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"bomen, the entire number would teen regiments, which were to be 88] ANNUAL REGISTER, 1826. 9,000 men voted in the preceding not too large, but was less than year, they had expressly disclaimed could be well deemed adequate to the idea of the increase being ren- perform the services required of it. dered necessary by any thing in the The men composing the dépôts internal state of Englandor Ireland. were not available, inasmuch as He had then stated, as he now re- they were chiefly either employed peated, that it was only in relation in the recruiting service, or conto the colonies that the existing sisted of invalided men. Although, force was reckoned inadequate; therefore, our home force was apthat the diminution of the military parently large ; yet, after the deforce in 1822 had been by far too duction of these 11,000 men, it extensive ; that, after a trial of was trifling in comparison with three years, that experiment had the clamour raised about the excompletely failed, and that a greater istence of a standing army in times number of troops was absolutely of peace. The number of regió necessary. The same necessity ments abroad was fifty-one: it was still existed: in fact, the number usual to release, every ten years, of troops in the Canadas and West each regiment on foreign service; Indies did not much exceed the and, surely no person could think number stationed there in 1792; ten years too short a period for while the increase of their popu- their continuance out of this counlation, and other considerations, try, due regard being paid to the rendered a greater military esta- health and comforts of the men. blishment indispensable. Whether If, then, these regiments were to or not the army was too numerous, be removed every tenth year, it was best ascertained by observing followed that there must be a dishow it was distributed. We had posable force for the purpose of at present, on foot, eighty-three supplying the places of the troops regiments of the line; of these, brought home from time to time. nine were stationed in Great Bri- Taking the force thus employed tain, twenty-three in Ireland, and for reliefs to be seven regiments, the others are constantly employed it followed that fourteen regiments on foreign service. Besides these were to be considered as neither ninė regiments, there were also at home nor abroad, inasmuch as in Great Britain the dépôts of the they were constantly on their fifty-oneregimentsstationed abroad. passage, or preparing for it. DeTaking each of these dépôts at ducting the dépôts of these four

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11,424. And taking the nine deemed totally unavailable, conregiments to contain 740 men tinuing in Great Britain,' the each, they would amount to 6,660. strength of the whole fourteen There weré, besides, six battalions might be set down as equal to five of foot' guards, 4,400 men, and regiments; and considering that the stafit corps 300; making a this loss fell solely on the home total of somewhat above 22,700. force, the conclusion was, that If the" 11,424 men composing the there remain continually in this dépôts, and who were, for any country only four regiments of the active purpose, really non-effective, line. The reason for setting down were deducted from the whole, the fourteen regiments as not exthe actual number was not only ceeding the full strength of five,

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was, that they always left behind rive from the English ambassador them in this country about 224 giving an entertainment to two men each; and, certainly, four re- thousand Parisians. He regretted giments composing the only effect that advantage had not been taken ive portion of the, 22,700 men of the liberal determination of the whom we retain at home, could duke of Northumberland to defray, not be deemed more than suffi- out of his private fortune, the excient to meet the emergencies of penses of his mission at the coroa the country.

nation of the king of France, and The House having divided, the thạt 10,0001. should have been numbers were, for the original spent in presenting him with a motion 106; for Mr. Hobhouse's sword in return. He denounced amendment 34.

the extravagance of keeping the Another attempt was still made great seal, &c. in silver boxes at by Mr. Hume to check what he Antigua and Dominica, in buying termed the career of reckless ex- plate for ambassadors in Lisbon, penditure, by cutting down the Madrid, or Paris, and in mainestimates for the civil contingen- taining kettle-drummers, trumpetcies, and, above all, the expenses ers, and silver trumpets, for the of our diplomatic establishments bands attached to the royal housein foreign countries. The whole hold. He was grieved to observe. cost, he said, of ambassadors and that, in regard to the latter, the consuls · for the present year, lace and finery of the dress were amounted to half a million, and not only expensive, but did not was regularly increasing. The accord with the plainness and simonly effect of large salaries was, plicity of the English character. he said, to raise men above their He preferred the plain Windsor business, and disincline, or disable, frock; and he saw, .in all this them from doing their duty; and riot, the ruinous waste and extraif a yote were to be passed re vagance

