Sivut kuvina
PDF
ePub

Anait
re!

GL Stans
6-6-61

iii

[ocr errors][merged small]

In view of the creation of a Dominions Office (see page viii), the title of the publication was in 1926 altered to “The Dominions Office and Colonial Office List.”

was

[ocr errors]

as

In 1927 Part II. rearranged

to collect together the accounts of the territories with which each Office is concerned.

The present Edition has been carefully revised thoughout, and the Editors desire to express their thanks for the ready co-operation and assistance which the Dominion and Colonial Governments and their colleagues in the two Offices have accorded to them. They will be glad to receive information of any errors or omissions which may be discovered, and to have notified to them any alterations or additions to be made in the biographical portion of

work. All communications should be addressed to The Editors, Dominions Office and Colonial Office List, Colonial Office, Downing Street, London, S.W.1.”

the

The Editors are greatly obliged to the different Dominion and Colonial Governments for the assistance afforded to them in regard to maps. It must, however, be distinctly understood that the maps in this publication are supplied for the purpose of illustrating the Handbook, and (like the book itself) not official.

are

Special efforts have continued to be made to increase in number and bring up to date the biographies in the Appendix, and the Editors wish to express their acknowledgments to the Governments and Officers who have supplied them with information on the point. They are specially indebted to the Under-Secretary of State of Canada and to the Government of the Union of South Africa,

DOWNING STREET,

FEBRUARY, 1939.

[graphic]

CRUSHERS

for Mines and for the production of all grades of stone for Roads, Dams, Bridges and other Public works

JAW BREAKERS
DISC CRUSHERS

all types manufactured including

ROLL CRUSHERS GYRATORY CRUSHERS
GRANULATORS COAL BREAKERS

[graphic][ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors][subsumed][subsumed][merged small]

MINING REQUISITES

of every description including “ERA” MANGANESE STEEL WEARING PARTS FOR ALL TYPES OF CRUSHERS SHOES, DIES, CAMSHAFTS, STEEL BALLS, GRIZZLEY BARS, WHEELS & AXLES HOLLOW AND SOLID MINING DRILL STEEL

[graphic]

DREDGER COMPONENTS

FOR GOLD, TIN and other
DREDGING OPERATIONS

The adjoining illustration shows a “HECLA" PATENT DREDGER BUCKET

fitted with RENEWABLE RIVETLESS LIP

(Patent No. 463556)
SPARES include
TUMBLERS, BUCKETS, LADDER ROLLERS, HADFIELDS L" SHEFFIELD.
PINS, BUSHES, GEARING, etc.

HADFIELDS LTD

TD EAST HECLA & HECLA WORKS

SHEFFIELD

No. 2135

THE COLONIAL OFFICE.

[ocr errors]

The first separate organisation in this country for the central administration of Colonial affairs was a Committee of the Privy Council appointed by Order in Council of 4th July, 1660, " for the Plantaçons.” On the 1st December, 1660, a separate “ Council of Foreign Plantations ” was created by Letters Patent.

It may be interesting to state that on the 28th of February, 1671, Evelyn's Diary records the author's appointment as a member of this Council, with " salary of £500 per annum to encourage me.

In September, 1672, the Council was united, by Letters Patent, to the Council for Trade, and was henceforward known as the “ Council of Trade and Plantations." It was suppressed on 21st December, 1677, and its functions, which had been much neglected, were transferred to the Privy Council. It was re-constituted in 1695, and continued to exist until 1782, at which date it consisted of eight Members of Parliament, who received a salary of £1,000 per annum each.

The affairs of India were placed under its charge in 1748, and remained so until the establishment of the Board of Control in 1784. From 1768 Colonial affairs have been dealt with by a Secretary of State.

The office of Secretary to the Sovereign dates at least from the reign of Henry III. There was one principal Secretary only (who was already called Secretary of State) down to 1539, when a second was appointed. From 1708 to 1746 a third Secretaryship existed dealing exclusively with Scotland.

In 1768, a Secretary of State for the American, or Colonial Department, was appointed, in addition to the two principal Secretaries of State then existing; but the commissions to the Council of Trade and Plantations continued to run as before. Both the Council and the New Secretary of State’s Department were abolished in 1782 by Burke's Act, 22 Geo. III., cap. 82, on the loss of the United States.

By this Act power was given to delegate to a Committee of the Privy Council all the functions hitherto exercised by the Council of Trade and Plantations, and by Order in Council of 11th September, 1782, circular instructions were sent to the Governors of the Plantations to transmit their returns and accounts to the Privy Council. Pending the appointment of a Committee, Colonial affairs were dealt with by a subordinate branch of the Home Department, styled the Plantations Branch.

At this time the duties of the two principal Secretaries of State were divided into “Home” and “Foreign,” the affairs of Ireland devolving on the Home Department, which now undertook also those of the Colonies.

In 1784, by Order in Council of 5th March, a “ Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations " was appointed in pursuance of Burke's Act, and the new body was reorganised and placed upon a definite footing by the subsequent Orders of 22nd August and 25th August, 1786. The business hitherto dealt with by the Plantations Branch of the Home Office was transferred to this Committee.

At its commencement in 1793, the affairs of the French War were managed by the Home Department, but in 1794 Mr. Dundas (afterwards Lord Melville), who was then the Secretary of State dealing with the Home affairs of the Department, was appointed "Secretary for War,"and also nominally Secretary of State for the Colonies; but the Departments of War and the Colonies were not actually united until 1801, when Lord Hobart was created Secretary of State for the War and Colonial Department. From 1794 the “Committee for Trade and Foreign Plantations "(now known as the Board of Trade) gradually ceased to have any connection with Colonial affairs.

From the conclusion of the French War the attention of the Secretary of State was chiefly occupied with the Colonies, and he was usually designated as Secretary

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
« EdellinenJatka »