Abridgment of Mental Philosophy: Including the Three Departments of the Intellect, Sensibilities, and Will : Designed as a Text-book for Academies and High Schools

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Harper & Brothers, 1869 - 564 sivua
 

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All sensation is properly and truly in the mind 11 Sensations are not images or resemblances of objects
25
The connexion between the mental and physical change not ca pable of explanation
26
of the meaning and nature of perception 14 Perception makes us acquainted with a material world
27
Of the primary and secondary qualities of matter
28
Of the secondary qualities of matter 26 27 27 28
29
CHAPTER III
30
Nature and importance of the senses as a source of know edge 19 Connexion of the brain with sensation and perception
31
Order in which the senses are to be considered 20 Of the sense and sensations of smell
32
Of perceptions of smell in distinction from sensations
33
Of the sense and the sensations of taste 30 31 32 ib 33
34
CHAPTER IV
35
Varieties of the sensation of sound
36
Manner in which we learn the place of sounds
37
CHAPTER V
38
ib 29 Origin of the notion of extension and of form or figure
40
On the sensations of heat and cold
41
Of the sensations of hardness and softness
42
Of certain indefinite feelings sometimes ascribed to the touch
44
Relation between the sensation and what is outwardly signified to
45
CHAPTER VI
46
Statement of the mode or process in visual perception
47
Of the original and acquired perceptions of sight
48
The idea of extension not originally from sight
49
Of the knowledge of the figure of bodies by the sight
50
Illustration of the subject from the blind
51
Measurements of magnitude by the
52
Of objects seen in a mist 41 Or the sun and moon when seen in the horizon
53
Of the estimation of distances by sight
54
Signs by means of which we estimate distance by sight
55
Estimation of distance when unaided by intermediate objects
56
Of objects seen on the ocean
57
ib 54 55 56
58
Of habit in relation to the smell
59
Or habit in relation to the taste
60
Or habit in relation to the hearing
62
Application of habit to the touch
64
Other striking instances of habits of touch
65
Habits considered in relation to the sight 54 Sensations may possess a relative as well as positive increise of power
66
Loction
67
Of habits as modified by particular callings and arts
69
The law of habit considered in reference to the perceptior Jf the outlines and forms of objects
70
Notice of some facts which favour the above doctrine
71
70
72
CHAPTER VIII
73
Of conceptions of objects of sight
74
Or the influence of habit on our conceptions
76
Influence of habit on conceptions of sight 63 Of the subserviency of our conceptions to description
77
Of conceptions attended with a momentary belief
78
Conceptions which are joined with perceptions
81
Conceptions as conrected with fictitious representations 73
88
74
89
76
91
77
92
Of the nature of general abstract ideas
98
Or exercising altention in reading
104
There may also be internal accessions to knowledge
105
Instances of notions which have an internal origin
106
Other instances of ideas which have an internal origin
107
Explanation of the incoherency of dreams 1st cause
110
Pago
120
ib ORIGINAL SUGGESTION 108 Import of suggestion and its application in Reid and Stewart 109 Ideas of existence mind selfexistence and person...
127
Origin of the notion of duration 113 Mustrations of the nature of duration
128
Of time and its measurements and of eternity
129
The idea of space not of external origin
130
The idea of space has its origin in suggestion
131
PART II
133
Origin of the ideas of moral merit and demerit
134
Of other elements of knowledge developed in suggestion 122 Suggestion a source of principles as well as of ideas 129 130 131 132
135
CHAPTER III
136
Further remarks on the proper objects of consciousness
137
Consciousnes a ground or law of belief 138 126 Instances of knowledge developed in consciousness
138
CHAPTER IV
140
Of complex terms involving the relation of cause and effect
149
Connexion of relative suggestion with reasoning
150
ib 143 144 145 146 147 148 149
151
Of the general laws of association
152
Resemblance the first general law of association
153
Of resemblance in the effects produced
154
Contrast the second general or primary
155
Contiguity the third general or primary
157
Cause and effect the fourth primary
158
CHAPTER VII
166
33
171
Illustrations of philosophic memory
172
lection
175
Further directions for the improvement of the memory
179
Approval and illustrations of these views from Coleridge
185
INTELLECTUAL STATES OF INTERNAL ORIGIN
190
Definition of reasoning and of propositions
191
Of differences in the power of reasoning
197
CHAPTER XI
206
Care to be used in correctly stating the subject of discussion
212
CHAPTER XIII
219
Illustration of the subject from Milton
225
CHAPTER XIV
231
Methods of relief adopted in this case
239
Of disordered or alienated sensations
245
Illustrations of this mental disorder
251
I
259
Classification of the natural sensibilities
265
The character of emotions changes so as to comform to that
271
Section
273
Remarks on the beauty of forms The circle
279
Of sounds considered as a source of beauty
286
Explanation of the beauty of motion from Kaimes
292
Emotions of cheerfulness joy and gladness
295
The sources of associated beauty coincident with those of human
298
Of colours in connexion with the sublime
305
Of what is understood by
311
298 Emotions of dissatisfaction displeasure and disgust
316
Of the place of desires in relation to other mental states
322
CHAPTER II
328
Of the prevalence and origin of appetites for intoxicating drugs
334
Of the twofold operation and the morality of the principle of curi
340
CHAPTER V
358
Other reasons for checking and subduing the angry passions
365
CHAPTER VI
371
Illustrations of the filial affection
377
66 Of the connexion between benevolence and rectitude
383
37 Of patriotism or love of country
389
fectior
395
CHAPTER VIII
404
PART II
411
Of objects of moral approval and disapproval
418
CHAPTER III
424
Bection Page
427
CHAPTER IV
433
Of the knowledge of the Supreme Being and of the study of
447
CHAPTER II
461
Of sudden and strong impulses of the mind
467
Disordered action of the passion of fear
473
Moral accountability in cases of natural moral derangement
479
It exists in reference to what we believe to be in our power
485
Remarks of Hooker on the universality of
491
The notion which men naturally form of the Deity implies
493
Foresight of men in respect to the conduct of others
499
CHAPTER V
505
Proof of freedom from feelings of remorse
511
Both views are to be fully received
517
Illustration of the subject from the command of temper
523
IUL The soul has fountains of knowledge within
3
81
9
157

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Sivu 308 - AND I saw another mighty angel come down from heaven, clothed with a cloud : and a rainbow was upon his head, and his face was as it were the sun, and his feet as pillars of fire...
Sivu 305 - The voice of the Lord is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the Lord is upon many waters.
Sivu 103 - The crow doth sing as sweetly as the lark, When neither is attended ; and, I think The nightingale, if she should sing by day, When every goose is cackling, would be thought No better a musician than the wren.
Sivu 120 - Secondly, the other fountain from which experience furnisheth the understanding with ideas is, —the perception of the operations of our own mind within us, as it is employed about the ideas it has got; —which operations, when the soul comes to reflect on and consider, do furnish the understanding with another set of ideas, which could not be had from things without.
Sivu 491 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Sivu 242 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee : I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind; a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain?
Sivu 182 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain, Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain. Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise ! * Each stamps its image as the other flies.
Sivu 445 - Cast thy bread upon the waters, and thou shalt find it after many days.
Sivu 80 - Spit, fire! spout, rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters: I tax not you, you elements, with unkindness; I never gave you kingdom, call'd you children, You owe me no subscription: then let fall Your horrible pleasure; here I stand, your slave, A poor, infirm, weak, and despis'd old man.
Sivu 387 - The winds roared, and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him milk; no wife to grind his corn.

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