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in such oppressing circumstances, as well as his endeavours to relievo his soul, by proofs that Christ is the true Messiah, were so deeply impressed on his mind that they cannot be eradicated. Another Christian lady in the country, who dealt with him in the same way, only served to penetrate his soul more deeply.

Mr. S said to me in presence of his wife and a female neighbour, -I quote his own expressions, -" I must recognise Jesus as a high, high Prophet; but whether His divinity could be carried out through the whole Bible I do not yet know."

Mr. E —, who is very versed in the Hebrew literature, and who occasionally, as I think, conversed with some of our missionaries, but always with reluctance and open hatred to the messenger of the cross, met me very kindly lately in the streets, and seemed, on the contrary, disposed to speak about Cbristianity, although opposing it; and it seems to me by his conversation, that he reads the New Testament. He told me also that his misfortunes took a favourable turn, not by the hand of man, but by God Himself.

Notices, dr.

& We have very lively satisfaction in commending the subjoined prospectus to the sanction and cordial co-operation of our readers. Such an establishment will be of inestimable value to tutors and to students, and to all who love the Bible and take interest in its literary associations.

The Rev. David Edwards, who has the honour of originating this movement, will be happy to receive communications on the subject, and specimens for the museum, at No. 22 Hart Street, Bloomsbury.

“THE SCRIPTURAL MUSEUM.—It is proposed to establish a Gallery of Scriptural Illustration, with the view of awakening and stimulating an interest in the study of the Scriptures, and at the same time collecting materials for their elucidation, and for the confirmation of their historical accuracy. The following subjects, amongst others, will be embraced in the collection :-Landscape Scenery of Palestine; Models of Jerusalem, &c.; Productions; Illustrations of the Civil and Ecclesiastical Policy of the Hebrews; Military Discipline; Sacred Antiquities of the Israelites, Assyrians, Egyptians, &c.; Tabernacle—Temple, Proseuchæ, and Synagogues, &c. A scheme of Lectures will also be organised in connection with the above Institution."

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The account for the current year will be closed on the 31st of March; and as all sums coming to hand after that day will be carried to next year's account, the Committee therefore respectfully solicit an early remittance, and with it a list of Officers and Contributors, as it is desired that they should appear in the Report. The Committee hope that the amounts remitted will at least equal those of last year, as it is very

important that the Society should enter on its new course, not only free from debt, but free from painful apprehension.

All orders to be payable to Mr. George Yonge, at the Office; if postoffice orders, payable to him at the chief office.

The MONTHLY MEETING of Jewish and Gentile Christians, for Prayer and Scriptural Conference, will be held at the Office, 1, Crescent Place, New Bridge Street, Blackfriars, on WEDNESDAY EVENING, March 19, at Seven o'clock.—The Meeting is open to all the friends of Israel.

London : Published by JOHN SNOW, 35, Paternoster Row. Printed by Charles Frederick Adams, of 23, Middle Street, Cloth Fair, City, and William Gee, of 48, Seward Street,

st. Luke, at their Printing Office, 23, Middle Street, Cloth Fair, City.

The Jewish Herald,

,

AND

RECORD OF CHRISTIAN EFFORT FOR THE SPIRITUAL GOOD

OF GOD'S ANCIENT PEOPLE.

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PUBLISH YE, PRAISE YE, AND SAY, O LORD, SAVE THY PEOPLE, THE REMNANT

OF ISRAEL."

PUBLISHED UNDER THE SUPERINTENDENCE OF THE BRITISH SOCIETY FOR THE

PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL AMONG THE JEWS.

No. 124.]

APRIL, 1856.

[Price ld.

PAOR

PAGB

Contents.

PAOE
The Thirteenth Anniversary 49 MISSIONARY INTELLIGENCE: Obituary :-Tho late Mr.
Impressions of Palestine ......
50 Beyrout

57 Wertheimer Special Prayer for the Jews 54 France

58 Contributions received in aid Notice of Books :--The Lamps Brussels

59 of the Society.. of the Temple 56 Breslau

61 | Notices, &c.

63

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The Thirteenth Anniversary.

THE ANNUAL MEETING

OF SUBSCRIBERS AND FRIENDS WILL BE HELD (D.v.)
IN FREEMASONS' HALL, GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN'S INN FIELDS,

On Friday Evening, April 25th, at Six o'clock.

SIR CULLING E. EARDLEY, BART., IN THE CHAIR.