of the court of Louis XIV. ducing the salaries one half, the Mr. Croker reminded him that the duty would be quite as well per- dresses of these important personformed. He complained of the ages, however little entitled to extravagant scale of expenditure appear beside the Windsor frock, for the missions and consulates in were so far from being an innovaSouth America, which exceeded tion of modern fashion and extra100,000l., and of the folly of pay- vagance, that they were exactly ing three or four thousand a-year what they had been in the reign of to support ministers at such courts Henry VIII., as he might learn as those of Wirtemberg, Tuscany, by consulting the pictures of that and Saxony, which possessed no period. political importance. Heinveighed, Mr. Canning was surprised, bein particular, against the expenses yond all intelligible expression of of the embassy to Paris, amounting surprise, at the proposition of Mr. this year to 30,000l. ; thus exceed- Hume to withdraw our representing the cost of maintaining the atives from the smaller continental president, vice-president, and whole courts, on the ground of these civil establishment of North Ame- courts being of no political, imrica: and he could not conceive what portance. The expense of these advantage this country could de- embassies had in fact been reduced;

but the reduction had not proceeded The burthens, to which the trade from any so ungenerous, and im- of the country had been subject in provident view. Such a proposition the shape of fees to consuls, was wasin truth a declaration admitting between 65,000l. and 70,0001. ; that threeor four of the largercourts and the House had determined no were to dispose of the interests of longer to take this sum from the the smaller ones, and that in these pockets of individual merchants, latter it was searcely worth while trading to ports where British conto maintain those representatives suls were stationed, but to throw of the British Crown, whose pre- the charge upon the public genesence, however, was really of so rally. On the old system, 61,000l. much moment to their welfare. were annually paid by government, It never could be the policy of and the various companies; wherethis country, at any period, so to as, under the new arrangement, discountenance those minor states, the yearly charges for these conas to aid in preventing them from suls were not more than 50,0001., raising their heads, on occasion, and 11,000l. to the Levant consuls. among the other European go- He looked upon the total allowvernments. He by no means pre ance for such services, however, as tended to say that he was in a being 79,000l. ; from which decondition to predict the time or ducting 30,000l. voted in the civil the states which would one day list, there remained only 49,0001., exemplify the better policy of our to be voted as consuls' salaries. not neglecting them: but the This was the amount called for ; House must feel convinced, that but the relief given by it to the the period might very possibly merchants was 61,000l. In rearrive, some day or other, when gard to the consulates in the new these now minor states might rise states of South America, it was into and manifest themselves as impossible already to lay down a states of much greater power and fixed scale, or adopt a precise estiimportance.

mate. This year there had been The objections to the consular a saving to a considerable extent ; estimates appeared to him equally but it was impossible to say what extraordinary; as the plan, which the expenses for the year might be, gave occasion to them, instead of for no European mission furnished being a measure of the govern- any standard by which to compare ment, was a child begotten by Mr. them. It was most difficult to Hume himself. It had been de- form any trust-worthy scale of the termined by parliament to do away cost of such establishments in states with the whole consular system, where the prices of particular comand place it on a new footing; to modities were very unequal, and abolish all fees, and substitute fixed most of them in nearly an inverse salaries in their place. This was ratio from those of Europe-where the plan adopted, to which he had a man, for instance, might buy a been no party ; and it was rather horse for a dollar, but would be hard in Mr. Hume now to turn obliged to pay about two guineas round upon him for endeavouring for shoeing him. In the expenses, to give effect to a system, in the again, of the old diplomatic estabintroduction of which he himself lishments, the scale voted by parhad been so potent an instrument. liament in 1816, had been uni

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formly adhered to: and, although of renewing the furniture, amounted the total cost of the embassy at to between 23,000l. and 24,0001. Parisamounted this year to 30,0001., This was too much : but to make it was fallacious to assume this as the house, at least in the French the average of its annual

expense, sense of the word, weather-tight, because the increase which appeared Mr. Wyatt had been restrained by this year was but temporary, and orders from home, to an expendidependent entirely on specific ture of 12,000l. instead of 17,0001.

