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manner he here points out Arius, a false teacher in the Christian Church.

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The Sounding of the Second Trumpet. Apoc. Chap. VIII. v. 8.' “ And the second angel founded the trumpet, and as it were a great mountain, burning with fire, was cast into the sea, and the third part of the sea became blood.

v.9. “And the third part of thofe creatures died which had life in the sea, and the third part of the ships were destroyed.”

In the seal we faw the inteftine convulsions and : violences occasioned by the Arian disputes ; here we

find described by an expressive allegory, the spiritual mischief done by that same heresy. And thus the second seal and second trumpet announce to us distinctly and separately the two dismal effects, temporal and spiritual of Arianism. A great mountain burning with fire, or a great heresy, tending to kin

among Christians the fire of discord in their principles of faith, and the flame of mutual animosity, is caft into the sea, that is, is published in the Church, which it embroils, and which therefore is now represented as a troubled sea.

And the third part of the sea becomes blood, by which change its 'waters become poisonous to the fish that live in them : 'and in like manner the Catholic doctrine, on which the faithful live, is corrupted by Arianism through a third part of the Church, and becomes poisonous and destructive. The confequence of which is, the third part of those creatures die,' which have life in the fea, or the third part nearly of the Christians drink the heretical poison, and die a spiritual death. And even the third part of the ships were destroyed, that is, a third part of the particular churches intire with their pastors, meant here by the ships, imbibe the same poison and perish.

The natural consequences of heresy are, disputes and contentions in the Church; and therefore we find ascribed to it voices of noises. Apoc. viii.

5. fee

Po 28.

The Pouring out of the second Vial of the Wrath of God.

Apoc. Chap. XVI. v. 3. “And the second angel, fays St. John,“ poured out his vial upon the sea, and there came blood as it were of a dead man: and every living foul died in the sea.”

As at the founding of the second trumpet, a fiery mountain was thrown into the sea, or among the Christians; so here the second vial of God's wrath is also poured out upon the fea, or on the corrupted and guilty part of the Christians, namely, the Arian heretics. And there came blood as it were of a dead man: On pouring out the vial follows the divine judgment. There

There appears blood like that of a dead man, or blood, which after having flowed with a free and vigorous circulation during the time of health, gradually retards; its motion in a dying man, is to. tally loft and stopped when the man is dead.' Thus the Arians, after having fubsisted for a while in a vigorous condition and powerful state, are condemn. ed by a just judgment to decline, dwindle, and die Arians were in course of time, either destroyed or away. Hence, every living foul died in the lea ; the converted to the Catholic faith, and the herely extinguished. Such was their cafe. The preceding Explication illustrated by a short Account of

the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Arianism. By the accession of Conftantine to the imperial throne, idolatry received a deadly blow, and the Chriftian religion was eftablished and peaceably practifed throughout the whole Roman empire from the year 313. The bleffing of fo happy ai condition was more than could be expected by the Christians to laft long, fince Christ had fixed that his disciples should follow him, not by a life of eafe and prosperity, but through the thorny road of tribulation. Their pre

fent situation was too flattering, not to raise the envy of their ever-watchful and implacable enemy the devil. “ He,". to use the words of St. Cyprian, “ seeing his idols fallen into disrepute, and his temples deserted, on account of the number of converts to Christianity, invented a new artifice, to deceive the unwary under the disguise of the Chriftian name itself: this was heresy and fchifm, which he em ployed as his inftruments to subvert faith, corrupt truth, and diffolve unity. Those that he could not keep in the old dark road of idolatry, he deceived by leading them into the by-path of error.Lib. de. Unit. Eccl. Arius, a turbulent ambitious priest of Alexandria in Egypt, aspired to that fee; but find ing himself disappointed by the election of St. Alex ander, his jealousy and resentment stimulated him to decry the doctrine of this holy prelate, which was true and orthodox, and to oppose to it a new system of doctrine of his own invention. He began to teach that Chrift was not God, but a created be. ing, formed indeed before all other creatures, but not from eternity. Arius had a graceful mein, and a modeft deportment: He was old, and had a mortified countenance: these qualities gave himn credit, and contributed to gain him profelytes.

