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INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL CITIES.

BALTIMORE.

The leading branches of commerce at Baltimore, for some years, have been flour, grain, tobacco, guano, copper and coffee. From the eleventh annual report of the Baltimore Board of Trade, for the year 1860, we extract the following details :

VALUE OF FOREIGN IMPORTS AND EXPORTS AT TIE DISTRICT OF BALTIMORE FOR THE

LAST FOURTEEN YEARS.

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In the year

The inspections of flour have decreased of late years. 1852 they were 1,307,166 bbls., and in the year 1853 1,183,704 bbls. The export to Brazil was formerly much larger than it is now.

Flour INSPECTIONS IN BALTIMORE FOR THE LAST FIVE YEARS.

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COMPARATIVE RECEIPTS OF GRAIN for Four YEARS.

DESCRIPTIONS.

Wheat,.. Corn,. Oats, Rye, Peas, Beans,

1857.
bushels.
3,103,498
4,183,854
1,200,000
160,000

3,000
2,000

1858.
bushels.
2,716,731
4,046,745
1,115,194
108,378

7,000
1,000

1859.
bushels.
3,064,000
3,620,900

950,476
140,970

6,400
3,260

1860. bushels. 2,839,977 3,044,361 1,086,750 101,971 10,000 2,500

Total.....

8,652,352

7,995,048

7,786,000

7,085,559

• •

1841,.

1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, 1846,.. 1847, 1848,

FLOUR INSPECTIONS AT BALTIMORE, SINCE 1841.

bbls. 628,974

1849,. 658,282

1850, 560,431 1851, 499,501 1852, 576,745 1853, 850,116 1854,. 959,456 1855,. 736,441 1856,

bble. 764,519 896,592

912, 498 1,307,166 1,183,704

837,195 957,739 940,314

Tobacco.—The largest export of tobacco from the port of Baltimore, since 1841, was in the year 1860, viz., 67,142 hhds. The following shows the annual export from Baltimore, and from all ports of the United States, from 1841 to 1847 :*

From
From

From
Baltimore. other porta.

United States. Total value.
hhds.
hhds.

hhds. 1841,.

35,482
112,346

147,828 $ 12,576,703 1842,

43,763
114,947
158,710

9,540,755 1843,

42,324
52,130
94,454

4,650,979 1844,

44,910
118,132
163,042

8,397,255 1845,

65,910
81,258
147,168

7,469,819 1846,

51,386
96,612
147,998

8,478,270 1847,

53,344
82,418
135,762

7,242,086 Tobacco INSPECTIONS AT BALTIMORE FOR THE LAST TWELVE YEARS. Kentucky

STOCKS. Years. Maryland. Ohio. and other Total hhds.

kind 8.

Baltimore. N. Orl'ne. 1860,

51,000 23,000 3,100 77,503 24,436 13,814 1859,

44,480 15,331 3,022 62,801 14,073 19,111 1858, 45,200 22,300 3,169

70,669 8,354 20,167 1857,

38,057 7,640 1,608 47,305 4,219 5,078 1856,

38,330 12,959 1,563 52,852 4,584 10,212 1855, 28,470 10,097

991

39,558 7,439 5,034 1854, 26,048 10,362 2,560 38,970

3,733

6,577 1853, 29,248 17,947 1,472 48,667

9,779

28,250 1852,

29,569 17,720 1,043 48,332 11,759 23,510 1851, 25,013 16,798

931 42,742 17,699 9,099 1850, 27,085 13,965

783 41,833 10,617 11.050 1849,

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30,689 13,664 1,248 45,601 19,628 5,428

Total,..... 413,189 . 181,783 . 21,490 616,833 · 136,320 , 167,330

Average,.. 34,432 15,148 1,790 51,400 11,360 13,944 EXPORTS OF TOBACCO FROM THE PORT OF BALTIMORE FOR THE LAST THIRTEEN YEAEs.

All other Total Years.