It is hoped that a numerous assembly of Christians, from every evalgelical communion, will on this occasion gather round our newly-elected Treasurer, that the united voice of prayer and praise may ascend to the God of Abraham-that we may anew pledge our allegiance to the cause of Israel's salvation, and rekindle the fame of love to Israel's Redeemer. Shadows of the past will overhang the spirits of some among us; but as We survey the Jewish mission-field, lighted by many a beam of mercy, and unroll the record of Jehovah's unchanging love to the people whom He hath chosen for Himself

, we shall find our confidence strengthened ; and, encouraged by many tokens of Christian sympathy, we shall look onward in the joyfulness of a hope that rests not on the wisdom or prowess of man, but on the faithfulness and lovingkindness of God. The claims of the “ remnant of Jacob” will present themselves with fresh vividness to

VOL. XI,XEW SERIES, YOL. II.

our affections while we call to mind the promise, hastening on to its accomplishment, that “the remnant of Jacob shall be in the midst of many people as a dew from the Lord, as the showers upon the grass, that tarrieth not for man, nor waiteth for the sons of men,”-pra, more:

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“ That Israel shall blossom and bud, and fill the face of the world with fruit."

THE ANNUAL SERMONS
ON BEHALF OF THE SOCIETY WILL BE PREACHED

On Wednesday Evening, April 9th,
AT TRINITY CHAPEL, JOHN STREET, EDGEWARE ROAD,

(REV. R. H. HERSCHELL's), BY THE
REV. JAMES HAMILTON, D.D.

And on Tuesday Evening, April 22nd, at the

POULTRY CHAPEL,
BY THE REV. T. W. AVELING.

THE SERVICES TO COMMENCE AT SEVEN O'CLOCK.

A MEETING FOR SPECIAL PRAYER

WILL BE HELD

IN THE SOCIETY'S ROOMS, 1, CRESCENT PLACE, BLACKFRIARS,

On Wednesday Evening, April 16th,

AT SEVEN O'CLOCK.

The Committee earnestly and respectfully entreat, also, that public prayer may be specially offered, and the spiritual condition of the Jews commended to Christian sympathy and exertion in the several places of worship on the Lord's day (April 20th) previous to the meeting. Will our kind friends, in the various localities, respectfully suggest this to ministers engaged in public services on that day? Who can tell how large a blessing may descend on Israel in answer to such prayer, and how much may be involved in this, of life to the Churches, and of mercy to the world?

Impressions of Palestine

.

(BY THE REV. T. W. AVELING.)

GETHSEMANE. A LITTLE way beyond the tomb of Absalom, close to the rocky bridge that crosses the Kedron, and at the junction of two paths, one of which ascends to the summit of the Mount of Olives, while the other winds round it to Bethany, is a square spot of ground, enclosed with high walls, with a low door in the south-east portion of it, near a bye path leading up the hill. We knocked at this door, and, after waiting a few moments, it was opened by a monk belonging to the Latin convent, who bowed his head to us, and courteously invited us to enter. We stooped under the low stone lintel, and, with beating hearts, found ourselves within Gethse

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It was toward the close of the afternoon, when we visited this hallowed spot. The sun was sinking behind the battlements of the city, which tower two hundred feet above the valley, and thus the garden began to lie in shadow. All was very still as we entered, a perfect calm brooding over earth and sky: !19 song of birds, nor murmur of bec or of flowing waters, nor hum of voices from the city, although so near at hand, broke the solemn silence that reigned around-all was hushed as the aisle of a deserted cathedral at midnight.

My companions and I almost unconsciously separated from each other; and taking different paths, by the sides of which grew roses and mignionette, we walked, and mused, and prayed alone.

How often the name of this memorable spot had thrilled through my soul, when reading the simple, yet beautiful and touching, narratives of the Evangelists; and now my feet were pressing its hallowed soil! I was almost awed by the sound of my own voice; and that of others, even in whispers, seemed to be an invasion on the sanctity of the scene. Here the Incarnate One had bowed, in the intensity of his heart's agony, and trembled beneath the awful frown of Divine justice; “ for it pleased the Lord to bruise Him” and deal with Him as a sinner, though He“ knew no șin.” Here the bitter cup, which His father had given Him to drink, had been taken by His trembling hands, and drained to the last dregs. Here a darker night than that which enshrouded garden and city, hill and sky, had fallen on His spirit, although it bowed in meek and humble acquiescence to His Father's will. Here, He experienced that utter loneliness of soul, which bowed Him down to the dust; and which was all the more keenly felt, when those He had chosen from the disciples to be with Him, in that season of overwhelming sorrow, were found to have sunk into heavy slumber near Him ;" could not watch with Him one hour.” The crisis of His earthly history had come, and heaven and earth and hell were about to behold a sight at which all should tremble; a fearful tragedy, that should transfix a gazing universe with terror and wonder.

