English Local Government: The Story of the King's Highway, Nide 5

Etukansi
Longmans, Green and Company, 1913 - 279 sivua
 

Mitä ihmiset sanovat - Kirjoita arvostelu

Yhtään arvostelua ei löytynyt.

Sisältö


Muita painoksia - Näytä kaikki

Yleiset termit ja lausekkeet

Suositut otteet

Sivu 74 - That a route connecting two great towns, which have a large and thriving trade with each other, should be maintained at the cost of the rural population scattered between them is obviously unjust; and this injustice was peculiarly glaring in the case of the great North road, which traversed very poor and thinly inhabited districts, and joined very rich and populous districts.
Sivu 174 - Dundas, found the turnpike-gate, situate between Tooting and Streatham, thrown open. Being elevated above their usual prudence, and having no servant near them, they passed through the gate at a brisk pace, without stopping to pay the toll, regardless of the remonstrances...
Sivu 8 - And further, it is commanded that highways leading from one market town to another shall be enlarged, whereas bushes, woods, or dykes be, so that there be neither dyke, tree, nor bush whereby a man may lurk to do hurt within two hundred foot of the one side and two hundred foot on the other side of the way...
Sivu 29 - And albeit that the intent of the statute is very profitable for the reparations of the decayed places, yet the rich do so cancel their portions, and the poor so loiter in their labours, that of all the six, scarcely two good days' work are well performed and accomplished in a parish on these so necessary affairs.
Sivu 73 - The road between this place [Kensington] and London is grown so infamously bad, that we live here in the same solitude as we should do if cast on a rock in the middle of the ocean, and all the Londoners tell us there is between them and us a great impassable gulf of mud.
Sivu 192 - ... on a covering of tiny angular stones that by the pressure of travel became a compact waterproof covering. All roads so built are known as macadam roads. Charles Dickens wrote : "Our shops, our horses' legs, our boots, our hearts have all been benefited by the introduction of MacAdam.
Sivu 14 - Kent be so deep and noyous, by wearing and course of water and other occasions, that people cannot have their carriages or passages by horses, upon or by the same, but to their great pains, peril, and jeopardy.
Sivu 73 - the road between this place and London is grown so infamously bad that we live here in the same solitude as we would do if cast on a rock in the middle of the ocean ; and all the Londoners tell us that there is between them and us an impassable gulf of mud.

Kirjaluettelon tiedot