The hotel of our embassy on the building; and to about one in Paris was our own property ; half of his estimate for the renewal and we were the only power, ex of the furniture. The whole of cepting Russia, which possessed an these expenses, therefore, which hotel: to have parted with it would went to swell the item of the prehave been both inconvenient and sent year, did not fall to be consiimpolitic: for, although it was per- dered as lasting and regular elefectly true that Great Britain was ments in the annual average of the under no necessity of resorting to embassy ; and, in respect to the any secondary means for sustaining general expenses of the embassy, that influence in European politics he could state, on the most unto which her grandeur, her power, questionable authority, that lord and her policy, so indisputably and Granville, the ambassador, actually absolutely entitled her, yet, consi- expended yearly, at least double dering that but one other power the amount of the salary, out of possessed an hotel in Paris of this his private fortune. sort (and, of all capitals, it was Mr. Baring regretted the adoption most important for us to possess of the new principle upon which such a house in Paris), and con- government now appointed consuls, sidering that that other power was prohibiting them from engaging in Russia, he could not help feeling trade, and allowing them fixed that it was quite necessary the salaries for discharging the specific British ambassador should be thus duties assigned to them. He preaccommodated. But the hotel ferred the old system of such apwent into disrepair: five or six pointments, by which the principal years ago large annual sums had merchant of a trading port, such begun to be necessarily expended as Amsterdam in Holland, was the in requisite repairs and improve- consul. Such an individual was ments, and, in 1824, 5,0001. had surely much better qualified to been voted for these purposes. It sustain the state and hospitality was thought better to put it at necessary to be maintained among once into a good condition ; and a those with whom consuls were professional person, Mr. Wyatt, frequently associating, than a conhad been sent over to report to the sul, not a merchant, with a salary Treasury what was necessary to of perhaps not more than 6001. a be done. His estimate of the re year. quisite repairs, and of the expense

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but the reduction had not proceeded The burthens, to which the trade from any so ungenerous, and im- of the country had been subject in provident view. Such a proposition the shape of fees to consuls, was was in truth a declaration admitting between 65,000l. and 70,0001. ; that threeor four of the largercourts and the House had determined no were to dispose of the interests of longer to take this sum from the the smaller ones, and that in these pockets of individual merchants, latter it was searcely worth while trading to ports where British conto maintain those representatives suls were stationed, but to throw of the British Crown, whose pre- the charge upon the public genesence, however, was really of so rally. On the old system, 61,0001. much moment to their welfare. were annually paid by government, It never could be the policy of and the various companies ; wherethis country, at any period, so to as, under the new arrangement, discountenance those minor states, the yearly charges for these conas to aid in preventing them from suls were not more than 50,0001., raising their heads, on oceasion, and 11,000l. to the Levant consuls. among the other European go- He looked upon the total allowvernments. He by no means pre ance for such services, however, as tended to say that he was in a being 79,000l. ; from which decondition to predict the time or ducting 30,000l. voted in the civil the states which would one day list, there remained only 49,0001., exemplify the better policy of our to be voted as consuls' salaries. not neglecting them: but the This was the amount called for ; House must feel convinced, that but the relief given by it to the the period might very possibly merchants was 61,0001. In rearrive, some day or other, when gard to the consulates in the new these now minor states might rise states of South America, it was into and manifest themselves as impossible already to lay down a states of much greater power and fixed scale, or adopt a precise estiimportance.

mate. This year there had been The objections to the consular a saving to a considerable extent ; estimates appeared to him equally but it was impossible to say what extraordinary; as the plan, which the expenses for the year might be, gave occasion to them, instead of for no European mission furnished being a measure of the govern- any standard by which to compare ment, was a child begotten by Mr. them. It was most difficult to Hume himself. It had been de- form any trust-worthy scale of the termined by parliament to do away cost of such establishments in states with the whole consular system, where the prices of particular comand place it on a new footing; to modities were very unequal, and abolish all fees, and substitute fixed most of them in nearly an inverse salaries in their place. This was ratio from those of Europe-where the plan adopted, to which he had a man, for instance, might buy a been no party; and it was rather horse for a dollar, but would be hard in Mr. Hume now to turn obliged to pay about two guineas round upon him for endeavouring for shoeing him. In the expenses, to give effect to a system, in the again, of the old diplomatic estabintroduction of which he himself lishments, the scale wat had been so potent an instrument. liament in 1971

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