Bremen. Rotterdam. Amsterdam. France. places. hhde. 1860,

24,700 22,700 5,244 6,825 7,677 67,142 1859,

19,180 21,735 1,253 8,311 5,495 55,974 1858,

16,542 18,059 3,825 16,935 11,173 66,534 1857,

18,034 11,711 4,054 7,438 6,325 47,562 1856,

20,612 14,215 7,779 4,891 8,301 55,798 1855,. 9,103 7,510

10 7,527 1,144 36,392 1854,

18,016 7,407 6,583 10,180 4,006 45,192 1853,

18,947 10,395 9,980 5,380 5,986 50,688 1852,

22,860 11,473 5,067 7,679 7,734 54,813 1851,

12,654 9,694 4,154 2,327 5,292 34,124 1850, 15,864 7,815

5,973 8,177 6,940 44,368 1849,

18,821 13,783 8,725 9,562 1,033 51,924 1848, 12,787 7,910 3,103 5,761

131 38,890

See MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE, July, 1861, p. 58.

PRICES OF MARYLAND, OHIO AND KENTUCKY TOBACCO ON THE 15TH OF JANUARY, AND

ABOUT THE SAME TIME EACH ALTERNATE MONTH, 1860.

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IMPORTS OF GUANO AT BALTIMORE FOR THE LAST TWELVE YEARS.
Tons.

Tone. 1849, Peruvian,. 2,700 1855, all kinds,.

43,930 1850, 6,800 1856,

38,706 1851, 25,000 1857,

28,625 1852, 25,500 | 1858,

28.143 1853, 32,152 1859,

63,206 1854, all kinds, 58,927 | 1860,

71,614 Guano. The importations at Baltimore the past year have been as follows : of Peruvian, 56,584 tons, (including 2,450 tons coastwise ;) Mexican, 5,150 tons; Sombrero, 4,156 tons; Nevassa, 3,830 tons; Jarvis Island, 450 tons ; Baker's Island, 830 tons; Elide Island, 390 tons; African, 110 tons; Johnson's Island, 114 tons—in all 71,614 tons, against 63,206 tons in 1859, being the largest supply ever before received at this port. The demand for all descriptions have been good, and prices have ruled steady during the year. During the past month the arrivals of Peruvian have been quite free, and the stock at the close in warehouses is estimated at 18,000 @ 20,000 tons, being double the quantity on hand same time last year.

There is, however, no prospect of any reduction in the price. The recent contracts with the Peruvian government require enormous advances from the contractors. The consumption in Europe is much greater than in this country, and there is a treaty stipulation with England which prohibits a reduction in prices in this country without a corresponding reduction in Europe. It continues to be a well-established fact, that the deposits of guano in the Chincha Islands are inexhaustible, so far as the present generation is concerned. The monopoly is complete, for there is no other guano, except in very limited quantities. The origin of all guano is the same, but this is the only deposit where there is a total absence of rain. At all other localities, the ammonia being soluble, is washed out by rain. Guano continues to be imported from Jarvis and Baker's Islands, in the Pacific. It is only valuable for its phosphates, and is subject to the cost of high freights. Mexican and Sombrero continue to arrive. The Ichobold from Africa, the West India, the Elide, California and the Columbian have been quite exhausted. The total value of guano at importers' prices the past year is estimated at $3,700,000.

Copper.—The two smelting establishments have been in full operation the past year, producing over 10,000,000 lbs. of ingot copper, that takes the preference in the market, and, of course, is eagerly bought as fast as made. Baltimore is better situated for smelting copper ores than any other place in the country, as there is no coal equal to the Cumberland for it. Ingot copper has ruled very steady the whole year at 214 @ 23 cents per pound. The quantity exported to foreign ports direct amount to 547,500 lbs., principally to Bremen and Holland.

Iron.—As a general remark, the state of the iron trade for the year has been satisfactory, without any great fluctuations. The demand has been equal to the supply, and most of the furnaces and rolling-mills have had constant employment, although the profits have been small; but by economy and good management (which, after all, is the secret of the success of all branches of manufacturing) it has been sufficiently remunerative to encourage an outlay for an increased business for 1861. The proprietors of one of the large rolling-mills are making arrangements to nearly double the production of their celebrated boiler iron. IMPORTS OF COFFEE AT BALTIMORE FROM Brazil, FOR THE PAST SEVENTEEN YEARS.