Eight olive-trees still grow here, of very great age; but whether they are the identical ones that overshadowed Him, “the same night in which He was betrayed ;" whether these hushed the whisperings of their leaves to listen to the sad cry of woe that rose up from the depths of His breaking heart, as he lay prostrate on the earth beneath them, may admit of a doubt: but, unquestionably, several centuries have passed over them, and beneath their foliage many generations have stood; and travellers like us, from far-off lands, hare walked and wept, and knelt and prayed, as they sought to realise a sympathy with the “Man of sorrows" in the hour of His “agony and bloody sweat”—that terrible parenthesis in His otherwise happy intercourse with His Father while on earth. A long time we mused on this suggestive spot; and after having gathered a branch or two of the olives, slowly bent our steps homeward, by the very path that Christ must have taken when, in the custody of the soldiers, He passed from Gethsemane to Pilato's house. This road leads by the tomb of the Virgin, and the place where Stephen was martyred, from whom the gate of the city, close by, takes its name. As we were leaving the garden, we offered money to the monk, who was the custode of the place; but he steadily refused anything at our hands-it was the only instance of the kind we met with.

FAREWELL TO JERUSALEM. I look back upon my visit to Jerusalem with mingled sadness and pleasure. It was an honour not accorded to many, to stand within the gates of the city of God, and with the remembrances of early childhood's dreams rushing over the soul, to walk along its streets, climb its hills, plunge into its valleys, and by rock and fountain, and garden and ruin, listen to the echoes of the past, that yet lingered there. Some spake of kings who had reigned in earthly splendour, of prophets who had spoken, and of bards who had sung, of Jehovah and His wondrous ways; and, above all, some bore to my spirit's ear the tones of the voice of Him who spake as never man spake before, and whose lips, as well as words, whose whole spirit, thoughts, and deeds, formed one grand harmonious psalm of holy praise “ to the glory of God the Father.”

I thought of the varied events that had occurred at Jerusalem; of the days of its triumphs, when the first temple glowed in its beauty and freshness, in the all-embracing sunshine of Heaven without, and when the fire from Heaven lighted up the cherubim within ; and then of that hour of sorrow and woe when Nebuchadnezzar “burnt the house of God, and brake down the walls of Jerusalem, and burnt all the palaces thereof with fire, and destroyed all the goodly vessels thereof." Then came the time of return, and the re-erection of the city and temple from their ruins, when men wrought with one hand and held the sword in the other; and once again a time of captivity and desolation, when the eagles of the Romans came nigh their city, and at length were planted on its walls,

I thought of that glorious parenthesis in the history of its degradation, when Christ appeared,—the King of Zion, who came "in the name of the Lord;" when the mountains and hills brake forth into singing, to hail the Anointed of the Most High, whose miracles of mercy and words of love told of an opened Heaven and a pardoning God; and then of that dark tragedy with which Israel sealed his own doom, that awful climax of the people's guilt, when the cup became full, and the fountains of Divine wrath were all unsealed, and the arrows of vengeance were made ready for the string. Then, of its being once more encompassed with armies; when its enemies dug trenches and reared forts, and the famine destroyed it, and the siege wasted, and the fire consumed, and the angels, that dwelt within the sanctuary, said one to another, mournfully, “Let us depart.” Then the final overthrow, the razing of its strongholds to their very foundations; and the long, long series of years during which the city has been trodden down of the Gentiles,-at one time the object of the vengeance of the Moslem, at another no less harassed and injured by the Christian.

It yet bears, in its modern Arabic name, El Khuds“ The Holy," the memory of its former glory and greatness, which Mohammedans, as well as Christians and Jews, recognise.

But with professed friend or foe within its walls ever may the virgin of Judea be seen, sitting beneath her solitary palm-tree, weeping day and night for the slain of the daughter of her people, and nursing in silence her bitter and hopeless woe.

It was with deep emotions I first saw Jerusalem; it was with silent awe I passed along its streets, for many days, as if in a deeply interesting and solemn dream; and it was with mingled feelings I left its hallowed walls, around which clustered a thousand recollections, that made me at

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