The holy bishop, Alexander, at first endeavoured to reelaim him by mild remonftrances and entreaties: but these not availing, and his pernicious doctrine gaining ground, Alexander assembled a synod of the bishops of Egypt and Lybia, in which Arius and his abettors were condemned and cut off from the communion of the faithful, in the year 320. Of this proceeding St. Alexander gave account by a circular letter to all the bishops of the Church. Arius fed from Alexandria into Palestine ;. there he procured protection from some bishops : from thence he proceeded to Nicomedia, where he met with a favourable reception from its bishop, Eusebius, who befind ascribed to it voices of noises. Apoc. viii, 5. fee

po 28.

The Pouring out of the second Vial of the Wrath of God.

Apoc. Chap. XVI. v. 3. “And the second angel, fays St. John,“ poured out his vial upon the sea, and there came blood as it were of a dead man: and every living foul died in the sea.”

As at the founding of the second trumpet, a fiery mountain was thrown into the sea, or among the Christians; so here the second vial of God's wrath is also poured out upon the fea, or on the corrupted and guilty part of the Christians, namely, the Arian heretics. And there came blood as it were of a dead man: On pouring out the vial follows the divine judgment. There appears blood like that of a dead man, or blood, which after having flowed with a free and vigorous circulation during the time of health, gradually retards its motion in a dying man, is totally loft and stopped when the man is dead. Thus the Arians, after having fubfifted for a while in a vigorous condition and powerful state, are condemn. ed by a just judgment to decline, dwindle, and die away. Hence, every living soul died in the sea ; the Arians were, in course of time, either destroyed or converted to the Catholic faith, and the herely extinguished. Such was their cafe. The preceding Explication illustrated by a short Account of

the Rise, Progress, and Decline of Arianism. By the accession of Constantine to the imperial throne, idolatry received a deadly blow, and the Chriftian religion was eftablished and peaceably practifed throughout the whole Roman empire from the year 313. The bleffing of fo happy a condition was more than could be expected by the Christians to laft long, since Christ had fixed that his disciples should follow him, not by a life of eafe and profperity, but through the thorny road of tribulation. Their pre

sent situation was too flattering, not to raise the envy of their ever-watchful and implacable enemy the devil. “ He,"! to use the words of St. Cyprian,

seeing his idols fallen into disrepute, and his temples deserted, on account of the number of converts to Christianity, invented a new artifice, to deceive the unwary under the disguise of the Chriftian name itself: this was heresy and fchifm, which he employed as his instruments to subvert faith, corrupt truth, and diffolve unity.. Those that he could not keep in the old dark road of idolatry, he deceived by leading them into the by-path of error.” Lib. de Unit. Eccl. Arius, a turbulent ambitious priest of Alexandria in Egypt, aspired to that see; but find ing himself disappointed by the election of St. Alexander, his jealousy and resentment stimulated him to decry the doctrine of this holy prelate, which was true and orthodox, and to oppose to it a new fyftem of doctrine of his own invention. He began to teach that Christ was not God, but a created be. ing, formed indeed before all other creatures, but not from eternity. Arius had a graceful mein, and a modeft deportment: He was old, and had a mortified countenance: these qualities gave him credit, and contributed to gain him proselytes.

The holy bishop, Alexander, at first endeavoured to reelaim him by mild remonftrances and entreaties: but these not availing, and his pernicious doctrine gaining ground, Alexander assembled a synod of the bishops of Egypt and Lybia, in which Arius and his abettors were condemned and cut off from the communion of the faithful, in the year 320. Of this proceeding St. Alexander gave account by a circular letter to all the bishops of the Church. Arius Aled from Alexandria into Palestine; there he procured protection from some bishops : from thence he proceeded to Nicomedia, where he met with a favourable reception from its bishop, Eusebius, who' be

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