Year. 1844, 1845, 1846, 1847, 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851, 1852, 1853,

Bags. . Year.
122,837 1854,
104,316 1855,
162,832 1856,
115,261 1857,
204,485 1858,
186,173 1859,
144,492 1860,
256,142
224,080 Total,....
185,980 Average,

Bage. 200.829 249,060 197,989 203,560 188,019 230,984 181,292

3,153,337

185,190

Coal.-During the past year the aggregate receipts foot up 722,813 tons of all kinds, being an increase of 120,000 tons compared with last year, and equally divided between the bituminous and anthracite. The dealers engaged in this branch of business very generally complain of the high rates of freight imposed by the Baltimore and Ohio Rail-Road, and lead us to infer that with lower rates a largely increased business would be the result.

All the bituminous coal received was brought here via the Baltimore and Ohio Rail-Road, but of the anthracite coal brought to our market, 173,850 tons were received via the Northern Central Railway, and 151,279 tons via the Susquehanna and Tide-Water Canal. Bituminous coal has sold through the year with but little variation at $3 15 for fine, $3 50 for run of mine, and $4 25 per ton for lump, delivered on board at Locust Point; but for anthracite coal prices have ranged at from $4 25 up to $5 25 per ton, the former being the lowest, and the latter the highest price for it during the year.

RECEIPTS OF CUMBERLAND COAL AT BALTIMORE IN 1859 AND 1860.
1859.
1860.

1859.
January,
20,204 14,404 July,...

30,792 February, 16,136 16,569 August,..

34,993 March,..

21,468 31,384 September, 30,989 April,.. 23,563 36,607 October,

36,340 May, 40,464 47,367 November,.

33,962 June, 35,096 37,202 December,

24,814

1860. 43,659 44,291 30,935 38,444 29,932 26,890

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RECEIPTS OF COAL AT BALTIMORE FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS, to 31st DECEMBER. Bituminous. Anthracite.

Bituminous. Anthracite. 1851,.. 163,855 200,000 1856,

446,981 266,661 1852, 256,000 125,000 1857,

444,603 243,482 1853, 406,183 183,000 1858,.

318,607 256,105 1854, 451,070 238,740 1859,..

351,821 268,189 1855,. 389,741 .. 265,921 1860,..

397,684 325,129

Oysters.--The oyster-packing business of Baltimore is still fully maintained. There are now engaged in its prosecution about thirty houses, employing a large number of persons of both sexes, in the different departments of shucking, packing, &c. The quantity of oysters used by the trade during a season, viz., from September 1st to June 15th, is about 3,000,000 bushels, averaging 10,000 bushels per day. The latter part of last season was very brisk, but this fall the trade has, in common with all other branches, suffered from the political panic. About twothirds of the oysters taken by the packers are put up in a raw state in ice, and sent to all the cities in the West. The balance is put up sealed, and also sent in the same direction--St. Louis being the principal point for distributing to the extreme West. The shipments to California and foreign ports is not so great as formerly. There are employed in bringing oysters to this port several hundred vessels, carrying an average of 700 bushels each, with a crew of four persons to each vessel. There are about 2,000 persons of both sexes engaged in shucking, packing, &c., the larger proportion of whom are negroes. There are also about 200 persons employed in soldering the cans, making boxes and packing in ice ready for shipment. Another department of this business is the manufacture of cans, which employs some 200 tinners, at an annual cost of $400,000. We also notice the receipt of 200,000 bushels, of which 30,000 bushels are brought by the Norfolk and other steamers, for city consumption, and averaging 50 cents per bushel. The principal items of the trade we recapitulate as follows: Number of packing houses,. .......30 Vessels employed,

....500 Bushels packed... .3,000,000 Persons employed,

.3,000 ('ost, at 35 cts. per bushel,....$1,050,000 | Total value of trade, $1,800,000

The officers of the Baltimore Board of Trade, elected October 1st, 1860, are as follows :-President, John C. BRUNE; Vice-Presidents, A. SCHUMACHER, Thomas C. JENKINS, William McKim, Robert LESLIE; Treasurer, E. B. Dallam; Secretary, GEORGE U. PORTER,

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