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" This power which the mind has thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa, in any particular instance; is that which we call the will. The actual... "
An Abridgment of Mr. Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding - Sivu 57
1752 - 270 sivua
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Eighteenth-Century Philosophy

Lewis White Beck - 1966 - 321 sivua
...power which the mind has thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa, in any particular instance, is that which we call the Will. The actual exercise...
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Anti-Scepticism: Or, Notes Upon Each Chapter of Mr. Lock' Essay Concerning ...

Henry Lee
...prefer ) the confideration of any Idea ( or Object ) or the forbearance of wh"' fuch confideration, or to prefer the Motion of any part of the Body to its R:ft, and vice ver{a in feveral ii'.ftances. To which I add, for the Explication of that Definition,...
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Thomas Reid on Freedom and Morality

William L. Rowe, Anniversary Professor of Poetics at Birkbeck College William Rowe - 1991 - 189 sivua
...end several actions of our minds, and motions of our bodies. . . . This power which the mind has ... to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa, in any particular instance, is that which we call will."9 What is remarkable...
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British Moralists, 1650-1800: Hobbes

David Daiches Raphael - 1991 - 431 sivua
...power which the mind has, thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa in any particular instance is that which we call the will. The actual exercise...
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An Approach to Political Philosophy: Locke in Contexts

James Tully - 1993 - 333 sivua
...will as a power or ability 'to order the consideration of any idea, or the forebearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa in any particular instance' (2.21.15). The exercise of this ability or power in...
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The British Moralists and the Internal 'Ought': 1640-1740

Stephen Darwall - 1995 - 352 sivua
...preference: "This Power the Mind has to prefer the consideration of any Idea, to the not considering it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, is that, I think, we call the W///; and the actual preferring one to another, is that we call...
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The History of Mental Symptoms: Descriptive Psychopathology Since the ...

G. E. Berrios - 1996 - 565 sivua
...power that the mind has thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it: or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa, in any particular instance, is that which we call will. The actual exercise of...
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Gassendi's Ethics: Freedom in a Mechanistic Universe

Lisa T. Sarasohn, Pierre Gassendi - 1996 - 236 sivua
...Power which the mind has, thus to order the consideration of any Idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest . . . , is that which we call the Will. . . . The power of Perception is that which we call 62...
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Philosophical Essays

Antony Flew - 1998 - 213 sivua
...Bodies .... This Power . . . thus to order the consideration of any idea, or the forbearing to consider it; or to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa in any particular instance, is that which we call the Will. (Locke, 236) The second...
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Jefferson's Declaration of Independence: Origins, Philosophy, and Theology

Allen Jayne
...pursuit, however, deriving from his concept of will. He defined will as the "Power which the mind has ... to prefer the motion of any part of the body to its rest, and vice versa in any particular instance." This preference or will was a motivating force: it...
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