 Foster moved to Cincinnati to work as an accountant for one of his brothers. During his career, Foster wrote 189 songs, to most of which he wrote both the words and the music. Among his most notable songs are "Old Folks at Home" (or "Swanee Ribber," as it was commonly called), "O Susanna," "My Old Kentucky Home," and "Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair." "Beautiful Dreamer" was the last song he wrote. Foster finished the composition only a few days before his death. Foster's music was greatly influenced by black minstrel shows. The gentleness of many of Foster's songs was not characteristic of his life. He was constantly in need of money, his marriage was most unhappy, and he died penniless in New York's Bellevue Hospital. Foster's fame lives on today. Hundreds of reprints of Foster's songs are available, almost all of which have "improved" arrangements.

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