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" Let him that is a true-born gentleman And stands upon the honour of his birth, If he suppose that I have pleaded truth. From off this brier pluck a white rose with me. 30 Som. Let him that is no coward nor no flatterer, But dare maintain the party of... "
The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of the ... - Sivu 38
tekijä(t) William Shakespeare - 1803
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the Poet, and ...

William Shakespeare - 1851
...glimmer through a blind man's eye. Let him, that is a true-born gentleman, And stands upon the honor of his birth, If he suppose that I have pleaded truth, From off this brier pluck a white rose with me. Son/. Let him that is no coward, nor no flatterer, But dare maintain the party of the truth, Pluck...

THE LIVES OF THE LORD CHANCELLORS AND KEEPERS OF THE GREAT SEALOF ENGLAND,

JOHN LORD CAMPBELL - 1851
...II. Hen. VI. act. iv. sc 1, f Shaks. Part. II. Hen. VI. J " Plantagenet. Let him that is a true born gentleman And stands upon the honour of his birth, If he suppose that I have pleaded truth, Prom off this brier pluck a white rose with me. " Somerset. Let nim that is no coward nor no flatterer,...

The naturalist's poetical companion, with notes, selected by E. Wilson

Naturalist pseud, Edward WILSON (M.A., F.L.S.) - 1852
...The garden here is more convenient. Plantagenet. Since you are tongue-tied, and so loath to speak, In dumb significants proclaim your thoughts : Let...truth, From off this brier pluck a white rose with me. Somerset. Let him that is no coward, and no flatterer, But dare maintain the party of the truth, Pluck...

William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Nide 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...it will glimmer through a blind man's eye. Plan. Since you are tongue-ty'd, and so loath ti speak, g p on this brier plucfc a white rose with me. Som. Let him that is no coward, nor no flatterer But dare...

The Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Dramatic and ..., Nide 2

William Shakespeare - 1853
...through a blind man's eye. Plan. Since you are tongue-ty'd, and so loath to »peakt In dumb signilicants — Come, Romeo ! — come, thou day in night ! For thou wilt lie upon on this brier pluck a white rose with me. So/n. Let him th-it is no coward, nor no flatterer, But dare...

London in 1853. [By Peter Cunningham.]

John Murray (Firm), Peter Cunningham - 1853 - 316 sivua
...the Temple Hal) we were too loud; The garden here is more convenient. ••••t• " Plantagenet. Let him that is a true-born gentleman, And stands upon the honour of his birth, If he suppose that 1 have pleaded truth, From off this brier pluck a white rose with me. " Somerset. Let him that is no...

Chambers's Journal of Popular Literature, Science and Arts, Nide 63

1886
...garden, Plantagenet says : ' Since you are tongue-tied, and so loath to speak, In dumb significance proclaim your thoughts : Let him that is a true-born...truth, From off this brier pluck a white rose with me.' To which Somerset replies : ' Let him that is no coward, nor no flatterer, But dare maintain the party...

Wanderings and Excursions in South Wales: With the Scenery of the River Wye ...

Thomas Roscoe - 1854 - 336 sivua
...Grove. CHAPTER XIV. Sir £hgs ap Cljomas. Plantag. — Since you are tongue-tied, and SO loth to speak, In dumb significants proclaim your thoughts ; Let...he suppose that I have pleaded truth, From off this briar pluck a white rose with me. Som. — Let him that is no coward, nor no flatterer, But dare maintain...

A Guide to the Inns of Court and Chancery: With Notices of Their ..., Sivu 359

Robert Richard Pearce - 1855 - 440 sivua
...Spenser. quarrel of the factions of the red and white roses in the Temple Gardens: — " Plantagenet. Let him that is a true-born gentleman, And stands...he suppose that I have pleaded truth, From off this briar pluck a white rose with me. " Somerset. Let him that is no coward, nor no flatterer, But dare...

The history of woman

Stephen Watson Fullom - 1855
...first civil war the poetic designation of " the Roses." There it was that Plantagenet exclaimed — " Let him that is a true-born gentleman, And stands...he suppose that I have pleaded truth, From off this briar pluck a white rose with me." To which Somerset replies — " Let him that is no coward nor no...




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